{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 9736, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/9736", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.172", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1917", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1917", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1917", "Disp_Title" : "Poster: Lend the way they Fight - Buy Bonds to your UTMOST", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Edmund (Edward) M. Ashe", "Sort_Artist" : "Ashe, Edmund (Edward) M.", "Disp_Dimen" : "41 1/4 x 27 1/4 in. (104.8 x 69.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "41 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "27 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "American World War I posters depicting men, while idealized, often focused on real life figures like soldiers, workers, and fathers. Women, on the other hand, were most often represented as personifications - of our country, humanity, or the Red Cross. This poster moves beyond the abstract realm and thrusts the viewer into a gritty reality. A torn and tattered soldier fights for his life on the battlefield. Wielding both rifle and grenade, this dynamic figure fearlessly crosses "No Man's Land" to attack the enemy trench. A reminder to those at home-men are giving their lives in the trenches, the least you can do is lend your money to support their sacrifices. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Dr. and Mrs. E. Henry Keutmann", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "1917 date per Library of Congress website [http://memory.loc.gov/pp/wwiposhtml/wwiposabt.html]", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.172_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.172_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.172_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.172_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "22126", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "This poster was photographed in preparation for research use for Lockhart exhibit on WWI posters in October 2006. This image can be used for web display. ", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 9744, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/9744", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.180", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1918", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1918", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1918", "Disp_Title" : "Poster: Clear-The-Way!! Buy Bonds - Fourth Liberty Loan", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Howard Chandler Christy", "Sort_Artist" : "Christy, Howard Chandler", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 x 20 in. (76.2 x 50.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Christy Girl-part goddess, part girl-next-door-was a popular figure created by illustrator Howard Chandler Christy. In his war posters, the artist often used the Christy Girl, plus a heady dose of sex appeal, to convey the message "real men go to war." In Clear-The-Way!! Columbia wears an alluring, diaphanous white dress as she presides over muscled, testosterone-fueled soldiers manning guns on a ship. The contradiction is palpable; Columbia calls the virile soldiers to war as her soft lines and open mouth beckon to the viewer. [Gallery label text, 2006] Printed by Forbes, Boston.", "Dedication" : "Gift of Dr. and Mrs. E. Henry Keutmann", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.180_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.180_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.180_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.180_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "22142", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "This poster was photographed in preparation for research use for Lockhart exhibit on WWI posters in October 2006. This image can be used for web display. ", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 9729, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/9729", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.165", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1917", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1917", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1917", "Disp_Title" : "Poster: The Sword is Drawn...The Navy Upholds It!", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Kenyon Cox", "Sort_Artist" : "Cox, Kenyon", "Disp_Dimen" : "42 1/16 x 28 1/16 in. (106.8 x 71.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "42 1/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "28 1/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Columbia (the female personification of the United States of America) is strong and powerful in this Navy recruiting poster. The bold and graphic style of the poster contributes to the sense of her overwhelming presence. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Dr. and Mrs. E. Henry Keutmann", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "1917 date per Library of Congress website [http://memory.loc.gov/pp/wwiposhtml/wwiposabt.html]", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.165_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.165_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.165_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.165_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "22170", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "This poster was photographed in preparation for research use for Lockhart exhibit on WWI posters in October 2006. This image can be used for web display. ", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1636, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1636", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.77", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1918", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1918", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1918", "Disp_Title" : "Poster: Books Wanted for Our Men in Camp And "Over There" ", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Books Wanted For Our Men In Camp And "Over There" - Take Your Gifts To The Public Library", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Charles Buckles Falls", "Sort_Artist" : "Falls, Charles Buckles", "Disp_Dimen" : "41 3/4 x 28 in. (106 x 71.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "41 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "28 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "wove paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The vertical, smiling soldier in Books Wanted highlights the soldier's intellectual and emotional needs. Falls was a master at using composition, color and text to make his posters to convey a message. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.77_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.77_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.77_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.77_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "22178", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "This poster was photographed in preparation for research use for Lockhart exhibit on WWI posters in October 2006. This image can be used for web display. ", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1633, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1633", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.50", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1917", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1917", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1917", "Disp_Title" : "Poster: I Want You For U.S. Army", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "James Montgomery Flagg", "Sort_Artist" : "Flagg, James Montgomery", "Disp_Dimen" : "", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In the most famous of American recruiting posters, Uncle Sam (the male personification of the United States of America) demands your participation in the U.S. Army. The Army printed over four million copies of I Want You during the First World War. James Montgomery Flagg's depiction of Uncle Sam, reportedly modeled on the artists' own features, has become iconic. Uncle Sam's paternal appearance and forceful call to action heroized soldiers and one's duty to the country. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Merritt", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "1917 date per Library of Congress website [http://memory.loc.gov/pp/wwiposhtml/wwiposabt.html]", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.50_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.50_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.50_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.50_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "22899", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 9733, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/9733", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.169", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1917", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1917", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1917", "Disp_Title" : "Poster: Wake Up, America! Civilization Calls Every Man, Woman and Child!", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "James Montgomery Flagg", "Sort_Artist" : "Flagg, James Montgomery", "Disp_Dimen" : "42 x 28 1/8 in. (106.7 x 71.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "42 in.", "Disp_Width" : "28 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "A personification is an artistic representation of an abstract quality or idea as a person. Traditional personifications of the United States, like Uncle Sam and Columbia/America, were common in war propaganda. Columbia is a conflicting presence in American World War I posters; sometimes she is pliant and beckoning, other times solid and fearsome. The preponderance of idealized females in WWI posters, in comparison to the few representations of "real" women, contradicted the reality of American women's growing participation in factories, farms, and hospitals. In Wake Up, America!, America dozes while the fires of war rage in the distance. Her feminine, passive characteristics-soft arms, limp hand, and white, exposed neck-are an indictment in this poster. The artist, James Montgomery Flagg, admonishes Americans to wake up and prepare for war. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Dr. and Mrs. E. Henry Keutmann", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.169_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.169_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.169_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.169_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "22165", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "This poster was photographed in preparation for research use for Lockhart exhibit on WWI posters in October 2006. This image can be used for web display. ", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 9739, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/9739", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.175", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1918", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1918", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1918", "Disp_Title" : "Poster: For Home and Country - Victory Liberty Loan", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Alfred Everitt Orr", "Sort_Artist" : "Orr, Alfred Everitt", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 x 20 in. (76.2 x 50.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "During five Liberty Loan campaigns, Americans bought twenty billion dollars in bonds to support the war. The final campaign, the Victory Liberty Loan, began after the war ended. The government still needed to pay for the travel, medical care, shelter, and sustenance for the millions of American soldiers remaining in Europe. The reunion of this idealized, Anglo-American family illustrates the ideal outcome of the war. A healthy soldier/husband returns from the war into the loving arms of his wife and son. The German helmet that hangs from the soldier's neck, a common war trophy, strikes a somewhat brutal and discordant note to our modern eyes. [Gallery label text, 2006] Printed by American Lithographic Co., New York.", "Dedication" : "Gift of Dr. and Mrs. E. Henry Keutmann", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "1918 date per Library of Congress website [http://memory.loc.gov/pp/wwiposhtml/wwiposabt.html]", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.175_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.175_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.175_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.175_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "22131", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "This photograph was taken in preparing for a WWI posters Lockhart show to open October 2006. This photograph can be used for web display. ", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2199, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2199", "Disp_Access_No" : "1972.66", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1918", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1918", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1918", "Disp_Title" : "Poster: The Girl on the Land Serves the Nation's Need - Apply Y.W.C.A.", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Poster: The Girl on the Land Serves the Nation's Need - Apply Y.W.C.A. - Land Service Committee", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Edward Penfield", "Sort_Artist" : "Penfield, Edward", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 3/4 x 30 in. (62.9 x 76.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "30 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "America's youth were encouraged to participate in supporting the war. Groups like the Boys' Working Reserve and the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) Land Service Committee trained young men and women to relieve the labor shortage on America's farms. In The Girl on the Land, artist Edward Penfield emphasizes the serenity of the scene with cool, bucolic greens and yellows. Far from the battlefield, America's young women serve their nation's need for food production through camaraderie and mutual support. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "1918 date per Library of Congress website [http://memory.loc.gov/pp/wwiposhtml/wwiposabt.html]", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/72.66_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/72.66_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/72.66_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/72.66_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "22177", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "This poster was photographed in preparation for research use for Lockhart exhibit on WWI posters in October 2006. This image can be used for web display. ", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2385, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2385", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.26.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1918", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1918", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1918", "Disp_Title" : "Poster: Have YOU a Red Cross Service Flag?", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Jessie Willcox Smith", "Sort_Artist" : "Smith, Jessie Willcox", "Disp_Dimen" : "28 x 21 in. (71.1 x 53.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "28 in.", "Disp_Width" : "21 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Printed by Forbes, Boston", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Albert B. Irwin", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "1918 date per Library of Congress website [http://memory.loc.gov/pp/wwiposhtml/wwiposabt.html]", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.26.1_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.26.1_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.26.1_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.26.1_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "22176", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "This poster was photographed in preparation for research use for Lockhart exhibit on WWI posters in October 2006. This image can be used for web display. ", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11929, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11929", "Disp_Access_No" : "2003.50", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1919", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1919", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1919", "Disp_Title" : "Street in Verdun", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John C. Wenrich", "Sort_Artist" : "Wenrich, John C.", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 5/16 x 11 1/8 in. (18.5 x 28.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 5/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "11 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Gouache", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Gouache with graphite on paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "After the war, John Wenrich stayed in Europe and sketched the cities and landscapes of France. In this bleak sketch of the French city of Verdun, dated January 18, 1919, Wenrich captured the devastation of modern warfare; a sight most Americans had little experience viewing first hand. The Battle of Verdun, a year-long battle that ended before America entered the war, resulted in nearly one million casualties and was the bloodiest battle of the war. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Gift of John A. and Jeanne P. Wenrich", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2003.50_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2003.50_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2003.50_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2003.50_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "18787", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11928, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11928", "Disp_Access_No" : "2003.98", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1919", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1919", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1919", "Disp_Title" : "War Torn Country Near Verdun", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John C. Wenrich", "Sort_Artist" : "Wenrich, John C.", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 1/4 x 11 5/8 in. (23.5 x 29.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "11 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Graphite", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Graphite with gouache on paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "After the war, John Wenrich stayed in Europe and sketched the cities and landscapes of France. In this bleak sketch of the French city of Verdun, dated January 18, 1919, Wenrich captured the devastation of modern warfare; a sight most Americans had little experience viewing first hand. The Battle of Verdun, a year-long battle that ended before America entered the war, resulted in nearly one million casualties and was the bloodiest battle of the war. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Gift of John A. and Jeanne P. Wenrich", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2003.98_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2003.98_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2003.98_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2003.98_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "18819", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11953, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11953", "Disp_Access_No" : "2003.75", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1918", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1918", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1918", "Disp_Title" : "Where We Stopped", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John C. Wenrich", "Sort_Artist" : "Wenrich, John C.", "Disp_Dimen" : "5 1/4 x 8 in. (13.3 x 20.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "5 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "image", "Medium" : "Graphite", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Graphite on paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "One and a half years after the United States entered the war, the Armistice put an end to the battle at 11:00 a.m. on November 11, 1918. Rochester artist and soldier, John C. Wenrich, documented the hillside where he and his battalion "stopped" at the moment the Armistice called an end to the brutal and bloody war. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Gift of John A. and Jeanne P. Wenrich", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2003.75_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2003.75_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2003.75_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2003.75_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "18509", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }