{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 5334, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5334", "Disp_Access_No" : "1968.44", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "600-900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "600", "_Disp_End_Date" : "900", "Disp_Title" : "Cylindrical Vase", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Maya", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Maya", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 in. (17.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Around the lip of this Maya cylindrical vase is hieroglyphic writing in what has come to be called the “primary standard sequence.” Such standardized sequences of glyphs are commonly found around the top of Maya vases from this period. These sequences have been interpreted as descriptions of the function or contents of the vessels and might even include the name of the owner or the scribe. The sequence on this pot has not yet been translated. The depiction of the seated individual includes a plumed headdress, ear ornaments, necklace and loincloth. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "Precolumbian", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/68.44_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/68.44_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/68.44_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/68.44_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "30506", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/68.44_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/68.44_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/68.44_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/68.44_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "30507", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/68.44_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/68.44_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/68.44_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/68.44_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "30508", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/68.44_A5.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/68.44_A5.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/68.44_A5.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/68.44_A5.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "30509", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4897, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4897", "Disp_Access_No" : "1993.20", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "700-800", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "700", "_Disp_End_Date" : "800", "Disp_Title" : "Fragment of a Head", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Maya", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Maya", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 13/16 x 3 7/8 x 4 in. (19.8 x 9.9 x 10.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 13/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Stucco", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Stucco, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Palenque was a medium-sized Maya city that focused much of its artistic output on impressive temples and pyramids adorned with stucco sculptures. This fragment of a head, which shows traces of reddish pigment, was likely once a part of the city’s architectural adornment. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Isabel C. Herdle in memory of Gertrude Herdle Moore", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.20_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.20_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.20_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.20_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "30521", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5343, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5343", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.15", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "600-900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "600", "_Disp_End_Date" : "900", "Disp_Title" : "Seated Female Figurine Whistle", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Maya", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Maya", "Disp_Dimen" : "6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "6 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay, pigments", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Maya are noted for the realistic, lively human figures they depicted in their murals and ceramics. The many portrait-like ceramic figurine whistles found on the island of Jaina provide the modern viewer with an astounding amount of detail about the way the ancient Maya lived. The seated female figure was a popular form. Two molds were used: one for the head and one for the body. The rest of the details—elaborate beaded jewelry, loose cape, ankle-length skirt—were created by hand. The whistle is formed with a hole in the figure’s back left shoulder that leads down into its hollow body cavity. It remains a mystery why the whistle form was so common in Jaina graves. The Maya practiced body modification and adornment that reflected their standards of beauty and reinforced class lines. The elaborate jewelry was likely made of precious metals and green stone. This figure’s nose replicates the prolonged nose bridge that was produced in real life with an artificial nose piece. Between the ears and mouth are lines of scarification created by cutting or branding permanent designs into the skin. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.15_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.15_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.15_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.15_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31032", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5332, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5332", "Disp_Access_No" : "1967.30", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 859", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "854", "_Disp_End_Date" : "864", "Disp_Title" : "Stela No. 9: Two Dancing Figures", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Maya", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Maya", "Disp_Dimen" : "51 x 37 x 7 in. (129.5 x 94 x 17.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "51 in.", "Disp_Width" : "37 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Stone", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Stone", "Info_Page_Comm" : "A stela is a sculpted stone monument with carved figures and inscriptions. The Maya often placed stela before temple or palace entrances. The one on view here was found at the portal of the main group of buildings in the Maya site of Oxkintok, Mexico by archaeologists from the Carnegie Institution of Washington in 1940. A 1940 excavation photograph (click on "view all images" above) shows the Gallery’s largely intact stela in the location where it was unearthed. This photo also shows that since its excavation in 1940 and before it was purchased by the museum in 1967, the stela suffered damage by unknown hands. The fragment of the upper panel visible in this photo was broken off and is now missing. Also damaged were the glyphs (Maya writing) between the knees of the figures, which lost some of their surface carving. What remains of the stela shows two elaborately dressed dancing figures who face each other. Three bands of glyphs are visible: the long horizontal band along the top, a vertical row between their faces and one horizontal row between their knees. The horizontal row of glyphs across the top contains the date of October 9, 859 CE. Both smaller rows are now badly abraded and difficult to identify, but the first two glyphs in the short vertical row between the figures may identify the name of the individual standing on the left as “White Jaguar.” This figure is a youthful ruler or noble, possibly in the guise of one of the legendary “Hero-Twins” who in Maya mythology traveled to the Underworld to overcome its lords. The figure on the right has been identified as God N (Pauahtun), one of the principal Maya lords of the Underworld or region of the dead. He wears feathers on his arms and carries a codex, or folding-screen book, of bark paper with a jaguar-pelt cover. Below Pauahtun is a bowl or basket containing unidentifiable objects. The upper panel that was attached to the stela in the 1940 excavation photo may have depicted an elaborately dressed dancing ruler in the world of the living as a counterpoint to the Underworld scene visible here. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Stonework", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "Precolumbian", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/67.30_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/67.30_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/67.30_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/67.30_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25585", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/67.30_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/67.30_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/67.30_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/67.30_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "31443", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "The photo from which this was scanned is in the object file. Duplicates were obtained from the Carnegie Institution, who excavated the site in 1940. This photo shows MAG''s stele in more complete form than it is now.", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/67.30_A5.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/67.30_A5.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/67.30_A5.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/67.30_A5.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "31444", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "The photo from which this was scanned is in the object file. Duplicates were obtained from the Carnegie Institution, who excavated the site in 1940. This photo shows the now missing top piece of the MAG stele.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5376, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5376", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.78", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "700-800 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "700", "_Disp_End_Date" : "800", "Disp_Title" : "Tripod Plate with God N (Pauahtun)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Maya", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Maya", "Disp_Dimen" : "4 1/4 x 15 3/4 x 15 3/4 in. (10.8 x 40 x 40 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "4 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "15 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay, pigments", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Many Maya ceramics depict deities connected with death and the Underworld. This is no surprise as such ceramics were destined as offerings to accompany the ancient Maya elite to their tombs. The theme of this tripod plate is God N or Pauahtun, one of the principal gods of the Underworld. God N is represented as an old man with toothless gums and a large, Roman nose. A common attribute is his enormous snail shell from which he crawls. A long necklace, likely made of valuable green stone hangs from his neck. The power of this Underworld lord is revealed by the “rulership” glyph (Maya writing) attached to the top of the shell. Stylized smoke is emitted by both this glyph and the shell’s spire. Not much is known about the language of Maya hand gestures, but the position of God N’s hands suggest that he is receiving homage in his palace. A representation of God N can also be found on the large stone stela in the gallery's collection from Oxkintok, Mexico (accession number 67.30). [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "Precolumbian", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.78_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.78_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.78_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.78_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20173", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.78_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.78_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.78_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.78_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20174", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5302, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5302", "Disp_Access_No" : "1948.9", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "600-900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "600", "_Disp_End_Date" : "900", "Disp_Title" : "Warrior Head", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Maya", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Maya", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 in. (7.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This head fragment wears an elaborate headdress and large ear ornaments. The blue pigment found on the accessories is now called Maya Blue. This color is a unique combination of indigo and a special clay that was frequently used by the Maya in their art. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R.T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/48.9_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/48.9_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/48.9_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/48.9_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31025", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }