{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 4798, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4798", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.13", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1910-1914", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1910", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1914", "Disp_Title" : "Veranda Post", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Olowe of Ise", "Sort_Artist" : "Ise, Olowe of", "Disp_Dimen" : "56 x 132 x 10 in. (142.2 x 335.3 x 25.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "56 in.", "Disp_Width" : "132 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "maximum", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "A royal wife stands with her hands resting on the heads of her twin daughters who hold their breasts in a Yoruba gesture of greeting, devotion and humility. This post was carved to decorate a courtyard veranda in the palace of the Ogoga of Ikere, one of the kings of Yorubaland. The courtyard served as an official area where the king received important visitors and conducted affairs of state. It was important that he show off his wealth, power and sophistication in this space. This veranda post was carved by one of the most renowned sculptors in Africa, Olowe of Ise. His sculptures were so beautiful that some people believed Olowe harnessed the power of spirits who carved for him. Elaborate hairstyles and scarification patterns (look at the royal wife’s back) demonstrate Olowe’s technical mastery and reflect Yoruba standards of beauty. Traces of layered pigments indicate that these were once brightly painted and regularly refurbished. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Nigerian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "The piece was still in situ until at least 1964 (see photo in situ in 1998 "Olowe of Ise" exhibition brochure in curatorial file).", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.13_A6.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.13_A6.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.13_A6.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.13_A6.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "38870", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Scanned from transparency and background masked out by Andy Olenick.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4906, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4906", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.20", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Fertility Doll (Akuaba)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 x 3 5/8 in. (25.4 x 9.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood and beads", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Fertility is a universal human concern that has long been a central issue in Africa where the infant mortality rate remains high to this day. An akuaba is a fertility talisman meant to aid an Asante woman yearning to become a mother. Akuaba are affectionately bathed, dressed, fed and carried by women as they would a living child. Their slight, flat shape is designed to be carried on a woman’s back in her cloth wrapper. When the woman’s child survives childhood, the akuaba is sometimes placed in a shrine as an offering of thanks to the god responsible. Almost all of these fertility dolls are female as the Asante are a matrilineal society and most women wish for daughters to carry on their family line. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Nathaniel T. Whitcomb", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Note that incoming 6015 lists "Ashanti fertility dolls," plural, coming from Harris Prior for loan and ultimately gift to the permanent collection-- were there others besides this one?", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.20_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.20_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.20_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.20_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25525", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.20_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.20_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.20_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.20_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25526", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4905, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4905", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.19", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Female Figure (Akuaba)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 1/2 x 4 1/4 in. (26.7 x 10.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Asante women often carry dolls called akuaba to encourage fertility and ensure the health and beauty of the child. The figure is placed at an altar or held in the wrappers of a woman's clothing, treated as a real child until pregnancy occurs. If the resulting child dies, the akuaba might be kept as a memorial to the infant. Akuabas are representative of ideal beauty, demonstrating round or oval heads with high foreheads, and long necks with excess fat, indicating a good state of health. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Nathaniel T. Whitcomb", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.19_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.19_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.19_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.19_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25523", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.19_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.19_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.19_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.19_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25524", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4900, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4900", "Disp_Access_No" : "1962.24", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Stool", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 3/4 x 18 x 9 in. (27.3 x 45.7 x 22.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "18 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In many African cultures, objects (such as carved figures and masks) can act as physical surrogates for spirits wishing to communicate and interact with the living. Stools are central objects in Asante spirituality. The Asante believe the stool used in life houses the owner’s soul in death. This is based in the story of The Golden Stool that descended from the heavens to land in (and thereby legitimize) the lap of the first Asante king. The Asante saying goes, “A man with no stool is a man with no dignity.” [Gallery label text, 2009] The treatment of stools as sacred objects is unique to the Asante kingdom - an Akan empire founded by the great leader Osei Tutu in the late seventeenth century. The tradition began with the great Golden Stool which legend relates floated down from the sky and fell in the lap of Osei Tutu. To this day, the Golden Stool stands as a representation of the soul, or spirit (sunsum) of the Asante people. It is not a throne, but rather a powerful, sacred object, that is guarded by each successive king and forbidden to be sat upon or to touch the ground. The most lavish stools are rewarded to important chiefs or members of the royal court, but commoners also maintain more modest stools. The stool is said to absorb some of the sunsum, or spirit, of his owner. Such an intimate link between owner and stool is reflected in the treatment of the stool after the owner's death. A high official's stool is linked to his role in office and when the owner dies, it is said that "a stool has fallen." The stool is then "blackened" and kept on its side in a separate "stool room." The soul of the ancestor is said to be embodied in the blackened stool. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Anonymous gift", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/62.24_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/62.24_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/62.24_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/62.24_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25502", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 851, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/851", "Disp_Access_No" : "1993.14", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Crest Mask: Female Antelope (Chi Wara)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Bamana", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Bamana", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 1/2 x 7 5/8 x 8 in. (77.5 x 19.4 x 20.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, cane, shell, yarn and brass", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In many cultures, gods and spirits take the form of animals. Selected for their physical or behavioral traits, features of different animals are combined to create mythical creatures whose symbolic powers are greater than those of ordinary beasts. This antelope crest mask combines the curved horns of an antelope, the curious snout and scales of a pangolin (a kind of anteater) and the squat body of an aardvark—all animals that dig up the earth. This makes them fitting representations of Chi Wara, the supernatural being the Bamana believe taught humans to farm. The masks were worn in male/female pairs during dance performances in the fields that taught and encouraged good farming. Today, because of conversion to Islam and a variety of social changes due to westernization, the Chi Wara masquerade is now performed for entertainment and cultural pride. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Isabel C. Herdle", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Malian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.14_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.14_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.14_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.14_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28376", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.14_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.14_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.14_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.14_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28377", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.14_A5.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.14_A5.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.14_A5.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.14_A5.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28379", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On the right, with 69.107 on the left. On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4910, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4910", "Disp_Access_No" : "1969.107", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Crest Mask: Male Antelope (Chi Wara)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Bamana", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Bamana", "Disp_Dimen" : "40 9/16 x 2 15/16 x 13 9/16 in. (103 x 7.5 x 34.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "40 9/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 15/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, fiber, and metal", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In many cultures, gods and spirits take the form of animals. Selected for their physical or behavioral traits, features of different animals are combined to create mythical creatures whose symbolic powers are greater than those of ordinary beasts. This antelope crest mask combines the curved horns of an antelope, the curious snout and scales of a pangolin (a kind of anteater) and the squat body of an aardvark—all animals that dig up the earth. This makes the mask a fitting representations of Chi Wara, the supernatural being the Bamana believe taught humans to farm. Chi wara masks were worn in male/female pairs during dance performances in the fields that taught and encouraged good farming. Today, because of conversion to Islam and a variety of social changes due to westernization, the Chi Wara masquerade is now performed for entertainment and cultural pride. The small pieces of red cloth attached to the snout of this male Chi Wara may have originated in the woolen bandages imported by the French during the First World War. In Bamana culture, red is the color of danger and is often restricted to men of certain status. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Malian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.107_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.107_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.107_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.107_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28367", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.107_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.107_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.107_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.107_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28368", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.107_A6.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.107_A6.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.107_A6.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.107_A6.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28370", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "At the left, with 93.14 on the right. On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7422, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7422", "Disp_Access_No" : "1965.9.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Twin Figure (Ere Ibeji)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Yoruba", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Yoruba", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 3/8 x 2 5/8 x 2 3/4 in. (23.8 x 6.7 x 7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment, beads, cowrie shells, fiber, sacrificial materials", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Yoruba have one of the highest rates of twinning in the world. Twins are endowed with powerful attributes, both auspicious and dangerous. Due to the high mortality rate of twins, when one or both dies, Yoruba mothers procure small wooden statues (ere ibeji) to house the spirits of the deceased. If there is a single ibeji, it is likely that one twin died and one survived. If there are two ibeji figures, then it is likely that both twins died. Wealthy women clothe their ere ibeji in beaded or shelled vests. Surface accumulation and signs of wear are common as ibeji figures are cared for in the same manner as a living child and are handled, clothed, washed, fed and honored with dances and songs. Lyrics from a Yoruba song explain how the care of ere ibeji can control the potentially negative influence of twins’ spirits, “Abuse me and I shall follow you home. Praise me and I shall leave you alone.” Subsequent generations inherit the care of ere ibeji from their ancestors. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Nigerian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.1_A5.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.1_A5.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.1_A5.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.1_A5.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25506", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.1_A6.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.1_A6.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.1_A6.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.1_A6.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25507", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25508", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7424, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7424", "Disp_Access_No" : "1965.9.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Twin Figure (Ere Ibeji)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Yoruba", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Yoruba", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 1/4 x 2 5/8 x 2 5/8 in. (23.5 x 6.7 x 6.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment, beads, cowrie shells, fiber, sacrificial materials", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Yoruba have one of the highest rates of twinning in the world. Twins are endowed with powerful attributes, both auspicious and dangerous. Due to the high mortality rate of twins, when one or both dies, Yoruba mothers procure small wooden statues (ere ibeji) to house the spirits of the deceased. If there is a single ibeji, it is likely that one twin died and one survived. If there are two ibeji figures, then it is likely that both twins died. Wealthy women clothe their ere ibeji in beaded or shelled vests. Surface accumulation and signs of wear are common as ibeji figures are cared for in the same manner as a living child and are handled, clothed, washed, fed and honored with dances and songs. Lyrics from a Yoruba song explain how the care of ere ibeji can control the potentially negative influence of twins’ spirits, “Abuse me and I shall follow you home. Praise me and I shall leave you alone.” Subsequent generations inherit the care of ere ibeji from their ancestors. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Nigerian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.2_A7.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.2_A7.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.2_A7.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.2_A7.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25509", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.2_A8.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.2_A8.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.2_A8.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.2_A8.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25510", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25511", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7407, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7407", "Disp_Access_No" : "1969.72", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Rhythm Pounder (Deble)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Senufo", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Senufo", "Disp_Dimen" : "42 1/2 in. (108 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "42 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In many African societies, life on earth is seen as part of a continuum that permits movement between the spirit and earthly worlds. As ancestors are in a position to assist the living, they must be respected and attended to. The rhythm pounders of the Senufo originally functioned as communication devices in calling the spirits of ancestors to participate in funerals. Held by the upper arms, the rhythm pounder’s thick base is thumped into the earth in rhythm with the sounds of chants, drums and rattles. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.72_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.72_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.72_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.72_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28660", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.72_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.72_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.72_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.72_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28661", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 6676, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/6676", "Disp_Access_No" : "1926.28", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Street Scene, Rabat (Une Rue a Rabat)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Azouaou Mammeri", "Sort_Artist" : "Mammeri, Azouaou", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 x 13 in. (25.4 x 33 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 in.", "Disp_Width" : "13 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Ink", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Ink", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of George Blumenthal for the Committee for the Diffusion of French Art", "Copyright_Type" : "Under copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "French", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Rabat is in Morocco. A "marabout" was a term for a local holy man or ascetic. --KSchauber, Curatorial Research Ass''t, 5/10", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/26.28_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/26.28_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/26.28_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/26.28_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26586", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7401, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7401", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.112", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Double Cup", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Lunda", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Lunda", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 1/2 x 7 x 3 5/8 in. (8.9 x 17.8 x 9.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "R.T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Democratic Republic of the Congo", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.112_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.112_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.112_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.112_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31026", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4899, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4899", "Disp_Access_No" : "1953.76.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Goldweight", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "1 1/4 x 1 3/8 x 5/8 in. (3.2 x 3.5 x 1.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "1 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "1 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Brass", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Brass", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Fueled by rich deposits of gold, the Asante engaged in extensive trade relations with European and African nations. Buyers and vendors used brass weights such as these to counterbalance gold dust on scales. Each Asante family had their own set of brass pieces. Unsurprisingly the vendors’ weights were often too heavy and the buyer’s weights too light. Many goldweights represented local proverbs with social or moral meanings that served as ethical reminders during the sometimes fraught ordeal of gold-weighing. If this weight was associated with a proverb, the cultural association has been lost to us. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R. T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Metalwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.76.2_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.76.2_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.76.2_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.76.2_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "29251", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Temporary image, do not use for web or print", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4891, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4891", "Disp_Access_No" : "1953.76.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Goldweight", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "1 5/8 x 1 1/8 x 1/2 in. (4.1 x 2.9 x 1.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "1 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "1 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Brass", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Brass", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Fueled by rich deposits of gold, the Asante engaged in extensive trade relations with European and African nations. Buyers and vendors used brass weights such as these to counterbalance gold dust on scales. Each Asante family had their own set of brass pieces. Unsurprisingly the vendors’ weights were often too heavy and the buyer’s weights too light. Many goldweights represented local proverbs with social or moral meanings that served as ethical reminders during the sometimes fraught ordeal of gold-weighing. If this weight was associated with a proverb, the cultural association has been lost to us. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R. T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Metalwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.76.1_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.76.1_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.76.1_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.76.1_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "29250", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Temporary image, do not use for web or print", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7387, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7387", "Disp_Access_No" : "1953.75.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Heddle Pulley", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Guro", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Guro", "Disp_Dimen" : "6 1/4 in. (15.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "6 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, horn, twisted cord", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Hand looms are traditionally used by West African men in weaving narrow-strips of cloth. While the heddle pulley is a crucial functional element of the loom, the elaborately carved figure is not. These decorative figures, which fell out of fashion at the end of the last century, were made beautiful simply for the delight and pleasure of the weaver. The human compulsion to beautify functional objects is explained simply by a Guro artist who said, “We cannot live without such beautiful things.” [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R. T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.75.1_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.75.1_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.75.1_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.75.1_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25496", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.75.1_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.75.1_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.75.1_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.75.1_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25495", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.75.1_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.75.1_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.75.1_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.75.1_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25494", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7389, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7389", "Disp_Access_No" : "1953.75.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Heddle Pulley", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Guro", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Guro", "Disp_Dimen" : "8 3/8 in. (21.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "8 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Hand looms are traditionally used by West African men in weaving narrow-strips of cloth. While the heddle pulley is a crucial functional element of the loom, the elaborately carved figure is not. These decorative figures, which fell out of fashion at the end of the last century, were made beautiful simply for the delight and pleasure of the weaver. The human compulsion to beautify functional objects is explained simply by a Guro artist who said, “We cannot live without such beautiful things.” [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R. T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.75.2_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.75.2_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.75.2_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.75.2_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25499", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.75.2_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.75.2_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.75.2_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.75.2_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25498", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.75.2_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.75.2_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.75.2_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.75.2_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25497", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7347, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7347", "Disp_Access_No" : "1968.106", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Necklace", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Teke", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Teke", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 5/16 in. (28.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "11 5/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Brass", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Brass", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Originally worn only by Teke chiefs, these bronze necklaces became a kind of currency that was traded for food, livestock and even wives. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Isabel Herdle in memory of Marjorie Wildenhain", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Jewelry", "Creation_Place2" : "Democratic Republic of the Congo", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/68.106_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/68.106_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/68.106_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/68.106_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26788", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4901, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4901", "Disp_Access_No" : "1967.31", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Fertility Doll (Akuaba)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "12 3/8 x 4 7/8 in. (31.4 x 12.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "12 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Fertility is a universal human concern that has long been a central issue in Africa where the infant mortality rate remains high to this day. An akuaba is a fertility talisman meant to aid an Asante woman yearning to become a mother. The horned hairdo of this akuaba is that of a priestess and indicates the child, if allowed to live, will become a priestess dedicated to a goddess. Normally it is not necessary to dedicate a child; this is more common among older women who had already lost several children. Akuaba are affectionately bathed, dressed, fed and carried by women as they would a living child. Their slight, flat shape is designed to be carried on a woman’s back in her cloth wrapper. When the woman’s child survives childhood, the akuaba is sometimes placed in a shrine as an offering of thanks to the god responsible. Almost all of these fertility dolls are female as the Asante are a matrilineal society and most women wish for daughters to carry on their family line. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "General Acquisitions Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/67.31_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/67.31_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/67.31_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/67.31_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25513", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/67.31_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/67.31_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/67.31_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/67.31_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25514", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4909, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4909", "Disp_Access_No" : "1969.71", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Door Lock", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Bamana", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Bamana", "Disp_Dimen" : "26 x 16 5/8 x 3 1/4 in. (66 x 42.2 x 8.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "26 in.", "Disp_Width" : "16 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood and metal", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This is a door lock of the Bamana people. Inside the lock, metal pins attach the horizontal and vertical elements. A metal key must be inserted into the hole between the creature’s shoulders to release the pins in the lock. But in truth, the functional value of a Bamana door lock is secondary to its spiritual value. An individual determined to break into a house with a sculpted door lock would find it an easy matter. Bamana door locks are primarily meant to protect a home against malevolent spirit forces seeking entry. This lock is in the form of a crocodile or water iguana. In Bamana mythology, these lizards are representatives of Faro, a powerful and beneficent deity who protects against sorcery. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Malian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.71_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.71_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.71_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.71_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26791", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4902, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4902", "Disp_Access_No" : "1970.62", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Female Figure with Child", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 1/4 x 3 3/4 x 3 7/8 in. (28.6 x 9.5 x 9.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, iron, sacrificial materials", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This is likely a representation of the Asante Queen Mother, a female relative of the king who has the authority to nominate his successor. The infant’s dependence on the mother for nourishment and protection symbolizes the kingdom’s dependence upon the Queen Mother for guidance. Associated with earth goddesses, agriculture and fertility, this Queen Mother figure was probably kept as part of a fertility shrine where sacrificial offerings were made (remnants of eggshell still remain on her surface). Scholars are confused by the weapon in the mother’s hand and think perhaps it was added at a later date. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.62_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.62_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.62_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.62_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25515", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.62_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.62_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.62_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.62_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25516", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.62_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.62_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.62_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.62_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25517", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7385, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7385", "Disp_Access_No" : "1970.63", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Granary Door or Shutter", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Dogon", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Dogon", "Disp_Dimen" : "34 1/2 x 24 1/2 x 4 in. (87.6 x 62.2 x 10.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "34 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood and iron", "Info_Page_Comm" : "For hundreds of years the Dogon have lived along a very steep cliff called the Bandiagara Escarpment in buildings made of clay with thatch roofs. Doors like this, still in use by the Dogon, secure access to the variety of food stuffs stored in their granary buildings. The repetitive shapes on this door are stylized representations of male and female ancestors, and the cone-shaped elements on the left refer to fertility and the female breast. This imagery encourages abundance in life and crops and reflects values held by agricultural communities. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Malian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.63_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.63_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.63_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.63_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "26794", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.63_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.63_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.63_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.63_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28373", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7412, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7412", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.64", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Champion-Cultivator Staff", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Senufo", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Senufo", "Disp_Dimen" : "54 in. (137.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "54 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, fiber, cowrie shells, beads, sacrificial materials", "Info_Page_Comm" : "During the annual hoeing contests of the Senufo, the farmer with the most agricultural prowess wins the champion-cultivator staff for one year. The voluptuous and regal figure, the epitome of Senufo beauty, is posted in the ground during competition to watch over and spur on the contestants. These contests are more than simple agricultural competitions; they weave a rich tapestry of art forms—drumming, singing, dancing, and sculpture—to turn back-breaking labor into an inspiring community ritual. The shiny area visible near the figure’s eye is likely residue from the ritual application of oil, a sacrificial offering made to the powers embodied in the staff. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.64_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.64_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.64_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.64_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28655", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.64_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.64_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.64_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.64_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28656", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.64_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.64_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.64_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.64_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28657", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.64_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.64_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.64_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.64_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28658", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7825, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7825", "Disp_Access_No" : "1972.44", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Ladle", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Murik", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Murik", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 1/2 x 5 1/2 x 5 1/2 in. (62.2 x 14 x 14 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, fiber and coconut shell", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John McMaster", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/72.44_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/72.44_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/72.44_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/72.44_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26796", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7375, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7375", "Disp_Access_No" : "1978.42", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Face Mask (Kple Kple)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Baule", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Baule", "Disp_Dimen" : "20 x 9 1/2 x 3 in. (50.8 x 24.1 x 7.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "20 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of a Friend of the Gallery in memory of Hildegarde Lasell Watson", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/78.42_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/78.42_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/78.42_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/78.42_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26806", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7384, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7384", "Disp_Access_No" : "1983.28", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Face Mask (Boo Gle)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Dan", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Dan", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 1/2 x 6 x 4 1/4 in. (29.2 x 15.2 x 10.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "6 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "General Acquisitions Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.28_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.28_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.28_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.28_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26808", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7888, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7888", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.59", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Gourd Pot", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Maasai", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Maasai", "Disp_Dimen" : "13 x 15 in. (33 x 38.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "13 in.", "Disp_Width" : "15 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Gourd", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Gourd", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Lewis Stern", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Decorative Arts", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.59_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.59_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.59_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.59_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "24102", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8133, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8133", "Disp_Access_No" : "1992.80", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1895", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1905", "Disp_Title" : "Shoowa Velvet", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Kuba", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Kuba", "Disp_Dimen" : "22 5/8 x 21 15/16 in. (57.5 x 55.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "22 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "21 15/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Raffia", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Raffia", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund, gift of Molly Stern Estate and Mrs. Harmar Brereton, by exchange", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Textiles", "Creation_Place2" : "Congolese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/92.80_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/92.80_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/92.80_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/92.80_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25004", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Publication quality jpg in the Print Master folder", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14298, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14298", "Disp_Access_No" : "2006.72", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Mask (lipiko) of Makonde Man with Incised Tattoos", "Alt_Title" : "Makonde Helmut Mask", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Mozambican", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Mozambican", "Disp_Dimen" : "", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood and paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Masks like this come from the Makonde culture in Mozambique. Called mapiko (singular lipiko), they are worn by dancers who perform public masquerades in front of large audiences for holidays and important occasions in their villages. The dancers, also called mapiko, wear the masks on the upper half of the head in order to cover the ears, eyes, and nose. They are able to see through the opened mouth. These elaborate performances are part of a living tradition in which the styles of both mask and dance change continually. The abstracted human features of earlier masks emphasize their ritual and sacred nature. In particular, they refer to the importance of ancestral spirits attending and participating in these public masquerades. Over time, sculptors began to decorate the masks with unique facial tattoos that identify the wearer as coming from a specific region or tribe. [Forman Gallery, Summer 2015]", "Dedication" : "Transfer from Education Department", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Mozambican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2006.72_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2006.72_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2006.72_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2006.72_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "24241", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14299, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14299", "Disp_Access_No" : "2006.71", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1950-1960", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1950", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1960", "Disp_Title" : "Mask (lipiko) of Makonde Man with Incised Tattoos", "Alt_Title" : "Makonde Helmut Mask", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Mozambican", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Mozambican", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 3/4 x 7 1/2 x 11 in. (24.8 x 19.1 x 27.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, human hair, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Makonde people are producing more masks and types of masquerades now than ever before. This living, thriving tradition favors innovation, so styles of mask and dance change continually. Masked dancers perform before enthusiastic audiences for holidays or important occasions in the village. This mask, from the 1950s or 60s is in the classic style favored by Makonde people today. The style and design of facial tattoos are unique to the Makonde and would have identified this face as belonging to a specific region or tribe. Most Makonde tattooing ended in the 1960s, so only the older generation wears the distinctive marks today. The specificity of the shaved hairline and the scar on the scalp near the left temple indicate that perhaps this mask was a portrait. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Transfer from Education Department", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Mozambican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2006.71_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2006.71_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2006.71_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2006.71_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "24242", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4914, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4914", "Disp_Access_No" : "1964.102", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Spoon", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Yaoure or Baule", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Yaoure or Baule", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 1/16 x 1 3/4 x 3 3/8 in. (18 x 4.5 x 8.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 1/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "1 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Gertrude H. Moore", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "This was determined to be the same object as that catalogued as 61.16. As the information is filed and the object currently exhibited under the later number, it was decided to make the earlier record inactive and maintain this 64.102 record.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/64.102_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/64.102_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/64.102_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/64.102_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25504", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/64.102_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/64.102_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/64.102_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/64.102_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25505", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7386, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7386", "Disp_Access_No" : "1965.25", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Head Fragment", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Edo (Bini)", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Edo (Bini)", "Disp_Dimen" : "4 1/4 x 3 3/16 x 2 5/16 in. (10.8 x 8.1 x 5.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "4 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 3/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This small head fragment from the Benin culture in Nigeria is the oldest African object in the Memorial Art Gallery’s collection. It was a part of the great royal court art of Benin and likely represents one of the deceased kings (Oba) or attendants. The Benin believed the Oba was both a deity and a human ruler. The Benin kingdom was known for its very fine brass casting and this small clay head may have served as a casting form for a shrine figure. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Nigerian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.25_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.25_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.25_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.25_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25512", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7345, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7345", "Disp_Access_No" : "1967.64", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Bracelet", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Fur", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Fur", "Disp_Dimen" : "1 5/8 x 3 1/4 x 3 1/4 in. (4.1 x 8.3 x 8.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "1 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Ivory", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Ivory", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Frans Wildenhain in memory of Marjorie Wildenhain", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Jewelry", "Creation_Place2" : "Sudanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/67.64_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/67.64_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/67.64_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/67.64_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31038", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7411, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7411", "Disp_Access_No" : "1970.22", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Helmet Mask (Waniougo)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Senufo", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Senufo", "Disp_Dimen" : "14 3/8 x 25 3/4 x 13 in. (36.5 x 65.4 x 33 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "14 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "25 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The sharp edges and angular forms of this double-faced mask (waniougo) result in a fierce and expressive presence. A fearsome appearance is desirable as waniougo’s role is to frighten away evil spirits wishing to harm a Senufo village at times of particular vulnerability, for example at funerals. Their appearance in nighttime masquerades enhances the otherworldly presence of these “firespitter” masks; embers or burning grass are held in front of the mouths through which the wearer blows to creating a dramatic shower of sparks into the night sky. Waniougo combines the features of crocodiles (teeth), hippos (tusks), warthogs (upper tusks) and chameleons (two are visible on the top). In order to empower the mask before the ceremony, the cup held by the chameleons is filled with magical materials and the mask freshly painted with spots. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.22_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.22_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.22_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.22_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "15068", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4915, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4915", "Disp_Access_No" : "1969.33", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Female Figure (Blolo Bla or Asie Usu)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Baule", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Baule", "Disp_Dimen" : "17 1/8 x 3 1/8 x 3 in. (43.5 x 7.9 x 7.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "17 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Baule believe each person has a spirit spouse (husband=blolo bian, wife=blolo bla). The presence of a troublesome, jealous spirit spouse can result in illness or misfortune. A carving can be commissioned to ensure the spirit’s protection and good will. These extremely private sculptures are kept hidden in the owner’s bedroom where they are attended to and anointed with oil. Raised scarification patterns represent Baule standards of beauty and identity, while their contained posture and introspective expression reflect social virtues of tradition and decorum. Bush spirit figures (asye usu) are carved when an uncivilized bush spirit forms an attachment to a human and makes trouble in their life. Asye usu can only be appeased by a sculpted figure kept enshrined and placated with offerings that, over time accumulate in a thick crust. This surface (often cleaned off when the sculpture is sold) is the only way to distinguish between a spirit spouse and a bush spirit, as in all other ways they look the same. For this reason, it is impossible to know if this figure is a spirit spouse or a bush spirit figure. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.33_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.33_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.33_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.33_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31031", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4916, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4916", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.19", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Male Figure (Blolo Bian or Asie Usu)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Baule", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Baule", "Disp_Dimen" : "18 x 4 x 4 1/4 in. (45.7 x 10.2 x 10.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "18 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Baule believe each person has a spirit spouse (husband=blolo bian, wife=blolo bla). The presence of a troublesome, jealous spirit spouse can result in illness or misfortune. A carving can be commissioned to ensure the spirit’s protection and good will. These extremely private sculptures are kept hidden in the owner’s bedroom where they are attended to and anointed with oil. Raised scarification patterns represent Baule standards of beauty and identity, while their contained posture and introspective expression reflect social virtues of tradition and decorum. Bush spirit figures (asye usu) are carved when an uncivilized bush spirit forms an attachment to a human and makes trouble in their life. Asye usu can only be appeased by a sculpted figure kept enshrined and placated with offerings that, over time accumulate in a thick crust. This surface (often cleaned off when the sculpture is sold) is the only way to distinguish between a spirit spouse and a bush spirit, as in all other ways they look the same. For this reason, it is impossible to know if this figure is a spirit spouse or a bush spirit figure. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.19_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.19_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.19_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.19_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25518", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.19_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.19_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.19_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.19_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25519", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.19_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.19_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.19_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.19_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25520", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8131, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8131", "Disp_Access_No" : "1992.79", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1895", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1905", "Disp_Title" : "Shoowa Velvet", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Kuba", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Kuba", "Disp_Dimen" : "20 9/16 x 23 1/4 in. (52.3 x 59 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "20 9/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "23 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Raffia", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Raffia", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Kuba people are renowned for their shoowa velvet, the creation of which is strictly divided along gender lines; men weave the cloth and women do the needlework. This incredibly time-consuming process can take several months to a year to reach completion on one panel. These panels are not made into clothing, but rather treated as currency and valued as treasured personal objects. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund, gift of Molly Stern Estate and Mrs. Harmar Brereton, by exchange", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Textiles", "Creation_Place2" : "Congolese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/92.79_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/92.79_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/92.79_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/92.79_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31229", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Temporary image, not for print or web", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8135, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8135", "Disp_Access_No" : "1992.81", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1895", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1905", "Disp_Title" : "Shoowa Velvet", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Kuba", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Kuba", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 11/16 x 27 3/8 in. (29.7 x 69.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 11/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "27 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Raffia", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Raffia", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund, gift of Molly Stern Estate and Mrs. Harmar Brereton, by exchange", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Textiles", "Creation_Place2" : "Congolese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/92.81_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/92.81_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/92.81_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/92.81_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "31230", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Temporary image, not for print or web", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8137, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8137", "Disp_Access_No" : "1992.82", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1895", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1905", "Disp_Title" : "Shoowa Velvet", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Kuba", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Kuba", "Disp_Dimen" : "16 5/8 x 17 1/2 in. (42.3 x 44.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "16 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "17 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Raffia", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Raffia", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund, gift of Molly Stern Estate and Mrs. Harmar Brereton, by exchange", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Textiles", "Creation_Place2" : "Congolese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/92.82_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/92.82_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/92.82_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/92.82_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "31231", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Temporary image, not for print or web", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }