{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 4900, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4900", "Disp_Access_No" : "1962.24", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Stool", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 3/4 x 18 x 9 in. (27.3 x 45.7 x 22.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "18 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In many African cultures, objects (such as carved figures and masks) can act as physical surrogates for spirits wishing to communicate and interact with the living. Stools are central objects in Asante spirituality. The Asante believe the stool used in life houses the owner’s soul in death. This is based in the story of The Golden Stool that descended from the heavens to land in (and thereby legitimize) the lap of the first Asante king. The Asante saying goes, “A man with no stool is a man with no dignity.” [Gallery label text, 2009] The treatment of stools as sacred objects is unique to the Asante kingdom - an Akan empire founded by the great leader Osei Tutu in the late seventeenth century. The tradition began with the great Golden Stool which legend relates floated down from the sky and fell in the lap of Osei Tutu. To this day, the Golden Stool stands as a representation of the soul, or spirit (sunsum) of the Asante people. It is not a throne, but rather a powerful, sacred object, that is guarded by each successive king and forbidden to be sat upon or to touch the ground. The most lavish stools are rewarded to important chiefs or members of the royal court, but commoners also maintain more modest stools. The stool is said to absorb some of the sunsum, or spirit, of his owner. Such an intimate link between owner and stool is reflected in the treatment of the stool after the owner's death. A high official's stool is linked to his role in office and when the owner dies, it is said that "a stool has fallen." The stool is then "blackened" and kept on its side in a separate "stool room." The soul of the ancestor is said to be embodied in the blackened stool. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Anonymous gift", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/62.24_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/62.24_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/62.24_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/62.24_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25502", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7385, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7385", "Disp_Access_No" : "1970.63", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Granary Door or Shutter", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Dogon", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Dogon", "Disp_Dimen" : "34 1/2 x 24 1/2 x 4 in. (87.6 x 62.2 x 10.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "34 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood and iron", "Info_Page_Comm" : "For hundreds of years the Dogon have lived along a very steep cliff called the Bandiagara Escarpment in buildings made of clay with thatch roofs. Doors like this, still in use by the Dogon, secure access to the variety of food stuffs stored in their granary buildings. The repetitive shapes on this door are stylized representations of male and female ancestors, and the cone-shaped elements on the left refer to fertility and the female breast. This imagery encourages abundance in life and crops and reflects values held by agricultural communities. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Malian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.63_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.63_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.63_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.63_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "26794", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.63_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.63_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.63_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.63_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28373", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11299, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11299", "Disp_Access_No" : "1977.203", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Snow Beater", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Eskimo or Inuit", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Eskimo or Inuit", "Disp_Dimen" : "19 3/4 x 4 1/8 x 1/16 in. (50.2 x 10.5 x 0.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "19 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "maximum", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Snow beaters were used to remove snow from clothing before going indoors. An important accessory in the Arctic, they helped to keep clothing from deteriorating in the humid atmosphere inside. Due to the limited availability of wood in the region, most snow beaters were carved out of ivory and are much narrower than the wooden one on display here. However, groups that lived near the mouths of rivers in the arctic (primarily Alaska) would have access to driftwood, as would Yupik Eskimos living along the lower reaches of the Yukon and Kuskokwim Rivers where there were stands of trees. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Anonymous gift", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American or First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/77.203_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/77.203_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/77.203_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/77.203_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26579", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7389, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7389", "Disp_Access_No" : "1953.75.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Heddle Pulley", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Guro", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Guro", "Disp_Dimen" : "8 3/8 in. (21.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "8 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Hand looms are traditionally used by West African men in weaving narrow-strips of cloth. While the heddle pulley is a crucial functional element of the loom, the elaborately carved figure is not. These decorative figures, which fell out of fashion at the end of the last century, were made beautiful simply for the delight and pleasure of the weaver. The human compulsion to beautify functional objects is explained simply by a Guro artist who said, “We cannot live without such beautiful things.” [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R. T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.75.2_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.75.2_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.75.2_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.75.2_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25499", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.75.2_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.75.2_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.75.2_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.75.2_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25498", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.75.2_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.75.2_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.75.2_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.75.2_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25497", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7387, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7387", "Disp_Access_No" : "1953.75.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Heddle Pulley", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Guro", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Guro", "Disp_Dimen" : "6 1/4 in. (15.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "6 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, horn, twisted cord", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Hand looms are traditionally used by West African men in weaving narrow-strips of cloth. While the heddle pulley is a crucial functional element of the loom, the elaborately carved figure is not. These decorative figures, which fell out of fashion at the end of the last century, were made beautiful simply for the delight and pleasure of the weaver. The human compulsion to beautify functional objects is explained simply by a Guro artist who said, “We cannot live without such beautiful things.” [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R. T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.75.1_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.75.1_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.75.1_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.75.1_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25496", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.75.1_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.75.1_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.75.1_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.75.1_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25495", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.75.1_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.75.1_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.75.1_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.75.1_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25494", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7401, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7401", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.112", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Double Cup", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Lunda", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Lunda", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 1/2 x 7 x 3 5/8 in. (8.9 x 17.8 x 9.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "R.T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Democratic Republic of the Congo", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.112_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.112_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.112_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.112_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31026", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14299, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14299", "Disp_Access_No" : "2006.71", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1950-1960", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1950", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1960", "Disp_Title" : "Mask (lipiko) of Makonde Man with Incised Tattoos", "Alt_Title" : "Makonde Helmut Mask", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Mozambican", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Mozambican", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 3/4 x 7 1/2 x 11 in. (24.8 x 19.1 x 27.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, human hair, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Makonde people are producing more masks and types of masquerades now than ever before. This living, thriving tradition favors innovation, so styles of mask and dance change continually. Masked dancers perform before enthusiastic audiences for holidays or important occasions in the village. This mask, from the 1950s or 60s is in the classic style favored by Makonde people today. The style and design of facial tattoos are unique to the Makonde and would have identified this face as belonging to a specific region or tribe. Most Makonde tattooing ended in the 1960s, so only the older generation wears the distinctive marks today. The specificity of the shaved hairline and the scar on the scalp near the left temple indicate that perhaps this mask was a portrait. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Transfer from Education Department", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Mozambican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2006.71_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2006.71_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2006.71_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2006.71_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "24242", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7412, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7412", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.64", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Champion-Cultivator Staff", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Senufo", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Senufo", "Disp_Dimen" : "54 in. (137.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "54 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, fiber, cowrie shells, beads, sacrificial materials", "Info_Page_Comm" : "During the annual hoeing contests of the Senufo, the farmer with the most agricultural prowess wins the champion-cultivator staff for one year. The voluptuous and regal figure, the epitome of Senufo beauty, is posted in the ground during competition to watch over and spur on the contestants. These contests are more than simple agricultural competitions; they weave a rich tapestry of art forms—drumming, singing, dancing, and sculpture—to turn back-breaking labor into an inspiring community ritual. The shiny area visible near the figure’s eye is likely residue from the ritual application of oil, a sacrificial offering made to the powers embodied in the staff. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.64_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.64_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.64_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.64_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28655", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.64_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.64_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.64_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.64_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28656", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.64_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.64_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.64_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.64_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28657", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.64_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.64_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.64_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.64_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28658", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }