{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 22248, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/22248", "Disp_Access_No" : "23.2009L", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Charm", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Disp_Dimen" : "4 5/16 x 6 5/16 x 11/16 in. (11 x 16.1 x 1.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "4 5/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "6 5/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Boar tusk, plant fiber", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The human impulse to embellish and beautify one’s body found expression in many ways in Oceania. Body paint, tattooing, jewelry and masking are all ways in which Oceanic people have adorned themselves. This charm, suspended from the neck as a breast ornament, was a sign of rank and prestige. In order to create such an ornament, a boar was captured alive and two teeth were removed from its upper jaw. The animal was kept in captivity until the tusks of the lower jaw curved upwards, creating a complete circle. This symbol of status showed the wearer had the wealth to feed, house and care for a boar. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "From the collection of the Buffalo Museum of Science, C11130", "Copyright_Type" : "Unknown Artist", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Jewelry", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/23.2009L_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/23.2009L_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/23.2009L_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/23.2009L_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "30796", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 22249, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/22249", "Disp_Access_No" : "24.2009a-bL", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Earrings", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Disp_Dimen" : "9/16 x 3 1/4 in. (1.4 x 8.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Rat tail, plant fiber", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "C11201, C11203. P. G. T. Black Collection; From the collection of the Buffalo Museum of Science", "Copyright_Type" : "Unknown Artist", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Jewelry", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/24.2009La-b_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/24.2009La-b_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/24.2009La-b_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/24.2009La-b_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "30797", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7857, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7857", "Disp_Access_No" : "1987.84", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Spirit Board (Gope)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Disp_Dimen" : "54 x 12 3/4 in. (137.2 x 32.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "54 in.", "Disp_Width" : "12 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Traditionally, spirit or gope boards were considered dwelling places for individual spirits. Each spirit was linked to specific parts of the land, river or sea associated with the clan. They were kept in each clan’s cubicle within the larger Men’s House along with other items such as human and animal skulls meant to honor various spirits within their clan. The boards' highly stylized imagery is believed to represent the way the spirit looks. While the imagery reflects certain consistencies within clans, their varied style and appearance reflects individual artists’ representations of individual spirits. Despite differences, every board has a face and a navel. The navel was particularly important because it served as the access point through which the spirit entered the board. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of James and Denise Wasserstrom", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/87.84_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/87.84_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/87.84_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/87.84_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29879", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "These images are smaller than the usual in-house registration photographs because they were taken with Jessica Marten''s personal Canon camera which does not have a raw file format. But because they were taken with accession numbers and color bars, it was determined it was best to create master, print, access files, rather than just access files. These are not appropriate for publication, but are perfectly good for web display.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7854, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7854", "Disp_Access_No" : "1987.82", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Spirit Board (Gope)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Disp_Dimen" : "47 1/2 x 7 5/8 in. (120.7 x 19.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "47 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Traditionally, spirit or gope boards were considered dwelling places for individual spirits. Each spirit was linked to specific parts of the land, river or sea associated with the clan. They were kept in each clan’s cubicle within the larger Men’s House along with other items such as human and animal skulls meant to honor various spirits within their clan. The boards' highly stylized imagery is believed to represent the way the spirit looks. While the imagery reflects certain consistencies within clans, their varied style and appearance reflects individual artists’ representations of individual spirits. Despite differences, every board has a face and a navel. The navel was particularly important because it served as the access point through which the spirit entered the board. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of James and Denise Wasserstrom", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/87.82_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/87.82_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/87.82_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/87.82_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29877", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "These images are smaller than the usual in-house registration photographs because they were taken with Jessica Marten''s personal Canon camera which does not have a raw file format. But because they were taken with accession numbers and color bars, it was determined it was best to create master, print, access files, rather than just access files. These are not appropriate for publication, but are perfectly good for web display.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7849, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7849", "Disp_Access_No" : "1987.79", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Spirit Board (Gope)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Disp_Dimen" : "44 3/8 x 9 1/2 in. (112.7 x 24.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "44 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Traditionally, spirit or gope boards were considered dwelling places for individual spirits. Each spirit was linked to specific parts of the land, river or sea associated with the clan. They were kept in each clan’s cubicle within the larger Men’s House along with other items such as human and animal skulls meant to honor various spirits within their clan. The boards' highly stylized imagery is believed to represent the way the spirit looks. While the imagery reflects certain consistencies within clans, their varied style and appearance reflects individual artists’ representations of individual spirits. Despite differences, every board has a face and a navel. The navel was particularly important because it served as the access point through which the spirit entered the board. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of James and Denise Wasserstrom", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/87.79_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/87.79_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/87.79_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/87.79_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29863", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "These images are smaller than the usual in-house registration photographs because they were taken with Jessica Marten''s personal Canon camera which does not have a raw file format. But because they were taken with accession numbers and color bars, it was determined it was best to create master, print, access files, rather than just access files. These are not appropriate for publication, but are perfectly good for web display.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 22245, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/22245", "Disp_Access_No" : "20.2009L", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Zoomorphic Drum", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Disp_Dimen" : "36 13/16 x 8 11/16 x 12 1/8 in. (93.5 x 22 x 30.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "36 13/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "8 11/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "with mount", "Medium" : "", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, shells, feathers, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This drum is on loan from one of the most significant collections of pre-contact Oceanic art in the nation held at the Buffalo Museum of Science. This local treasure is due largely to the skillful collecting of Chauncey J. Hamlin, prior president of the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences, and his 1938 acquisition of the P. G. T. Black collection. Black was one of the earliest westerners to visit Oceania. As an agent for a company that supplied mission stations, he collected art as he traveled throughout the area between 1886 and1914. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "From the collection of the Buffalo Museum of Science, C8032", "Copyright_Type" : "Unknown Artist", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Musical Instrument", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/20.2009L_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/20.2009L_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/20.2009L_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/20.2009L_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "43987", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }