{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 4901, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4901", "Disp_Access_No" : "1967.31", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Fertility Doll (Akuaba)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "12 3/8 x 4 7/8 in. (31.4 x 12.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "12 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Fertility is a universal human concern that has long been a central issue in Africa where the infant mortality rate remains high to this day. An akuaba is a fertility talisman meant to aid an Asante woman yearning to become a mother. The horned hairdo of this akuaba is that of a priestess and indicates the child, if allowed to live, will become a priestess dedicated to a goddess. Normally it is not necessary to dedicate a child; this is more common among older women who had already lost several children. Akuaba are affectionately bathed, dressed, fed and carried by women as they would a living child. Their slight, flat shape is designed to be carried on a woman’s back in her cloth wrapper. When the woman’s child survives childhood, the akuaba is sometimes placed in a shrine as an offering of thanks to the god responsible. Almost all of these fertility dolls are female as the Asante are a matrilineal society and most women wish for daughters to carry on their family line. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "General Acquisitions Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/67.31_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/67.31_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/67.31_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/67.31_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25513", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/67.31_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/67.31_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/67.31_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/67.31_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25514", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4906, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4906", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.20", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Fertility Doll (Akuaba)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 x 3 5/8 in. (25.4 x 9.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood and beads", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Fertility is a universal human concern that has long been a central issue in Africa where the infant mortality rate remains high to this day. An akuaba is a fertility talisman meant to aid an Asante woman yearning to become a mother. Akuaba are affectionately bathed, dressed, fed and carried by women as they would a living child. Their slight, flat shape is designed to be carried on a woman’s back in her cloth wrapper. When the woman’s child survives childhood, the akuaba is sometimes placed in a shrine as an offering of thanks to the god responsible. Almost all of these fertility dolls are female as the Asante are a matrilineal society and most women wish for daughters to carry on their family line. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Nathaniel T. Whitcomb", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Note that incoming 6015 lists "Ashanti fertility dolls," plural, coming from Harris Prior for loan and ultimately gift to the permanent collection-- were there others besides this one?", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.20_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.20_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.20_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.20_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25525", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.20_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.20_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.20_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.20_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25526", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4902, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4902", "Disp_Access_No" : "1970.62", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Female Figure with Child", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 1/4 x 3 3/4 x 3 7/8 in. (28.6 x 9.5 x 9.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, iron, sacrificial materials", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This is likely a representation of the Asante Queen Mother, a female relative of the king who has the authority to nominate his successor. The infant’s dependence on the mother for nourishment and protection symbolizes the kingdom’s dependence upon the Queen Mother for guidance. Associated with earth goddesses, agriculture and fertility, this Queen Mother figure was probably kept as part of a fertility shrine where sacrificial offerings were made (remnants of eggshell still remain on her surface). Scholars are confused by the weapon in the mother’s hand and think perhaps it was added at a later date. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.62_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.62_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.62_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.62_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25515", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.62_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.62_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.62_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.62_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25516", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.62_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.62_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.62_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.62_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25517", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4900, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4900", "Disp_Access_No" : "1962.24", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Stool", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 3/4 x 18 x 9 in. (27.3 x 45.7 x 22.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "18 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In many African cultures, objects (such as carved figures and masks) can act as physical surrogates for spirits wishing to communicate and interact with the living. Stools are central objects in Asante spirituality. The Asante believe the stool used in life houses the owner’s soul in death. This is based in the story of The Golden Stool that descended from the heavens to land in (and thereby legitimize) the lap of the first Asante king. The Asante saying goes, “A man with no stool is a man with no dignity.” [Gallery label text, 2009] The treatment of stools as sacred objects is unique to the Asante kingdom - an Akan empire founded by the great leader Osei Tutu in the late seventeenth century. The tradition began with the great Golden Stool which legend relates floated down from the sky and fell in the lap of Osei Tutu. To this day, the Golden Stool stands as a representation of the soul, or spirit (sunsum) of the Asante people. It is not a throne, but rather a powerful, sacred object, that is guarded by each successive king and forbidden to be sat upon or to touch the ground. The most lavish stools are rewarded to important chiefs or members of the royal court, but commoners also maintain more modest stools. The stool is said to absorb some of the sunsum, or spirit, of his owner. Such an intimate link between owner and stool is reflected in the treatment of the stool after the owner's death. A high official's stool is linked to his role in office and when the owner dies, it is said that "a stool has fallen." The stool is then "blackened" and kept on its side in a separate "stool room." The soul of the ancestor is said to be embodied in the blackened stool. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Anonymous gift", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/62.24_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/62.24_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/62.24_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/62.24_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25502", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4899, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4899", "Disp_Access_No" : "1953.76.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Goldweight", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "1 1/4 x 1 3/8 x 5/8 in. (3.2 x 3.5 x 1.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "1 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "1 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Brass", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Brass", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Fueled by rich deposits of gold, the Asante engaged in extensive trade relations with European and African nations. Buyers and vendors used brass weights such as these to counterbalance gold dust on scales. Each Asante family had their own set of brass pieces. Unsurprisingly the vendors’ weights were often too heavy and the buyer’s weights too light. Many goldweights represented local proverbs with social or moral meanings that served as ethical reminders during the sometimes fraught ordeal of gold-weighing. If this weight was associated with a proverb, the cultural association has been lost to us. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R. T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Metalwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.76.2_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.76.2_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.76.2_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.76.2_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "29251", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Temporary image, do not use for web or print", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4891, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4891", "Disp_Access_No" : "1953.76.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Goldweight", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "1 5/8 x 1 1/8 x 1/2 in. (4.1 x 2.9 x 1.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "1 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "1 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Brass", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Brass", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Fueled by rich deposits of gold, the Asante engaged in extensive trade relations with European and African nations. Buyers and vendors used brass weights such as these to counterbalance gold dust on scales. Each Asante family had their own set of brass pieces. Unsurprisingly the vendors’ weights were often too heavy and the buyer’s weights too light. Many goldweights represented local proverbs with social or moral meanings that served as ethical reminders during the sometimes fraught ordeal of gold-weighing. If this weight was associated with a proverb, the cultural association has been lost to us. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R. T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Metalwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.76.1_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.76.1_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.76.1_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.76.1_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "29250", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Temporary image, do not use for web or print", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }