{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 938, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/938", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.40", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1895", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1905", "Disp_Title" : "Merry-Go-Round Goat", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Charles Looff", "Sort_Artist" : "Looff, Charles", "Disp_Dimen" : "72 1/4 in. (183.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "72 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood and paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In the second half of the nineteenth century, with the rising popularity of resort communities on streetcar routes, carvers began to specialize in carousel and merry-go-round figures to populate the musical rides. Unfortunately, we don’t know the original location of MAG’s Goat. Based on the style of the carving of the saddle and bridle, it is likely that it was made by Charles Looff, whose company manufactured the first carousel at Coney Island. [Gallery label text, 2002]", "Dedication" : "General Acquisitions Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Recreational Artifact", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.40_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.40_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.40_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.40_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12448", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1111, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1111", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.41", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Hobby Horse", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, American", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, American", "Disp_Dimen" : "27 in. (68.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "27 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood and paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Children around the world have played with toy horses for centuries. Egyptian children in the fifth century, Viking children in the eleventh century, and American children today enjoy riding toy horses and pulling them along on wheels. This horse, with its horsehair tail, glass eyes, and leather seat, originally might have been created to move on a wheeled platform. [Gallery label text, 2002]", "Dedication" : "General Acquisitions Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Recreational Artifact", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.41_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.41_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.41_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.41_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "13876", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2828, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2828", "Disp_Access_No" : "1960.27", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Needlecase with Needle", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Eskimo or Inuit", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Eskimo or Inuit", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 1/4 in. (26 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Bone", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Bone, leather", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Traditional Inuit clothing was carefully made and very well-fitted; its meticulous construction served as protection against the harsh elements and could make the difference between life and death. As a result, sewing materials were both necessary and precious. Needles of polar bear bone were often kept in needle cases made from carved bone or ivory; needles can be threaded through the skin pull for safe keeping. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Edward K. Brown", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Recreational Artifact", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American or First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/60.27_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/60.27_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/60.27_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/60.27_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26578", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 6047, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/6047", "Disp_Access_No" : "1990.13", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "4th Century BCE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "400 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "301 BCE", "Disp_Title" : "Baby Rattle", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Greek", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Greek", "Disp_Dimen" : "1 9/16 x 4 7/16 x 2 1/4 in. (4 x 11.2 x 5.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "1 9/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 7/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Terracotta", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Terracotta, polychrome", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. John W. Morse", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Recreational Artifact", "Creation_Place2" : "Greek", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/90.13_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/90.13_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/90.13_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/90.13_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25287", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7628, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7628", "Disp_Access_No" : "1928.99", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "4th Century BCE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "400 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "301 BCE", "Disp_Title" : "Jointed Doll Holding a Tambourine", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Greek", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Greek", "Disp_Dimen" : "4 1/2 x 2 5/8 x 1 11/16 in. (11.4 x 6.6 x 4.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "4 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Terracotta", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Terracotta, traces of polychromy", "Info_Page_Comm" : "On the night before a Greek girl married, she dedicated her childhood toys and dolls to a goddess, usually Artemis, the chaste goddess of the moon and the hunt. Jointed dolls were common and were made of materials such as wood, terracotta, bone, ivory, marble and alabaster. Their bodies were covered with white or flesh-colored slip (liquid clay) and the hair was painted red or yellow. [Gallery label text, 2004]", "Dedication" : "The C. Herbert Ocumpaugh Collection", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Recreational Artifact", "Creation_Place2" : "Greek", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Per registrar''s ledger: from Athens", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/28.99_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/28.99_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/28.99_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/28.99_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25134", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8117, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8117", "Disp_Access_No" : "1937.16", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Shadow Puppet [Wayang Kulit] of Puntadéwa", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Wayang Kulit", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Javanese", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Javanese", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 in. (61 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Leather", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Carved and colored buffalo hide with carved horn handles", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The shadow puppets of Indonesia, called wayang kulit (literally, “shadow-made-by-leather”), are flat, elaborately painted, and intricately carved leather puppets that in performances cast dramatic shadows on a screen. These shadow puppet plays, which are always accompanied by a gamelan, a traditional Indonesian orchestra, are among the oldest and greatest storytelling traditions in the world. There are over 200 plays in the wayang kulit theater repertoire; many are drawn from the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India, the Ramayana and the Mahabharta. This puppet represents the young Puntadéwa, a key protagonist of the Mahabharta, which has as one of its basic teachings the triumph of virtue over evil. Puntadéwa was the eldest son of the “good” Pandhawa family, which struggled to regain its kingdom from their evil Kurawa cousins. After years of exile and war, Puntadéwa became the king known as Yudhistira; he was revered for his wisdom and piety. Many of the visual elements of this puppet are traditional to the character of Puntadéwa. His bowed head indicates kingship and modesty. The elaborate bustle on his loin cloth, intricately painted with imitation embroidery, is also a princely motif. --Gallery label text, spring 2011", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Forman", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Recreational Artifact", "Creation_Place2" : "Javanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/37.16_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/37.16_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/37.16_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/37.16_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41287", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }