{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 211, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/211", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1928", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1928", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1928", "Disp_Title" : "Boomtown", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Thomas Hart Benton", "Sort_Artist" : "Benton, Thomas Hart", "Disp_Dimen" : "46 1/8 x 54 1/4 in. (117.2 x 137.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "46 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "54 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Egg yolk and oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Egg yolk and oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Early in his career, Thomas Hart Benton was involved in the American abstract movement, Synchromism. In the 1920s, Benton embarked on a style that incorporated Synchromist rhythmic line and expressive color with representational imagery of rural America. With this major shift in style, Benton established the Regionalist movement. Many consider Boomtown to be the artist’s first Regionalist masterpiece. [Gallery label text, 2007] Boomtown is one of the masterpieces of the Gallery's collection because of its impressive and unique depiction of an American landscape. When Thomas Hart Benton sketched this panoramic scene from a second floor window, the smoky fire on the horizon signified progress, not pollution. Borger, Texas was a boomtown that sprang to life in 1926 after a refinery company hit a gusher that produced 5000 gallons of oil a day. Benton is one of the three major American Regionalists (the other two are Grant Wood and John Steuart Curry), so called because most of their subjects were about life in the rural heartland of America. While Benton was not a fan of contemporary modernist painting, and in fact disdained artists who painted in the abstract style, he couldn't help but be influenced by the curvy and streamlined aesthetic of his times and the way in which artists were reinterpreting three-dimensional space. Consider the way in which the people, buildings and landscape are layered from top to bottom on the canvas, rather than being laid out carefully from front to back in the manner of traditional artistic renderings. 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"Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.1_R5.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.1_R5.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.1_R5.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.1_R5.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "37733", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 296, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/296", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1939-1940", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1939", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1940", "Disp_Title" : "Whitestone Bridge", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Ralston Crawford", "Sort_Artist" : "Crawford, Ralston", "Disp_Dimen" : "40 1/4 x 32 in. (102.2 x 81.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "40 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "32 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Ralston Crawford’s strong linear style and simplified form and palette in Whitestone Bridge are representative of the modern Precisionist style. Precisionist artists celebrated industrialization and technology with a visual language that evoked the purity and perfection of the machine. [Gallery label text, 2007] The Whitestone Bridge, linking The Bronx and Queens, was opened in 1939 just in time for the New York World's Fair. The suspension bridge routed travelers coming to the Fair from Upstate and New England away from the congestion of New York City. At the same time, Crawford was moving away from painting traditional landscapes and searching for a vocabulary that was closer in spirit to the streamlined, industrial aesthetic that he was observing in the world around him. The Whitestone Bridge was an excellent match for his artistic aspirations. The sleek and futuristic lines of the Whitestone Bridge matched the Trylon and Perisphere logo of the World's Fair, which was intended to signify progress and the World of Tomorrow. By 1944, when this painting was acquired by the Encyclopedia Britannica Collection, the sleek and elegant Whitestone Bridge had become an icon of contemporary design. The curator traveled to New York City to determine whether the bridge really looks as though it extends back into space with no land visible on the other side. And, in fact, Crawford's thrilling vantage point can be experienced by taking the bus across the bridge - for a brief instant, the first-time crosser experiences the view that Crawford recorded: a slim line of road, held up by wires, sailing across the water with no end in sight. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Related_Children" : [ { "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3071", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Study for "Whitestone Bridge"" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3583", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Study for "Whitestone Bridge"" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "297", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Study for Fortune Magazine" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "298", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Study for Fortune Magazine" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3367", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Whitestone Bridge" } ], "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.2_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.2_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.2_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.2_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12382", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008. Image is 800ppi but only 2.5 x 3.5". Needs curatorial approval for other uses.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 333, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/333", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.3", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1931-1932", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1931", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1932", "Disp_Title" : "Landscape with Garage Lights", "Alt_Title" : "Garage Lights", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Stuart Davis", "Sort_Artist" : "Davis, Stuart", "Disp_Dimen" : "32 x 41 7/8 in. (81.3 x 106.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "32 in.", "Disp_Width" : "41 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Stuart Davis began as a student of the Urban Realist style, but upon seeing the many European modernist works on display at the New York Armory Show of 1913, the artist found his passion for abstraction. The influence of the broken-up and flattened surfaces of Cubism and the syncopated rhythms of American jazz contributed to Davis’ personal style. [Gallery label text, 2007] Gloucester, one of Massachusetts's oldest seaports, was a summer home for painter Stuart Davis from the time he was a young man of twenty-two. This view of the harbor clearly captivated him by the early 1930s, and preliminary studies of this painting reveal how carefully he considered the scene and translated it into paint, all the while deliberately conveying a sense of simplicity and speed in its execution. After a Parisian stay in the late 1920s, Davis returned to the United States with a new way of seeing things. The goal for him was to paint an expressive, abstracted version of the world around him, rather than a photographic simulacrum. As modernism challenged the nature of reality and how it is perceived, Davis reminds us here that it is possible to see two sides of a building at once, and that often it really looks like only half of a ship is in the water even though our brains convince us that the other half is hidden behind the fish warehouse. Flatness and simplification of forms were characteristics that distinguished work of influential European painters like Picasso and Matisse, whose work Davis would have encountered during his stay in France. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Related_Children" : [ { "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3088", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Study for "Landscape with Garage Lights"" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3089", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "From Sketchbook 3, Drawing for "Landscape with Garage Lights"" } ], "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.3_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.3_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.3_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.3_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12383", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.3_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.3_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.3_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.3_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "53893", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Rescanned transparency at larger size for reproduction. New JPG derived from that larger TIF.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 348, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/348", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.4", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1938", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1938", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1938", "Disp_Title" : "Cars in a Sleet Storm", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Arthur Dove", "Sort_Artist" : "Dove, Arthur", "Disp_Dimen" : "15 x 21 in. (38.1 x 53.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "15 in.", "Disp_Width" : "21 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Painted in Geneva, NY, Cars in a Sleet Storm is representative of Arthur Dove’s personalized abstract vocabulary with which he responded to the world around him. Dove, along with Georgia O’Keeffe and Marsden Hartley, were members of a group of modernist American artists championed by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz in his 291 Gallery in Manhattan. [Gallery label text, 2007] Arthur G. Dove was a native of Geneva, New York, about 46 miles from Rochester. Early on, rural New York State did not satisfy Dove's desire for a more engaged artistic life, and a few years after the turn of the 20th century, he moved to New York City and then to Paris. On his return to the United States in 1910, he began to paint abstract landscapes, and is considered one of America's first abstract painters. Dove's work was actively exhibited by photographer Alfred Stieglitz in his Gallery 291 and Intimate Gallery, major centers of avant-garde art in the United States. Stieglitz also showed the work of Georgia O'Keeffe whom he married in 1924. Cars in a Sleet Storm was painted at the end of Dove's years in Geneva, where he had returned to manage his father's estate. Dove's own words align him with the 20th century movement away from identifiable subject matter:"I would like to make something that is real in itself, that does not remind anyone of any other thing, and that does not have to be explained like the letter A, for instance." He also commented, "… I no longer observed in the old way, and not only began to think subjectively but also to remember certain sensations purely through their form and color, that is, by certain shapes, planes of light, or character lines determined by the meeting of such planes." [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.4_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.4_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.4_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.4_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25276", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Scanned from 1999 James Via transparency", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.4_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.4_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.4_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.4_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41492", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Color-corrected and cropped from M1 file as no print master existed. JPG derived from new print master.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 418, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/418", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.5", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1942", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1942", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1942", "Disp_Title" : "The Opposition", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "William Gropper", "Sort_Artist" : "Gropper, William", "Disp_Dimen" : "28 x 38 in. (71.1 x 96.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "28 in.", "Disp_Width" : "38 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Lawmakers were threatening to cut significant federal funding for the arts when political cartoonist and painter William Gropper satirized the United States Senate in The Opposition. Gropper wrote, “I have portrayed the type of representative that is opposed to progress and culture. The U.S. Senate…[has] such an influence on American life, good and bad, that it has even affected the artist and the cultural development of our country.” [Gallery label text, 2007] William Gropper was best known for his caustic commentary on the American political and social scene. He depicted realistic and identifiable subjects; The Opposition was one of a number of paintings and illustrations that came out of his 1934 assignment for the magazine Vanity Fair, to sketch legislators in action in Washington. Gropper made no bones about his distaste for politics and used his art to further his point of view: "I have portrayed the type of representative that is opposed to progress and culture. The U.S. Senate and the House of Representatives have had such an influence on American life, good and bad, that it has even affected the artist and the cultural development of our country. No matter how far removed from politics artists may be, it seems to strike home. Only recently one blasting speech of a reactionary representative resulted in not only doing away with the Section of Fine Art, but also dismissing the Graphic Division of the OWI [Office of War Information] and nullifying art reportage for the War Department." Gropper's start as a newspaper illustrator informed the creative processes of the rest of his life. His work retained his journalist's interest in issues of the day, giving it a particularly topical essence presented in a dynamic, expressionistic format. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Related_Children" : [ { "Rel_Obj_ID" : "1714", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "The Opposition" } ], "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.5_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.5_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.5_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.5_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12387", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 419, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/419", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.6", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1943", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1943", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1943", "Disp_Title" : "The Wanderer", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "George Grosz", "Sort_Artist" : "Grosz, George", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 x 40 in. (76.2 x 101.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 in.", "Disp_Width" : "40 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Ten years after fleeing Germany during Hitler’s rise to power, George Grosz painted The Wanderer in New York. As World War II raged over the ocean, Grosz created this intensely personal response to his experience as a German soldier in World War I and his 1933 emigration to the United States. [Gallery label text, 2007] Painted in the midst of World War II, The Wanderer is an expression of the artist’s recent life experience. George Grosz was an established painter in Germany who, like many others, spoke out against the totalitarian Nazi regime. For his own safety and that of his family, he relocated to the United States. The Wanderer was one of a group of so-called ‘hell pictures’; in a letter, he wrote: I work a lot…I painted a little picture – The Wanderer – myself of course…The resonance of explosion and destruction often shakes me bodily. The explosion and destruction was a reference to the war-torn European continent that he had left behind, as well as a reference to his own emotional volatility as he tried to adjust, with little success, to his new life in America, suggested in the painting by the seagrasses he knew from Long Island and Cape Cod beaches. The Wanderer was probably one of the newest paintings acquired for the Encyclopedia Britannica Collection, as the collection was formed in 1943, the same year that Grosz painted this work. Stylistically, the painting’s expression of personal and cultural angst – achieved through desolate subject matter, somber palette, and unquiet line – was very much an alternative view to the more upbeat images of wartime artists like Norman Rockwell. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.6_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.6_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.6_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.6_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12388", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 431, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/431", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.7", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1943", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1943", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1943", "Disp_Title" : "Non-Fiction", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Robert Gwathmey", "Sort_Artist" : "Gwathmey, Robert", "Disp_Dimen" : "29 x 24 in. (73.7 x 61 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "29 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In the 1940s, Robert Gwathmey focused his artist’s eye upon the lives of African-American sharecroppers in the South. Non-Fiction shows a common sight on southern farms; older children tended to the young when both parents worked all day in the fields. The barbed wire and minstrel figure symbolize the dual oppressions of segregation and racism. [Gallery label text, 2007]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.7_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.7_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.7_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.7_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12389", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 511, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/511", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.8", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1945", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1945", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1945", "Disp_Title" : "Clown", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Walt Kuhn", "Sort_Artist" : "Kuhn, Walt", "Disp_Dimen" : "20 x 16 1/4 in. (50.8 x 41.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "20 in.", "Disp_Width" : "16 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Walt Kuhn received great acclaim during his lifetime for the bold simplicity and emotional intensity of his paintings of vaudeville and circus performers. Kuhn was also one of the principal organizers of the landmark and pioneering Armory Show of 1913, which introduced the American public to avant-garde European art and helped change the course of painting and sculpture in the United States. ? [Forman Gallery, Summer 2015]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "See Notes & Histories-Copyright Notes", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.8_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.8_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.8_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.8_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "13418", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 537, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/537", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.9", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1889", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1889", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1889", "Disp_Title" : "London Bus Driver", "Alt_Title" : "Cabby or London Cabby", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "George Luks", "Sort_Artist" : "Luks, George", "Disp_Dimen" : "27 x 22 in. (68.6 x 55.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "27 in.", "Disp_Width" : "22 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Luks, like Glackens, was originally from Philadelphia and moved to New York City in 1896. He was one of The Eight who exhibited together at Macbeth Gallery in 1908, and his painting of a boy with dice reflects his interest in depicting aspects of life in the lower classes. Here, a boy who looks to be no more than ten is smoking, more than likely earning his own living as a shoeshine boy, and supplementing his income by gambling. The painting, inscribed To Elizabeth, was given by the artist to his student, Elizabeth Olds, who studied with him at the Art Students League in New York City. Elizabeth Olds was an accomplished printmaker and, like her teacher, believed in the importance of art for all people, not just the upper classes. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "The painting is also known as ''Cabby'' and ''London Cabby''", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.9_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.9_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.9_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.9_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12390", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3717, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3717", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.10", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1931", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1931", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1931", "Disp_Title" : "Marin Island, Small Point, Maine", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Marin", "Sort_Artist" : "Marin, John", "Disp_Dimen" : "17 x 21 3/4 in. (43.2 x 55.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "17 in.", "Disp_Width" : "21 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Watercolor", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor with graphite on paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Like Arthur G. Dove and Georgia O'Keeffe, John Marin aligned himself with the avant-garde circle surrounding Alfred Stieglitz. While Marin's favorite subjects were landscapes and seascapes, particularly Maine marines, he applied to them the modernist sensibilities that he absorbed from European masters like Cézanne, whose first one-man show was at Stieglitz's Gallery 291 in 1911. The island that Marin depicts here is one that he purchased in 1914 immediately after getting married. It is off the coast of Maine, near Portland. The Maine landscape drew Marin back throughout his life. A chief characteristic of twentieth century painting has been the practice of artists to transform subject with emotion, or as Marin's fellow painter Arthur Dove describes it, to pull the subject matter out and leave the sensation. Here, Marin sketches in the bare bones of his island but then folds it in as part of an all-over expression of action and energy, as if to suggest that the land mass is one with the wind and the waves. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.10_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.10_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.10_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.10_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12376", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 617, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/617", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.11a-b", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1931", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1931", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1931", "Disp_Title" : "Jawbone and Fungus (recto); Untitled (Abstraction) (verso)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Georgia O'Keeffe", "Sort_Artist" : "O'Keeffe, Georgia", "Disp_Dimen" : "17 x 20 in. (43.2 x 50.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "17 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "With her unique vision and expression, Georgia O’Keeffe epitomizes the modern American artist. Her simple, pared down shapes and closely cropped still-lifes of bones and flowers turn objects into landscapes of their own. [Gallery label text, 2007] Painting on the verso, an untitled abstraction, dates to ca. 1923", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Related_Sibling" : [ ], "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.11a_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.11a_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.11a_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.11a_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12378", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008. Needs curatorial approval for other uses.", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.11b_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.11b_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.11b_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.11b_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "55251", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 708, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/708", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.12", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1909", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1909", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1909", "Disp_Title" : "Chinese Restaurant", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Sloan", "Sort_Artist" : "Sloan, John", "Disp_Dimen" : "26 x 32 1/4 in. (66 x 81.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "26 in.", "Disp_Width" : "32 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "John Sloan’s interest in the working class was not only aesthetic, it was also political. By 1909, Sloan was an active member of the Socialist party and used his art to shine a light on the equally noble and interesting lives of the lower classes. Marrying style to subject, Sloan’s loose brushwork and dark colors epitomize the Ashcan style. [Gallery label text, 2007] In 1909, many artists and collectors would not have considered a Chinese restaurant to be an appropriate subject for a painting. The artist, John Sloan, was part of a group of artists labeled “Ashcan” painters early in the century, because of their frequent choice of the less genteel aspects of urban life. Now, Sloan’s paintings are recognized as major documents of American life and this painting, like many others on view in this installation, is often loaned to museums in the United States and overseas. Also called “The Eight,” Sloan and his seven colleagues exhibited together in a landmark show at Macbeth Gallery in 1908 in response to the jurying system of the National Academy and its more traditional members that frequently excluded less conventional artists. It’s amusing to consider that in 1943, when the Encyclopedia Britannica collection was being assembled, that a painting created in 1909 would be considered contemporary. However, it may have been included in recognition of the fact that John Sloan painted his contemporary world as he saw it. In fact, in 1943, the freshness of Sloan’s style and the timeless nature of the scene painted thirty-four years previously did not seem out of keeping with many works from the 1940s. And Sloan was still quite an active artist at this point in his life. [Gallery label text, 2006] As recommended by his mentor, painter Robert Henri, John Sloan derived most of his subjects from close observation of his surroundings. Such was the case on the night of February 23, 1909, when he went out to eat at a restaurant on Sixth Avenue, not far from Herald Square. He wrote, “I saw a strikingly gotten up girl with dashing red feathers in her hat playing with the restaurant's fat cat. It would be a good thing to paint. I may make a go at it.” Characteristically, Sloan waited for a bit before undertaking the work, and on March 15 wrote, “I started a memory painting of the Chinese Restaurant girl I saw some four weeks ago." His intermittent working style is revealed by a diary entry on March, 18, in which he described not only working on the painting, but going to the restaurant again to “refresh my memory of the place.” In 1944, the painting joined a corporate collection of outstanding contemporary art formed by the Encyclopedia Britannica. In 1951, the Memorial Art Gallery acquired fourteen paintings from the collection – this painting and work by Thomas Hart Benton, Georgia O'Keeffe, and Stuart Davis, among others. [Gallery label text, 2003]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.12_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.12_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.12_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.12_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "33004", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk in curatorial office", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 762, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/762", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.13", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1940", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1940", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1940", "Disp_Title" : "Discourse", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Max Weber", "Sort_Artist" : "Weber, Max", "Disp_Dimen" : "27 x 22 in. (68.6 x 55.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "27 in.", "Disp_Width" : "22 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "See Notes & Histories-Copyright Notes", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.13_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.13_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.13_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.13_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12381", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 781, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/781", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.14", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1943", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1943", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1943", "Disp_Title" : "Troupers", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Karl Zerbe", "Sort_Artist" : "Zerbe, Karl", "Disp_Dimen" : "31 x 36 in. (78.7 x 91.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "31 in.", "Disp_Width" : "36 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Encaustic", "Support" : "board", "Disp_Medium" : "Encaustic on board", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.14_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.14_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.14_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.14_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "13380", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }