{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 851, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/851", "Disp_Access_No" : "1993.14", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Crest Mask: Female Antelope (Chi Wara)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Bamana", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Bamana", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 1/2 x 7 5/8 x 8 in. (77.5 x 19.4 x 20.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, cane, shell, yarn and brass", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In many cultures, gods and spirits take the form of animals. Selected for their physical or behavioral traits, features of different animals are combined to create mythical creatures whose symbolic powers are greater than those of ordinary beasts. This antelope crest mask combines the curved horns of an antelope, the curious snout and scales of a pangolin (a kind of anteater) and the squat body of an aardvark—all animals that dig up the earth. This makes them fitting representations of Chi Wara, the supernatural being the Bamana believe taught humans to farm. The masks were worn in male/female pairs during dance performances in the fields that taught and encouraged good farming. Today, because of conversion to Islam and a variety of social changes due to westernization, the Chi Wara masquerade is now performed for entertainment and cultural pride. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Isabel C. Herdle", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Malian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.14_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.14_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.14_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.14_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28376", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.14_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.14_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.14_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.14_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28377", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.14_A5.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.14_A5.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.14_A5.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.14_A5.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28379", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On the right, with 69.107 on the left. On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4901, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4901", "Disp_Access_No" : "1967.31", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Fertility Doll (Akuaba)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "12 3/8 x 4 7/8 in. (31.4 x 12.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "12 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Fertility is a universal human concern that has long been a central issue in Africa where the infant mortality rate remains high to this day. An akuaba is a fertility talisman meant to aid an Asante woman yearning to become a mother. The horned hairdo of this akuaba is that of a priestess and indicates the child, if allowed to live, will become a priestess dedicated to a goddess. Normally it is not necessary to dedicate a child; this is more common among older women who had already lost several children. Akuaba are affectionately bathed, dressed, fed and carried by women as they would a living child. Their slight, flat shape is designed to be carried on a woman’s back in her cloth wrapper. When the woman’s child survives childhood, the akuaba is sometimes placed in a shrine as an offering of thanks to the god responsible. Almost all of these fertility dolls are female as the Asante are a matrilineal society and most women wish for daughters to carry on their family line. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "General Acquisitions Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/67.31_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/67.31_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/67.31_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/67.31_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25513", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/67.31_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/67.31_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/67.31_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/67.31_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25514", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4905, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4905", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.19", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Female Figure (Akuaba)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 1/2 x 4 1/4 in. (26.7 x 10.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Asante women often carry dolls called akuaba to encourage fertility and ensure the health and beauty of the child. The figure is placed at an altar or held in the wrappers of a woman's clothing, treated as a real child until pregnancy occurs. If the resulting child dies, the akuaba might be kept as a memorial to the infant. Akuabas are representative of ideal beauty, demonstrating round or oval heads with high foreheads, and long necks with excess fat, indicating a good state of health. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Nathaniel T. Whitcomb", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.19_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.19_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.19_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.19_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25523", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.19_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.19_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.19_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.19_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25524", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4906, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4906", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.20", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Fertility Doll (Akuaba)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 x 3 5/8 in. (25.4 x 9.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood and beads", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Fertility is a universal human concern that has long been a central issue in Africa where the infant mortality rate remains high to this day. An akuaba is a fertility talisman meant to aid an Asante woman yearning to become a mother. Akuaba are affectionately bathed, dressed, fed and carried by women as they would a living child. Their slight, flat shape is designed to be carried on a woman’s back in her cloth wrapper. When the woman’s child survives childhood, the akuaba is sometimes placed in a shrine as an offering of thanks to the god responsible. Almost all of these fertility dolls are female as the Asante are a matrilineal society and most women wish for daughters to carry on their family line. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Nathaniel T. Whitcomb", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Note that incoming 6015 lists "Ashanti fertility dolls," plural, coming from Harris Prior for loan and ultimately gift to the permanent collection-- were there others besides this one?", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.20_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.20_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.20_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.20_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25525", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.20_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.20_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.20_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.20_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25526", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4910, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4910", "Disp_Access_No" : "1969.107", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Crest Mask: Male Antelope (Chi Wara)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Bamana", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Bamana", "Disp_Dimen" : "40 9/16 x 2 15/16 x 13 9/16 in. (103 x 7.5 x 34.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "40 9/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 15/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, fiber, and metal", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In many cultures, gods and spirits take the form of animals. Selected for their physical or behavioral traits, features of different animals are combined to create mythical creatures whose symbolic powers are greater than those of ordinary beasts. This antelope crest mask combines the curved horns of an antelope, the curious snout and scales of a pangolin (a kind of anteater) and the squat body of an aardvark—all animals that dig up the earth. This makes the mask a fitting representations of Chi Wara, the supernatural being the Bamana believe taught humans to farm. Chi wara masks were worn in male/female pairs during dance performances in the fields that taught and encouraged good farming. Today, because of conversion to Islam and a variety of social changes due to westernization, the Chi Wara masquerade is now performed for entertainment and cultural pride. The small pieces of red cloth attached to the snout of this male Chi Wara may have originated in the woolen bandages imported by the French during the First World War. In Bamana culture, red is the color of danger and is often restricted to men of certain status. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Malian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.107_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.107_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.107_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.107_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28367", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.107_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.107_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.107_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.107_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28368", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.107_A6.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.107_A6.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.107_A6.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.107_A6.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28370", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "At the left, with 93.14 on the right. On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 6352, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/6352", "Disp_Access_No" : "1983.17", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1895", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1905", "Disp_Title" : "Man and Woman in Canoe with Totemic Animals", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Haida", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Haida", "Disp_Dimen" : "4 x 2 1/4 x 13 7/8 in. (10.2 x 5.7 x 35.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Stone", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Argillite", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Argillite, a fine-grained sedimentary rock sometimes called “black slate,” is mined in the Queen Charlotte Islands, the only mineable source in North America. These small and easily transportable sculptures were first made by the Haida in the early 19th century for trade with outsiders. Here the canoe is filled with a raven, a bear and two human paddlers. The animals are totemic figures, relating to matrilineal clans; the human figure with longer hair may be a shaman. These sculptures are still being made today in an array of figure groupings and materials. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Nathaniel T. Whitcomb", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.17_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.17_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.17_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.17_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25830", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.17_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.17_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.17_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.17_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25831", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 6881, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/6881", "Disp_Access_No" : "1983.38", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "20th Century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1900", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1999", "Disp_Title" : "Hastakara Yantra: the Hand", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Indian", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Indian", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 3/4 x 6 3/8 in. (24.8 x 16.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "6 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "with mount", "Medium" : "Opaque watercolor", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Opaque watercolor and ink on thin bluish laid paper, pasted down to cream paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "A yantra is a ritual, mystical diagram rooted in the beliefs and concepts contained in a number of the Hindu Tantras, or collections of esoteric texts that emphasize the science of the knowledge of interplanetary rhythms and their integral relations with the human organism. Tantric thought is based in the belief that creative energy flow is achieved through the resolution of polar opposites. The Hastakara Yantra illustrates these concepts through various symbols and signs on the palm of a hand. In this yantra, the dominant symbols are animals, elements of script and swords, which represent prosperity, power and fortune. ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Helen H. Reiff in memory of Robert F. Reiff", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Indian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.38_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.38_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.38_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.38_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37212", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7404, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7404", "Disp_Access_No" : "1972.53", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Face Mask with Hinged Jaw (Elu)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Ogoni", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Ogoni", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 1/2 x 4 3/4 x 4 5/8 in. (19.1 x 12.1 x 11.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment and fiber", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The white face of this Ogoni mask is associated with the youthfulness of benevolent spirits. As positive forces, elu are entertainers and are performed by young men on multiple occasions throughout the year. These unusually small masks perch on the front of the dancer’s face attached to a woven head piece. The mask is further animated when the dancer, clenching in his teeth a stick attached to its back, opens and closes the hinged jaw. The bowler hat is typical of this type of mask, as elu often depict hairstyles and fashions current at the time. In the early 20th century when this mask was carved, the Ogoni were involved in trading palm oil (for cooking) and gained exposure to this European style. These bowler hats became desirable prestige items for the Ogoni. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Nigerian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/72.53_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/72.53_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/72.53_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/72.53_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25522", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/72.53_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/72.53_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/72.53_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/72.53_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25521", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7406, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7406", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.114", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Pendant Amulet (Ikhoko)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Western Pende", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Western Pende", "Disp_Dimen" : "2 1/4 x 1 1/4 x 1 in. (5.7 x 3.2 x 2.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "2 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "1 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Ivory", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Ivory", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This amulet was worn around the neck of a young Pende man beginning with his initiation into the men’s secret society and remaining as a part of his personal adornment for life. This face is a smaller version of the masks worn during initiation and would later act as a reminder to the wearer of the moral codes instilled in those formative ceremonies. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R.T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Jewelry", "Creation_Place2" : "Democratic Republic of the Congo", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.114_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.114_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.114_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.114_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "17007", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7407, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7407", "Disp_Access_No" : "1969.72", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Rhythm Pounder (Deble)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Senufo", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Senufo", "Disp_Dimen" : "42 1/2 in. (108 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "42 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In many African societies, life on earth is seen as part of a continuum that permits movement between the spirit and earthly worlds. As ancestors are in a position to assist the living, they must be respected and attended to. The rhythm pounders of the Senufo originally functioned as communication devices in calling the spirits of ancestors to participate in funerals. Held by the upper arms, the rhythm pounder’s thick base is thumped into the earth in rhythm with the sounds of chants, drums and rattles. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.72_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.72_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.72_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.72_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28660", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.72_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.72_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.72_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.72_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28661", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7422, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7422", "Disp_Access_No" : "1965.9.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Twin Figure (Ere Ibeji)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Yoruba", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Yoruba", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 3/8 x 2 5/8 x 2 3/4 in. (23.8 x 6.7 x 7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment, beads, cowrie shells, fiber, sacrificial materials", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Yoruba have one of the highest rates of twinning in the world. Twins are endowed with powerful attributes, both auspicious and dangerous. Due to the high mortality rate of twins, when one or both dies, Yoruba mothers procure small wooden statues (ere ibeji) to house the spirits of the deceased. If there is a single ibeji, it is likely that one twin died and one survived. If there are two ibeji figures, then it is likely that both twins died. Wealthy women clothe their ere ibeji in beaded or shelled vests. Surface accumulation and signs of wear are common as ibeji figures are cared for in the same manner as a living child and are handled, clothed, washed, fed and honored with dances and songs. Lyrics from a Yoruba song explain how the care of ere ibeji can control the potentially negative influence of twins’ spirits, “Abuse me and I shall follow you home. Praise me and I shall leave you alone.” Subsequent generations inherit the care of ere ibeji from their ancestors. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Nigerian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.1_A5.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.1_A5.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.1_A5.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.1_A5.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25506", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.1_A6.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.1_A6.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.1_A6.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.1_A6.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25507", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25508", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7424, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7424", "Disp_Access_No" : "1965.9.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Twin Figure (Ere Ibeji)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Yoruba", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Yoruba", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 1/4 x 2 5/8 x 2 5/8 in. (23.5 x 6.7 x 6.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment, beads, cowrie shells, fiber, sacrificial materials", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Yoruba have one of the highest rates of twinning in the world. Twins are endowed with powerful attributes, both auspicious and dangerous. Due to the high mortality rate of twins, when one or both dies, Yoruba mothers procure small wooden statues (ere ibeji) to house the spirits of the deceased. If there is a single ibeji, it is likely that one twin died and one survived. If there are two ibeji figures, then it is likely that both twins died. Wealthy women clothe their ere ibeji in beaded or shelled vests. Surface accumulation and signs of wear are common as ibeji figures are cared for in the same manner as a living child and are handled, clothed, washed, fed and honored with dances and songs. Lyrics from a Yoruba song explain how the care of ere ibeji can control the potentially negative influence of twins’ spirits, “Abuse me and I shall follow you home. Praise me and I shall leave you alone.” Subsequent generations inherit the care of ere ibeji from their ancestors. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Nigerian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.2_A7.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.2_A7.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.2_A7.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.2_A7.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25509", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.2_A8.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.2_A8.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.2_A8.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.2_A8.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25510", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25511", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7714, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7714", "Disp_Access_No" : "1998.81", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Hanukkiah", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "David Palombo", "Sort_Artist" : "Palombo, David", "Disp_Dimen" : "", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wrought iron", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wrought iron and stone", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Roberta Wilson and Dorothy Silber in memory of Zelda Hart", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Israeli", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Per research done by Marjorie Searl, spelling of artist''s last name has been changed from Polombo to Palombo. April 29, 2011.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/98.81_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/98.81_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/98.81_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/98.81_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "40252", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7824, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7824", "Disp_Access_No" : "1970.82", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Hook Figure (Yipwon)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Arambak", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Arambak", "Disp_Dimen" : "85 in. (215.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "85 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, shell", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This hook figure, or yipwon, is a 20th century reproduction of old, powerful figures believed to guide and assist tribes in hunting and warfare. The hooks represent ribs which surround the central element of the heart. The large yipwon were kept in the sacred space of the Men’s House where it acted as a vessel to house primordial ancestral spirits. These spirits were called into the yipwon prior to battle by a senior man who activated the figure by rubbing it with powerful substances. If the battle was a success, returning warriors smeared it with the blood of their victims. Particularly effective yipwon were handed down for generations. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.82_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.82_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.82_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.82_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26795", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }