{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 5296, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5296", "Disp_Access_No" : "1944.64", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1200-1500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1200", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1500", "Disp_Title" : "Figure of Quetzalcoatl", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Aztec", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Aztec", "Disp_Dimen" : "26 in. (66 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "26 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Volcanic stone", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Volcanic stone", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Aztec deity sculptures exist in the thousands, despite a campaign of destruction by the conquering Spanish who believed they were heathen idols. This sculpture represents the Aztec creator god, Quetzalcoatl. His name combines the words for “precious green feather” (quetzalli) and “serpent” (coatl), thus combining the two religious/cosmological realms, the sky realm and earth. Representations of their gods were made recognizable to the Aztec people by their individual attributes. Here Quetzalcoatl wears his characteristic curved shell ear ornaments and conical headpiece. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "R.T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Stonework", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/44.64_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/44.64_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/44.64_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/44.64_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29771", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/44.64_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/44.64_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/44.64_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/44.64_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "29772", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5414, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5414", "Disp_Access_No" : "1977.101", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1060-1340", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1060", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1340", "Disp_Title" : "Human Figure Vessel", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Casas Grandes", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Casas Grandes", "Disp_Dimen" : "6 1/2 x 5 1/2 x 5 3/4 in. (16.5 x 14 x 14.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "6 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay, pigments", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This vessel likely held water, porridge or an alcoholic beverage. Casas Grandes was a trade emporium in the northernmost part of Mexico, where its sharing of influences with Southwest Native Americans is visible in the ceramics traditions of both cultures. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Ruby Miller Memorial Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/77.101_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/77.101_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/77.101_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/77.101_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "30518", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5452, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5452", "Disp_Access_No" : "1982.50", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "300 BC - 200 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "300 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "200", "Disp_Title" : "Mother and Child Figures", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Chupícuaro", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Chupícuaro", "Disp_Dimen" : "12 x 5 1/2 x 5 in. (30.5 x 14 x 12.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "12 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay, pigments", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This mother and child may symbolize continuity and legitimacy of the family line. Women were identified with and valued for their role as progenitor; hence this figure’s suitability for reproduction is emphasized in a generous belly and bulbous hips. Reinforcing powerful associations between women, fertility, food and the earth, Chupicuaro burials contained many ceramic food vessels and female figures. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "General Acquisitions Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/82.50_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/82.50_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/82.50_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/82.50_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "30520", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5293, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5293", "Disp_Access_No" : "1942.24", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 200 BCE – 500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "200 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "500", "Disp_Title" : "Horned Hunchback Figure Vessel", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Colima", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Colima", "Disp_Dimen" : "12 7/8 x 9 in. (32.7 x 22.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "12 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Many ceramic hunchback figures with single horns strapped to their heads have been found in the tombs of the Colima culture. The frequency with which hunchbacks and dwarfs appear in the art of the Ancient Americas may indicate their significant status as shamans or spiritual advisors. The horns strapped to the Colima figures are thought to represent powerful caps characteristically worn by shamans across many cultures. Shamanism is a religious system in which the shaman is a spiritual mediator between the physical and spiritual worlds. A shaman figure buried in a tomb may have served to guide the deceased’s transition from the living to the realm of the dead. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "By exchange from Stendahl Galleries", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/42.24_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/42.24_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/42.24_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/42.24_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29767", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/42.24_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/42.24_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/42.24_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/42.24_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "29768", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/42.24_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/42.24_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/42.24_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/42.24_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "29769", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5360, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5360", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.59", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 200 BCE - 500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "200 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "500", "Disp_Title" : "Hunchback Dwarf Figure Vessel", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Colima", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Colima", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 13/16 x 6 7/8 x 5 15/16 in. (25 x 17.4 x 15.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 13/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "6 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Some figural art created by Ancient American cultures may not depict actual humans, but may use the human form as a symbol. The lives of the people of ancient Mesoamerica depended upon their ability to grow and produce food. The cultivation of maize (corn) was central to their world view. The human figure could capture aspects of a belief system that intertwined the cycles of life with the cycles of agriculture. For example, a hunchback (“fatback”) might symbolize abundance, and a dwarf might represent the stunted ears of corn a typical maize plant produces with the healthy ear. Mother and child figures might symbolize lineage or the way corn starts as a kernel, grows into a stalk of corn, and is harvested for consumption. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.59_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.59_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.59_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.59_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "15785", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.59_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.59_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.59_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.59_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20171", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.59_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.59_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.59_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.59_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20172", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5290, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5290", "Disp_Access_No" : "1942.14", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 200 BCE - 500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "200 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "500", "Disp_Title" : "Seated Dog Vessel", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Colima", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Colima", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 3/4 x 4 3/4 in. (27.3 x 12.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The rounded, hollow Colima vessels were made with reddish clay. The black spattering was not intentional, it is the result of the oxidation of the chemical element, manganese, present in the clay. This occurred when the manganese was leached out, over time, by contact with water in the tombs. The vessels’ smooth, lustrous surfaces were attained through burnishing – a process of rubbing the surface with a smooth rock to make it shiny. In addition to ceramics, valuable goods obtained through trade, such as shell, green stone and obsidian were buried in the shaft-and-chamber tombs of the Colima people. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R.T. Miller, Jr. Fund #2", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/42.14_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/42.14_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/42.14_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/42.14_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20151", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5310, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5310", "Disp_Access_No" : "1954.40.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "200 BCE - 500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "200 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "500", "Disp_Title" : "Seated Female Figure", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Colima", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Colima", "Disp_Dimen" : "6 5/8 x 4 3/4 x 3 1/2 in. (16.8 x 12.1 x 8.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "6 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The ancient people of West Mexico focused upon the powerful bonds of familial relationships in their ceramics. Treating death not as an end of existence, but as a next stage in a larger journey, these transitional objects were made in the physical world for travel with the dead to the Underworld. Perhaps such figural ceramic groups were made to accompany the deceased into the afterlife as an extension of earthly comforts. Another, more symbolic and less personal approach interprets the ceramic groups as embodiments of agriculture, abundance or lineage. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R.T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/54.40.1_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/54.40.1_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/54.40.1_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/54.40.1_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20156", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/54.40.1-.2_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/54.40.1-.2_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/54.40.1-.2_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/54.40.1-.2_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20157", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5432, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5432", "Disp_Access_No" : "1978.138", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "200 BCE - 500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "200 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "500", "Disp_Title" : "Standing Dog Vessel", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Colima", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Colima", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 1/2 x 5 x 12 1/2 in. (19.1 x 12.7 x 31.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In nearly every world culture, dogs were the first domesticated animals. A large proportion of Colima tombs had actual dogs or dog-shaped vessels interred with the deceased. The frequently plump bodies of the dog vessels and their ubiquity in Colima tombs support different theories. Some scholars believe they represent a hairless breed of dog that was fattened and eaten at feasts. Others think the primary role of the dog was as spiritual guide to the Underworld. Those well-treated in life (and thus well-fed) would act as a guide for the owner’s safe passage to the Underworld in death. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Canon and Mrs. Nathaniel T. Whitcomb", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/78.138_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/78.138_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/78.138_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/78.138_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "27874", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11188, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11188", "Disp_Access_No" : "1954.40.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "200 BCE - 500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "200 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "500", "Disp_Title" : "Standing Male Figure", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Colima", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Colima", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 3/8 x 4 3/4 x 1 3/8 in. (23.8 x 12.1 x 3.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The ancient people of West Mexico focused upon the powerful bonds of familial relationships in their ceramics. Treating death not as an end of existence, but as a next stage in a larger journey, these transitional objects were made in the physical world for travel with the dead to the Underworld. Perhaps such figural ceramic groups were made to accompany the deceased into the afterlife as an extension of earthly comforts. Another, more symbolic and less personal approach interprets the ceramic groups as embodiments of agriculture, abundance or lineage. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R.T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/54.40.2_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/54.40.2_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/54.40.2_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/54.40.2_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20158", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/54.40.1-.2_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/54.40.1-.2_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/54.40.1-.2_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/54.40.1-.2_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20159", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5367, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5367", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.60", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "200 BCE - 500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "200 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "500", "Disp_Title" : "Mother and Child Figures", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Jalisco", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Jalisco", "Disp_Dimen" : "17 5/16 x 10 3/16 x 9 1/16 in. (44 x 25.8 x 23 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "17 5/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "10 3/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This depiction of a mother nursing her child embodies fertility and abundance. As humans gain sustenance and food from the earth, so the child receives life-sustaining nutrition from the mother. Modification and adornment of the body were practiced by ancient West Mexico cultures. This figure shows skull shaping, scarification (on the shoulders), teeth filing, and adornment with elaborate ear pendants and arm bands. Skull shaping was accomplished by applying pressure to boards strapped to an infant’s head, resulting in the elongation visible in these two figures. Such modifications manifest a culture’s world view and ideas concerning beauty, status and social identification. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.60_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.60_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.60_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.60_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "30515", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4897, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4897", "Disp_Access_No" : "1993.20", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "700-800", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "700", "_Disp_End_Date" : "800", "Disp_Title" : "Fragment of a Head", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Maya", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Maya", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 13/16 x 3 7/8 x 4 in. (19.8 x 9.9 x 10.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 13/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Stucco", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Stucco, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Palenque was a medium-sized Maya city that focused much of its artistic output on impressive temples and pyramids adorned with stucco sculptures. This fragment of a head, which shows traces of reddish pigment, was likely once a part of the city’s architectural adornment. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Isabel C. Herdle in memory of Gertrude Herdle Moore", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.20_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.20_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.20_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.20_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "30521", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5343, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5343", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.15", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "600-900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "600", "_Disp_End_Date" : "900", "Disp_Title" : "Seated Female Figurine Whistle", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Maya", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Maya", "Disp_Dimen" : "6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "6 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay, pigments", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Maya are noted for the realistic, lively human figures they depicted in their murals and ceramics. The many portrait-like ceramic figurine whistles found on the island of Jaina provide the modern viewer with an astounding amount of detail about the way the ancient Maya lived. The seated female figure was a popular form. Two molds were used: one for the head and one for the body. The rest of the details—elaborate beaded jewelry, loose cape, ankle-length skirt—were created by hand. The whistle is formed with a hole in the figure’s back left shoulder that leads down into its hollow body cavity. It remains a mystery why the whistle form was so common in Jaina graves. The Maya practiced body modification and adornment that reflected their standards of beauty and reinforced class lines. The elaborate jewelry was likely made of precious metals and green stone. This figure’s nose replicates the prolonged nose bridge that was produced in real life with an artificial nose piece. Between the ears and mouth are lines of scarification created by cutting or branding permanent designs into the skin. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.15_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.15_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.15_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.15_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31032", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5302, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5302", "Disp_Access_No" : "1948.9", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "600-900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "600", "_Disp_End_Date" : "900", "Disp_Title" : "Warrior Head", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Maya", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Maya", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 in. (7.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This head fragment wears an elaborate headdress and large ear ornaments. The blue pigment found on the accessories is now called Maya Blue. This color is a unique combination of indigo and a special clay that was frequently used by the Maya in their art. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R.T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/48.9_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/48.9_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/48.9_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/48.9_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31025", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5388, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5388", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.21", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "300 BCE - 300 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "300 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "300", "Disp_Title" : "Ceremonial Celt Figure", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Mezcala", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Mezcala", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 1/2 in. (8.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Stone", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Serpentine", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In Ancient America, a variety of green stones – sometimes called jadeite or jade – were highly-prized, valuable materials. While the types of stones and the actual greenness vary, a symbolic association linked them to water and plant growth. The hard stone was sculpted by abrading it with other stones, which was a slow and arduous process. The durability and strength as well as the attractive, shiny surfaces would have contributed to the overall value of green stone and these celt figures. This green stone figure is an anthropomorphized celt, or axe-head. The frequency with which the Mezcala people made celt figures with human characteristics can perhaps be explained by the animistic belief that animals, plants, rocks and objects have spirits. The celt was a multi-use working tool that was passed down through generations. Because of its highly-valued role and ancestral connotations, the celt form took on symbolic value in ritual objects, some of which were worn by individuals. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Miss Ronni Solbert", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Stonework", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.21_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.21_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.21_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.21_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20175", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5328, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5328", "Disp_Access_No" : "1958.12", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "300 BCE - 300 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "300 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "300", "Disp_Title" : "Ceremonial Celt Figure", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Mezcala", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Mezcala", "Disp_Dimen" : "6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "6 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Metadiorite", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Metadiorite", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In Ancient America, a variety of green stones – sometimes called jadeite or jade – were highly-prized, valuable materials. While the types of stones and the actual greenness vary, a symbolic association linked them to water and plant growth. The hard stone was sculpted by abrading it with other stones, which was a slow and arduous process. The durability and strength as well as the attractive, shiny surfaces would have contributed to the overall value of green stone and these celt figures. This green stone figure is an anthropomorphized celt, or axe-head. The frequency with which the Mezcala people made celt figures with human characteristics can perhaps be explained by the animistic belief that animals, plants, rocks and objects have spirits. The celt was a multi-use working tool that was passed down through generations. Because of its highly-valued role and ancestral connotations, the celt form took on symbolic value in ritual objects, some of which were worn by individuals. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Stern", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Stonework", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/58.12_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/58.12_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/58.12_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/58.12_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20160", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5339, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5339", "Disp_Access_No" : "1969.22", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1300-1500", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1300", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1500", "Disp_Title" : "Incense Burner: Figure of Macuilxóchitl", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Mixtec", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Mixtec", "Disp_Dimen" : "19 in. (48.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "19 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Macuilxochitl, whose name means “Five Flower,” was the charming Mixtec patron god of dance, feasting, love, sexuality, and summer. Representations of Macuilxochitl were favored by women for their domestic shrines. Despite the seemingly fierce appearance of this figure, Macuilxochitl is identifiable by the flowers on his headband, the white butterfly wings around his mouth, and the vertical element of his helmet representing the crest of a bird. This object would have been placed over burning incense that produced a great deal of smoke. The thick, white smoke that exited through the holes in the figure’s chest may have represented mother’s milk. The smoke that exited through the figure’s mouth may have been a form of communication with the gods. This complex object was a manifestation of life and agricultural cycles, transformation and renewal. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.22_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.22_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.22_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.22_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "30510", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5313, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5313", "Disp_Access_No" : "1954.41", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "200 BCE-600 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "200 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "600", "Disp_Title" : "Standing Female Figure", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Nayarit", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Nayarit", "Disp_Dimen" : "19 in. (48.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "19 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Beads, armbands, pendants, and ear and nose ornaments have been found on skeletal remains in Ancient American tombs. This Nayarit woman is depicted with nose, neck and ear ornaments and scarification (cutting or branding designs into the skin) on her shoulders and arms. The specificity of adornment would have associated this figure with a particular culture and class. These details contrast with an abstracted body that minimizes certain physical features while emphasizing others. The small, truncated arms are likely a stylistic convention; the wide, heavy hips and legs emphasize the woman’s connection with the earth and reproduction. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R.T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/54.41_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/54.41_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/54.41_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/54.41_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31029", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5442, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5442", "Disp_Access_No" : "1979.16", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "300-900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "300", "_Disp_End_Date" : "900", "Disp_Title" : "Warrior Figure", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Remojadas", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Remojadas", "Disp_Dimen" : "22 in. (55.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "22 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay, pigments", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This large ceramic figure’s intact survival for over a thousand years was likely due to its burial in a tomb. The figure wields a vicious-looking mace and wears black body paint common among warriors in ancient Veracruz. The appearance of its back suggests it wasn’t made to be seen from all sides, yet its size and complexity indicate it was an important object. As with many of the objects from the Ancient Americas, it remains unknown whether the figure served a purpose among the living prior to burial, and what exactly its expected role was once placed in the tomb. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "General Acquisitions Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/79.16_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/79.16_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/79.16_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/79.16_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29789", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/79.16_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/79.16_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/79.16_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/79.16_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "29790", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/79.16_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/79.16_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/79.16_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/79.16_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "29791", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5344, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5344", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.16", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "100 BCE - 600 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "100 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "600", "Disp_Title" : "Amulet Figure", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Teotihuacan", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Teotihuacan", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 3/4 in. (9.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Green stone", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Green stone", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Intermercado Limitado", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Stonework", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.16_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.16_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.16_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.16_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20170", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5349, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5349", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.34", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "300-900 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "300", "_Disp_End_Date" : "900", "Disp_Title" : "Fragment of a Yoke", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Veracruz", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Veracruz", "Disp_Dimen" : "8 3/4 in. (22.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "8 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Green stone", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Green stone", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This is a fragment of a ceremonial stone yoke. The complete yoke was modeled after the much lighter protective belts worn sideways around players’ waists in the Mesoamerican ballgame. Much of the imagery associated with the ballgame involves blood and death, as the brutal game often ended in the sacrifice of the defeated team to nourish the earth and promote fertility. Many yokes were adorned with frog-like earth monsters believed to exist at the entrance to the Underworld. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Dr. Victor Logan", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Stonework", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.34_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.34_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.34_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.34_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20187", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.34_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.34_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.34_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.34_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20188", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.34_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.34_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.34_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.34_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20189", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5340, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5340", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.14", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "600-900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "600", "_Disp_End_Date" : "900", "Disp_Title" : "Hacha", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Veracruz", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Veracruz", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 1/2 in. (19.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Stone", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Stone", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The so-called hachas of the Mesoamerican ballgame were not axes as the Spanish name implies, but were named for their sharp, thin shape. Scholars debate over whether or not stone hachas functioned as markers on the ballcourt or representations of protective gear worn by the players. Hachas are frequently heads, which when worn on a player’s yoke might have alluded to a “trophy head” of the player’s previously defeated opponents. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Stonework", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.14_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.14_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.14_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.14_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20168", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.14_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.14_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.14_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.14_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20169", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7793, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7793", "Disp_Access_No" : "1948.8", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "400-800", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "400", "_Disp_End_Date" : "800", "Disp_Title" : "Funerary Double Urn with Warrior Head", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Zapotec", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Zapotec", "Disp_Dimen" : "5 1/4 x 5 in. (13.3 x 12.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "5 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This warrior figure wears an elaborate headdress, large ear ornaments, a necklace with pectoral pendant and a loincloth. Although the two cylindrical vessels are now empty, they may have held funerary offerings believed essential to the deceased’s survival and comfort in the afterlife. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R.T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/48.8_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/48.8_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/48.8_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/48.8_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29783", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }