{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 14287, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14287", "Disp_Access_No" : "2006.40", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2002", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2002", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2002", "Disp_Title" : "Sears Ross tji wara (mother and child)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Willie Cole", "Sort_Artist" : "Cole, Willie", "Disp_Dimen" : "47 x 26 x 7 3/4 in. (119.4 x 66 x 19.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "47 in.", "Disp_Width" : "26 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Mixed media", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Bicycle parts", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Willie Cole’s work explores areas of overlap and intersection among African, American and African American cultures. Cole makes his art from the reused detritus (otherwise known as garbage) of contemporary life. In this sculpture of old bicycle parts, the artist reinterprets the tji wara (also spelled chi wara) masks of the Bamana people of Mali (like MAG's accession number 93.14). With real-time communication, social networking and economic globalization, the internet of the 21st century fosters seamless and near-constant encounters across time and cultures. By Africanizing or ritualizing common western objects, Cole embraces and examines these encounters as he comments upon contemporary society. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Maurice R. and Maxine B. Forman Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2006.40_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2006.40_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2006.40_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2006.40_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "23341", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "No master scan with color bars exists.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4798, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4798", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.13", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1910-1914", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1910", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1914", "Disp_Title" : "Veranda Post", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Olowe of Ise", "Sort_Artist" : "Ise, Olowe of", "Disp_Dimen" : "56 x 132 x 10 in. (142.2 x 335.3 x 25.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "56 in.", "Disp_Width" : "132 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "maximum", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "A royal wife stands with her hands resting on the heads of her twin daughters who hold their breasts in a Yoruba gesture of greeting, devotion and humility. This post was carved to decorate a courtyard veranda in the palace of the Ogoga of Ikere, one of the kings of Yorubaland. The courtyard served as an official area where the king received important visitors and conducted affairs of state. It was important that he show off his wealth, power and sophistication in this space. This veranda post was carved by one of the most renowned sculptors in Africa, Olowe of Ise. His sculptures were so beautiful that some people believed Olowe harnessed the power of spirits who carved for him. Elaborate hairstyles and scarification patterns (look at the royal wife’s back) demonstrate Olowe’s technical mastery and reflect Yoruba standards of beauty. Traces of layered pigments indicate that these were once brightly painted and regularly refurbished. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Nigerian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "The piece was still in situ until at least 1964 (see photo in situ in 1998 "Olowe of Ise" exhibition brochure in curatorial file).", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.13_A6.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.13_A6.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.13_A6.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.13_A6.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "38870", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Scanned from transparency and background masked out by Andy Olenick.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7457, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7457", "Disp_Access_No" : "1983.82", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Polar Bear with Shaman", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Davidee Piungitu", "Sort_Artist" : "Piungitu, Davidee", "Disp_Dimen" : "2 1/4 x 5 3/4 x 12 1/4 in. (5.7 x 14.6 x 31.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "2 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Stone", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Soapstone", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This piece is relatively recent and may represent an inua or spirit/soul of a bear in human form. A label on the bottom of the piece links it to Canadian Arctic Producers (CAP), a government-initiated cooperative established in 1965 to market the work of the aboriginal people of northern Canada. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Harmar Brereton", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.82_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.82_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.82_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.82_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25832", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.82_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.82_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.82_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.82_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25833", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7838, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7838", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.78", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Yam Mask", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Abelam", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Abelam", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 3/4 x 12 1/4 x 2 1/4 in. (29.8 x 31.1 x 5.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "12 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Grasses", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Grass, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Abelam yam masks were never worn by humans. They are so small because they were made to adorn the long yams grown by the Abelam people of Papua New Guinea. These long yams, which were not eaten, grow up to 6-9 feet and were exchanged between men as a form of community building. An Abelam man’s prestige was measured in direct proportion to the size of his yams. Special long yams with anthropomorphic features were considered living supernatural beings and were lavishly decorated with paint, feathers, shells, leaves, and masks, and then publicly displayed. The interlacing between solid bands refers to the caterpillar found on yam vines. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.78_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.78_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.78_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.78_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26803", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4901, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4901", "Disp_Access_No" : "1967.31", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Fertility Doll (Akuaba)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "12 3/8 x 4 7/8 in. (31.4 x 12.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "12 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Fertility is a universal human concern that has long been a central issue in Africa where the infant mortality rate remains high to this day. An akuaba is a fertility talisman meant to aid an Asante woman yearning to become a mother. The horned hairdo of this akuaba is that of a priestess and indicates the child, if allowed to live, will become a priestess dedicated to a goddess. Normally it is not necessary to dedicate a child; this is more common among older women who had already lost several children. Akuaba are affectionately bathed, dressed, fed and carried by women as they would a living child. Their slight, flat shape is designed to be carried on a woman’s back in her cloth wrapper. When the woman’s child survives childhood, the akuaba is sometimes placed in a shrine as an offering of thanks to the god responsible. Almost all of these fertility dolls are female as the Asante are a matrilineal society and most women wish for daughters to carry on their family line. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "General Acquisitions Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/67.31_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/67.31_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/67.31_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/67.31_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25513", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/67.31_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/67.31_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/67.31_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/67.31_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25514", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7824, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7824", "Disp_Access_No" : "1970.82", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Hook Figure (Yipwon)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Arambak", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Arambak", "Disp_Dimen" : "85 in. (215.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "85 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, shell", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This hook figure, or yipwon, is a 20th century reproduction of old, powerful figures believed to guide and assist tribes in hunting and warfare. The hooks represent ribs which surround the central element of the heart. The large yipwon were kept in the sacred space of the Men’s House where it acted as a vessel to house primordial ancestral spirits. These spirits were called into the yipwon prior to battle by a senior man who activated the figure by rubbing it with powerful substances. If the battle was a success, returning warriors smeared it with the blood of their victims. Particularly effective yipwon were handed down for generations. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.82_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.82_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.82_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.82_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26795", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4906, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4906", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.20", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Fertility Doll (Akuaba)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 x 3 5/8 in. (25.4 x 9.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood and beads", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Fertility is a universal human concern that has long been a central issue in Africa where the infant mortality rate remains high to this day. An akuaba is a fertility talisman meant to aid an Asante woman yearning to become a mother. Akuaba are affectionately bathed, dressed, fed and carried by women as they would a living child. Their slight, flat shape is designed to be carried on a woman’s back in her cloth wrapper. When the woman’s child survives childhood, the akuaba is sometimes placed in a shrine as an offering of thanks to the god responsible. Almost all of these fertility dolls are female as the Asante are a matrilineal society and most women wish for daughters to carry on their family line. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Nathaniel T. Whitcomb", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Note that incoming 6015 lists "Ashanti fertility dolls," plural, coming from Harris Prior for loan and ultimately gift to the permanent collection-- were there others besides this one?", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.20_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.20_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.20_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.20_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25525", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.20_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.20_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.20_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.20_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25526", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4902, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4902", "Disp_Access_No" : "1970.62", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Female Figure with Child", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 1/4 x 3 3/4 x 3 7/8 in. (28.6 x 9.5 x 9.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, iron, sacrificial materials", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This is likely a representation of the Asante Queen Mother, a female relative of the king who has the authority to nominate his successor. The infant’s dependence on the mother for nourishment and protection symbolizes the kingdom’s dependence upon the Queen Mother for guidance. Associated with earth goddesses, agriculture and fertility, this Queen Mother figure was probably kept as part of a fertility shrine where sacrificial offerings were made (remnants of eggshell still remain on her surface). Scholars are confused by the weapon in the mother’s hand and think perhaps it was added at a later date. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.62_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.62_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.62_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.62_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25515", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.62_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.62_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.62_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.62_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25516", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.62_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.62_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.62_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.62_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25517", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4910, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4910", "Disp_Access_No" : "1969.107", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Crest Mask: Male Antelope (Chi Wara)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Bamana", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Bamana", "Disp_Dimen" : "40 9/16 x 2 15/16 x 13 9/16 in. (103 x 7.5 x 34.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "40 9/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 15/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, fiber, and metal", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In many cultures, gods and spirits take the form of animals. Selected for their physical or behavioral traits, features of different animals are combined to create mythical creatures whose symbolic powers are greater than those of ordinary beasts. This antelope crest mask combines the curved horns of an antelope, the curious snout and scales of a pangolin (a kind of anteater) and the squat body of an aardvark—all animals that dig up the earth. This makes the mask a fitting representations of Chi Wara, the supernatural being the Bamana believe taught humans to farm. Chi wara masks were worn in male/female pairs during dance performances in the fields that taught and encouraged good farming. Today, because of conversion to Islam and a variety of social changes due to westernization, the Chi Wara masquerade is now performed for entertainment and cultural pride. The small pieces of red cloth attached to the snout of this male Chi Wara may have originated in the woolen bandages imported by the French during the First World War. In Bamana culture, red is the color of danger and is often restricted to men of certain status. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Malian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.107_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.107_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.107_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.107_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28367", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.107_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.107_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.107_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.107_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28368", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.107_A6.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.107_A6.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.107_A6.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.107_A6.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28370", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "At the left, with 93.14 on the right. On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 851, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/851", "Disp_Access_No" : "1993.14", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Crest Mask: Female Antelope (Chi Wara)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Bamana", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Bamana", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 1/2 x 7 5/8 x 8 in. (77.5 x 19.4 x 20.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, cane, shell, yarn and brass", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In many cultures, gods and spirits take the form of animals. Selected for their physical or behavioral traits, features of different animals are combined to create mythical creatures whose symbolic powers are greater than those of ordinary beasts. This antelope crest mask combines the curved horns of an antelope, the curious snout and scales of a pangolin (a kind of anteater) and the squat body of an aardvark—all animals that dig up the earth. This makes them fitting representations of Chi Wara, the supernatural being the Bamana believe taught humans to farm. The masks were worn in male/female pairs during dance performances in the fields that taught and encouraged good farming. Today, because of conversion to Islam and a variety of social changes due to westernization, the Chi Wara masquerade is now performed for entertainment and cultural pride. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Isabel C. Herdle", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Malian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.14_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.14_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.14_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.14_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28376", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.14_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.14_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.14_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.14_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28377", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.14_A5.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.14_A5.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.14_A5.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.14_A5.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28379", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On the right, with 69.107 on the left. On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4909, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4909", "Disp_Access_No" : "1969.71", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Door Lock", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Bamana", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Bamana", "Disp_Dimen" : "26 x 16 5/8 x 3 1/4 in. (66 x 42.2 x 8.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "26 in.", "Disp_Width" : "16 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood and metal", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This is a door lock of the Bamana people. Inside the lock, metal pins attach the horizontal and vertical elements. A metal key must be inserted into the hole between the creature’s shoulders to release the pins in the lock. But in truth, the functional value of a Bamana door lock is secondary to its spiritual value. An individual determined to break into a house with a sculpted door lock would find it an easy matter. Bamana door locks are primarily meant to protect a home against malevolent spirit forces seeking entry. This lock is in the form of a crocodile or water iguana. In Bamana mythology, these lizards are representatives of Faro, a powerful and beneficent deity who protects against sorcery. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Malian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.71_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.71_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.71_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.71_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26791", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4915, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4915", "Disp_Access_No" : "1969.33", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Female Figure (Blolo Bla or Asie Usu)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Baule", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Baule", "Disp_Dimen" : "17 1/8 x 3 1/8 x 3 in. (43.5 x 7.9 x 7.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "17 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Baule believe each person has a spirit spouse (husband=blolo bian, wife=blolo bla). The presence of a troublesome, jealous spirit spouse can result in illness or misfortune. A carving can be commissioned to ensure the spirit’s protection and good will. These extremely private sculptures are kept hidden in the owner’s bedroom where they are attended to and anointed with oil. Raised scarification patterns represent Baule standards of beauty and identity, while their contained posture and introspective expression reflect social virtues of tradition and decorum. Bush spirit figures (asye usu) are carved when an uncivilized bush spirit forms an attachment to a human and makes trouble in their life. Asye usu can only be appeased by a sculpted figure kept enshrined and placated with offerings that, over time accumulate in a thick crust. This surface (often cleaned off when the sculpture is sold) is the only way to distinguish between a spirit spouse and a bush spirit, as in all other ways they look the same. For this reason, it is impossible to know if this figure is a spirit spouse or a bush spirit figure. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.33_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.33_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.33_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.33_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31031", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4916, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4916", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.19", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Male Figure (Blolo Bian or Asie Usu)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Baule", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Baule", "Disp_Dimen" : "18 x 4 x 4 1/4 in. (45.7 x 10.2 x 10.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "18 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Baule believe each person has a spirit spouse (husband=blolo bian, wife=blolo bla). The presence of a troublesome, jealous spirit spouse can result in illness or misfortune. A carving can be commissioned to ensure the spirit’s protection and good will. These extremely private sculptures are kept hidden in the owner’s bedroom where they are attended to and anointed with oil. Raised scarification patterns represent Baule standards of beauty and identity, while their contained posture and introspective expression reflect social virtues of tradition and decorum. Bush spirit figures (asye usu) are carved when an uncivilized bush spirit forms an attachment to a human and makes trouble in their life. Asye usu can only be appeased by a sculpted figure kept enshrined and placated with offerings that, over time accumulate in a thick crust. This surface (often cleaned off when the sculpture is sold) is the only way to distinguish between a spirit spouse and a bush spirit, as in all other ways they look the same. For this reason, it is impossible to know if this figure is a spirit spouse or a bush spirit figure. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.19_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.19_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.19_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.19_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25518", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.19_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.19_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.19_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.19_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25519", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.19_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.19_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.19_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.19_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25520", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4912, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4912", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.20", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Crest Mask", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Cameroon", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Cameroon", "Disp_Dimen" : "15 9/16 x 14 3/4 x 14 7/8 in. (39.5 x 37.5 x 37.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "15 9/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "14 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This royal mask would have been performed at night; the animals around its crown are bats, nocturnal animals. The angular forms on the openwork cap reference the Cameroon brown spider which is associated with the high status of kings and the power of divination. This large spider is a member of the tarantula family and lives in the ground near the base of trees. In Cameroon the sacred earth spider has supernatural wisdom and serves as intermediary between the living and the buried dead. It is through these spiders that Cameroon diviners communicate with their ancestors. Crest Masks are different than face masks in that they are worn atop the head, rather than in front of the face. The dancer wearing this mask would have had his face concealed under a mask of see-through fabric. The rest of his body would have been covered in a costume of cloth. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Cameroonian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.20_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.20_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.20_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.20_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31039", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7381, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7381", "Disp_Access_No" : "1969.69", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Face Mask (Gegon)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Dan", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Dan", "Disp_Dimen" : "26 1/8 x 6 x 7 3/4 in. (66.4 x 15.2 x 19.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "26 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "6 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, raffia fiber", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Gegon is the bird masquerade; the dancer wears a tall cylindrical hat covered with feathers and mimes the pecking or flying movements of birds. In Dan mythology the toucan bird was the first being created and the bringer of oil palm, an important food source for the Dan. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.69_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.69_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.69_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.69_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28366", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7383, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7383", "Disp_Access_No" : "1970.24", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Face Mask (Bu Gle)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Dan", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Dan", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 x 6 1/2 x 4 1/4 in. (25.4 x 16.5 x 10.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 in.", "Disp_Width" : "6 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, metal, pigment, sacrificial materials", "Info_Page_Comm" : "To the Dan, a carved mask holds no power until it has been activated. A nail in the top of the forehead is sometimes a sign of spiritual activation, animating a previously inanimate object. The nail in this mask might also have functioned simply to secure pieces of the dance costume to the mask. The most important art to the Dan are the masks that embody powerful spiritual forces called gle. These wild, unpredictable bush spirits yearn to participate in the ordered realm of the village. Bu gle are war masks. Their bulging eyes and sharp angular features speak of an aggressive nature that is reflected in a rough and vigorous dancing style. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.24_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.24_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.24_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.24_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "26793", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.24_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.24_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.24_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.24_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28372", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7380, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7380", "Disp_Access_No" : "1969.21", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Face Mask with Hinged Jaw (Bu gle)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Dan", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Dan", "Disp_Dimen" : "12 x 5 3/4 x 4 1/2 in. (30.5 x 14.6 x 11.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "12 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, metal, monkey fur, sacrificial materials", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This mask originally had a hinged jaw that has broken off and is now covered with a patch of monkey fur. Masks like this are believed to embody spiritual beings capable of settling disputes with clear impartiality. By clattering the upper and lower jaw together the mask voices his judgments. The metal eye rims obscure the human eyes beneath and enhance an already penetrating glare. The thick crust visible on the surface is the result of sacrificial materials that have been “fed” to the bu gle – an appropriate way to control the powers of the mask. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.21_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.21_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.21_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.21_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26789", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7425, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7425", "Disp_Access_No" : "1970.21", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Face Mask", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Dyimini", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Dyimini", "Disp_Dimen" : "13 3/8 x 4 7/8 in. (34 x 12.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "13 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Dyimini masquerade functions within Poro, the men’s secret association that provides the traditional educational, religious, and social training for young men. Masks used in Poro are restricted to men; for the most part, women are forbidden to see and use these carvings and to learn the secrets of this powerful society. The mask’s linear scarification patterns and elaborate hairstyle are expressions of traditional Dyimini ideals of beauty. The raised serrated edge that frames the face depicts a stylized beard, a symbol of wisdom and authority achieved with age and experience. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.21_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.21_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.21_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.21_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28371", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 6352, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/6352", "Disp_Access_No" : "1983.17", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1895", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1905", "Disp_Title" : "Man and Woman in Canoe with Totemic Animals", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Haida", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Haida", "Disp_Dimen" : "4 x 2 1/4 x 13 7/8 in. (10.2 x 5.7 x 35.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Stone", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Argillite", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Argillite, a fine-grained sedimentary rock sometimes called “black slate,” is mined in the Queen Charlotte Islands, the only mineable source in North America. These small and easily transportable sculptures were first made by the Haida in the early 19th century for trade with outsiders. Here the canoe is filled with a raven, a bear and two human paddlers. The animals are totemic figures, relating to matrilineal clans; the human figure with longer hair may be a shaman. These sculptures are still being made today in an array of figure groupings and materials. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Nathaniel T. Whitcomb", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.17_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.17_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.17_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.17_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25830", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.17_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.17_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.17_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.17_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25831", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7839, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7839", "Disp_Access_No" : "1977.158", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Mask (Mai)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Iatmul", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Iatmul", "Disp_Dimen" : "29 x 6 1/2 x 5 1/2 in. (73.7 x 16.5 x 14 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "29 in.", "Disp_Width" : "6 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, shells, hair, paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This mask was made in the mid-20th century by an Iatmul artist after the traditional mai masks danced by young initiated men and boys. Mai masks were not worn directly over a dancer’s face, rather they were attached to a large basketry piece that fit over his head and upper body. To this piece were attached brightly colored flowers, feather and leaves that disguised the human form below. Hidden below the costume the dancer sang in falsetto through a bamboo tube which helped to further transform his voice and presence. Four masks were danced together in two pairs, one as a pair of brothers and one as a pair of sisters. While the performances were public affairs, much of the preparation before and activities during were veiled in secrecy. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/77.158_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/77.158_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/77.158_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/77.158_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31034", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7829, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7829", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.139", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Gable Mask", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Iatmul", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Iatmul", "Disp_Dimen" : "14 3/4 x 7 11/16 x 4 1/2 in. (37.5 x 19.5 x 11.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "14 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 11/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment, shell", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The spiritual lives of Melanesian communities are dominated by Men’s Societies. The ceremonial Men’s House is the sacred dwelling place of the clan spirits, treasures, and of initiated men. Gable masks like this adorned the façades of Men’s Houses. Similar to gargoyles in medieval churches, these figures were meant to ward off troublesome spirits that can cause illness and spread mischief. Gable masks embodied powerful female, ancestral spirits. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.139_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.139_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.139_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.139_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "26798", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.139_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.139_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.139_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.139_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28374", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4908, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4908", "Disp_Access_No" : "1985.25", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Reliquary Image (Ngulu/Nguru)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Kota", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Kota", "Disp_Dimen" : "15 1/4 x 11 1/4 in. (38.7 x 28.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "15 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "11 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Brass", "Support" : "wood", "Disp_Medium" : "Brass and copper over wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In the past, the Kota venerated the bones of their most revered ancestors. The bones were believed to embody their spirits which, if treated well, could aid and improve the lives of the living. Kept in enclosed baskets, these precious, sacred bones were guarded by reliquary figures like this one. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Gertrude Herdle Moore and Isabel Herdle in honor of Langdon Clay", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Gabonese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/85.25_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/85.25_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/85.25_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/85.25_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26810", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4911, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4911", "Disp_Access_No" : "1993.37", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Face Mask", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Marka", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Marka", "Disp_Dimen" : "12 3/16 x 5 11/16 x 4 3/4 in. (31 x 14.5 x 12 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "12 3/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 11/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, brass, iron and fiber", "Info_Page_Comm" : "As human sweat leaves a recognizable patina or surface appearance on wood, evidence of use is visible on the back of this mask. It was likely performed by males in Marka men’s association (jow). These masquerades are performed to help coordinate community labor projects, provide entertainment to the public and teach young men how to take on their adult responsibilities. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Nancy Watson Dean", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Malian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.37_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.37_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.37_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.37_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28380", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7403, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7403", "Disp_Access_No" : "1972.52", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Helmet Mask (Sowei)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Mende", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Mende", "Disp_Dimen" : "15 1/2 x 8 7/8 x 8 7/8 in. (39.4 x 22.5 x 22.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "15 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "8 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The only occasion upon which it is acceptable for women to wear masks in Africa is during the ceremonies of the Sande society in Mende culture. Sande society, which includes all Mende women, wields a great deal of political and social power. Sowei is the Sande society’s guardian spirit and as such has a forceful, aggressive dance style that is enhanced by an imposing body covering of black raffia fibers. The carved mask embodies ideal Mende womanhood: a high clear forehead (intelligence); downcast eyes (servility); small mouth (discretion); neck rings (health) and scarification (physical beauty). The elaborate hairstyle reflects the importance of social bonds between women as it takes many hands to create such a look. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Sierra Leonean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/72.52_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/72.52_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/72.52_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/72.52_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "30516", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/72.52_A5.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/72.52_A5.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/72.52_A5.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/72.52_A5.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "30517", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7486, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7486", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.45", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Face Mask", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Nuxálk", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Nuxálk", "Disp_Dimen" : "29 1/2 x 18 x 11 in. (74.9 x 45.7 x 27.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "29 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "18 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Nuxalkmc (Nuxálk people) were once referred to as the "Bella Coola." Their homeland and territory are located in and around the Bella Coola valley on the central coast of what is now known as British Columbia, Canada. A rugged inland area located 75 miles from the Pacific Ocean, the region features high mountains rising steeply from the shores of inlets. Nuxálk traditional stories are filled with fabulous beings, many human in form and represented by masked performers in ceremonial dance dramas. Both natural and commercial pigments were used in the decoration of masks, and the characteristic blue, vermilion and black painting is dramatic and distinctive. Very little is known about this mask that is too large to have been worn. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Isabel C. Herdle", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Per Art Committee minutes of Oct 1984, purchased by Ms. Herdle at a Rochester art fair, from a man whose grandfather had acquired it while building the Canadian-Pacific railroad.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.45_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.45_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.45_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.45_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26809", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7404, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7404", "Disp_Access_No" : "1972.53", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Face Mask with Hinged Jaw (Elu)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Ogoni", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Ogoni", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 1/2 x 4 3/4 x 4 5/8 in. (19.1 x 12.1 x 11.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment and fiber", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The white face of this Ogoni mask is associated with the youthfulness of benevolent spirits. As positive forces, elu are entertainers and are performed by young men on multiple occasions throughout the year. These unusually small masks perch on the front of the dancer’s face attached to a woven head piece. The mask is further animated when the dancer, clenching in his teeth a stick attached to its back, opens and closes the hinged jaw. The bowler hat is typical of this type of mask, as elu often depict hairstyles and fashions current at the time. In the early 20th century when this mask was carved, the Ogoni were involved in trading palm oil (for cooking) and gained exposure to this European style. These bowler hats became desirable prestige items for the Ogoni. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Nigerian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/72.53_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/72.53_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/72.53_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/72.53_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25522", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/72.53_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/72.53_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/72.53_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/72.53_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25521", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7854, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7854", "Disp_Access_No" : "1987.82", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Spirit Board (Gope)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Disp_Dimen" : "47 1/2 x 7 5/8 in. (120.7 x 19.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "47 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Traditionally, spirit or gope boards were considered dwelling places for individual spirits. Each spirit was linked to specific parts of the land, river or sea associated with the clan. They were kept in each clan’s cubicle within the larger Men’s House along with other items such as human and animal skulls meant to honor various spirits within their clan. The boards' highly stylized imagery is believed to represent the way the spirit looks. While the imagery reflects certain consistencies within clans, their varied style and appearance reflects individual artists’ representations of individual spirits. Despite differences, every board has a face and a navel. The navel was particularly important because it served as the access point through which the spirit entered the board. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of James and Denise Wasserstrom", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/87.82_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/87.82_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/87.82_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/87.82_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29877", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "These images are smaller than the usual in-house registration photographs because they were taken with Jessica Marten''s personal Canon camera which does not have a raw file format. But because they were taken with accession numbers and color bars, it was determined it was best to create master, print, access files, rather than just access files. These are not appropriate for publication, but are perfectly good for web display.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7849, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7849", "Disp_Access_No" : "1987.79", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Spirit Board (Gope)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Disp_Dimen" : "44 3/8 x 9 1/2 in. (112.7 x 24.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "44 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Traditionally, spirit or gope boards were considered dwelling places for individual spirits. Each spirit was linked to specific parts of the land, river or sea associated with the clan. They were kept in each clan’s cubicle within the larger Men’s House along with other items such as human and animal skulls meant to honor various spirits within their clan. The boards' highly stylized imagery is believed to represent the way the spirit looks. While the imagery reflects certain consistencies within clans, their varied style and appearance reflects individual artists’ representations of individual spirits. Despite differences, every board has a face and a navel. The navel was particularly important because it served as the access point through which the spirit entered the board. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of James and Denise Wasserstrom", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/87.79_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/87.79_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/87.79_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/87.79_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29863", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "These images are smaller than the usual in-house registration photographs because they were taken with Jessica Marten''s personal Canon camera which does not have a raw file format. But because they were taken with accession numbers and color bars, it was determined it was best to create master, print, access files, rather than just access files. These are not appropriate for publication, but are perfectly good for web display.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7857, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7857", "Disp_Access_No" : "1987.84", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Spirit Board (Gope)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Disp_Dimen" : "54 x 12 3/4 in. (137.2 x 32.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "54 in.", "Disp_Width" : "12 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Traditionally, spirit or gope boards were considered dwelling places for individual spirits. Each spirit was linked to specific parts of the land, river or sea associated with the clan. They were kept in each clan’s cubicle within the larger Men’s House along with other items such as human and animal skulls meant to honor various spirits within their clan. The boards' highly stylized imagery is believed to represent the way the spirit looks. While the imagery reflects certain consistencies within clans, their varied style and appearance reflects individual artists’ representations of individual spirits. Despite differences, every board has a face and a navel. The navel was particularly important because it served as the access point through which the spirit entered the board. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of James and Denise Wasserstrom", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/87.84_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/87.84_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/87.84_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/87.84_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29879", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "These images are smaller than the usual in-house registration photographs because they were taken with Jessica Marten''s personal Canon camera which does not have a raw file format. But because they were taken with accession numbers and color bars, it was determined it was best to create master, print, access files, rather than just access files. These are not appropriate for publication, but are perfectly good for web display.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7407, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7407", "Disp_Access_No" : "1969.72", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Rhythm Pounder (Deble)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Senufo", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Senufo", "Disp_Dimen" : "42 1/2 in. (108 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "42 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In many African societies, life on earth is seen as part of a continuum that permits movement between the spirit and earthly worlds. As ancestors are in a position to assist the living, they must be respected and attended to. The rhythm pounders of the Senufo originally functioned as communication devices in calling the spirits of ancestors to participate in funerals. Held by the upper arms, the rhythm pounder’s thick base is thumped into the earth in rhythm with the sounds of chants, drums and rattles. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.72_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.72_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.72_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.72_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28660", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.72_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.72_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.72_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.72_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28661", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7411, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7411", "Disp_Access_No" : "1970.22", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Helmet Mask (Waniougo)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Senufo", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Senufo", "Disp_Dimen" : "14 3/8 x 25 3/4 x 13 in. (36.5 x 65.4 x 33 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "14 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "25 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The sharp edges and angular forms of this double-faced mask (waniougo) result in a fierce and expressive presence. A fearsome appearance is desirable as waniougo’s role is to frighten away evil spirits wishing to harm a Senufo village at times of particular vulnerability, for example at funerals. Their appearance in nighttime masquerades enhances the otherworldly presence of these “firespitter” masks; embers or burning grass are held in front of the mouths through which the wearer blows to creating a dramatic shower of sparks into the night sky. Waniougo combines the features of crocodiles (teeth), hippos (tusks), warthogs (upper tusks) and chameleons (two are visible on the top). In order to empower the mask before the ceremony, the cup held by the chameleons is filled with magical materials and the mask freshly painted with spots. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.22_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.22_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.22_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.22_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "15068", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2818, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2818", "Disp_Access_No" : "1922.5", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Shaman Medicine Charm", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Tlingit", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Tlingit", "Disp_Dimen" : "6 1/4 x 2 1/4 in. (15.9 x 5.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "6 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Walrus ivory", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Walrus ivory", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The belief that humans can draw power from the non-human world is a framework that underlies many belief systems, and is especially strong in most Native North American culture groups. Shamans played an especially important role in this respect. Responsible for curing the sick, controlling the weather, guaranteeing successful fish runs, combating witches, and providing assistance during battle, shamans moved freely between the human and spirit world. Tlingit shamans often carried charms like this one. Each charm is unique and often includes a multiplicity of figures. This charm is in the form of a whale, with the rear assuming the form of a land otter, a highly powerful spirit helper to the shaman. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Henry A. Strong", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.5_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.5_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.5_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.5_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "15069", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.5_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.5_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.5_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.5_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25805", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7836, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7836", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.76", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Spirit Figure (Mindja)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Waresi", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Waresi", "Disp_Dimen" : "41 3/4 x 9 13/16 x 4 5/16 in. (106 x 25 x 11 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "41 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 13/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The cultivation of yams was central to the lives of the Waresi people; they served as both a ceremonial and staple food. The spirits responsible for their growth (and by extension for the welfare of the community) needed to be properly honored upon the harvest. During the mindja-ma ceremony a basket containing yams was adorned with two of these figures. Mindja were considered to be powerful male water spirits who lived, and were sometimes visible, just below the surface in lakes. This powerful otherworldly being embodies the qualities of humans, plants and animals. The simplified eyes, nose and mouth are based on the human face. The painted diamond shapes symbolize banana leaves, and the projecting triangles that run down the bottom half of the figure represent an undulating snake. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.76_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.76_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.76_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.76_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26801", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7418, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7418", "Disp_Access_No" : "1972.54", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Crest Mask", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Yaka", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Yaka", "Disp_Dimen" : "20 1/4 x 18 1/4 x 15 in. (51.4 x 46.4 x 38.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "20 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "18 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, fiber, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Masks like this one are danced by young Yaka men in celebration of completing a stage of their initiation into manhood. These masks provide protection to the young, vulnerable men as they enter into the challenges and responsibilities of adulthood. In particular, they are meant to insure the young men’s virility for the future of the community. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Democratic Republic of the Congo", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/72.54_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/72.54_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/72.54_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/72.54_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "26797", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/72.54_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/72.54_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/72.54_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/72.54_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31037", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4914, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4914", "Disp_Access_No" : "1964.102", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Spoon", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Yaoure or Baule", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Yaoure or Baule", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 1/16 x 1 3/4 x 3 3/8 in. (18 x 4.5 x 8.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 1/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "1 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Gertrude H. Moore", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "This was determined to be the same object as that catalogued as 61.16. As the information is filed and the object currently exhibited under the later number, it was decided to make the earlier record inactive and maintain this 64.102 record.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/64.102_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/64.102_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/64.102_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/64.102_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25504", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/64.102_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/64.102_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/64.102_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/64.102_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25505", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7422, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7422", "Disp_Access_No" : "1965.9.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Twin Figure (Ere Ibeji)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Yoruba", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Yoruba", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 3/8 x 2 5/8 x 2 3/4 in. (23.8 x 6.7 x 7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment, beads, cowrie shells, fiber, sacrificial materials", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Yoruba have one of the highest rates of twinning in the world. Twins are endowed with powerful attributes, both auspicious and dangerous. Due to the high mortality rate of twins, when one or both dies, Yoruba mothers procure small wooden statues (ere ibeji) to house the spirits of the deceased. If there is a single ibeji, it is likely that one twin died and one survived. If there are two ibeji figures, then it is likely that both twins died. Wealthy women clothe their ere ibeji in beaded or shelled vests. Surface accumulation and signs of wear are common as ibeji figures are cared for in the same manner as a living child and are handled, clothed, washed, fed and honored with dances and songs. Lyrics from a Yoruba song explain how the care of ere ibeji can control the potentially negative influence of twins’ spirits, “Abuse me and I shall follow you home. Praise me and I shall leave you alone.” Subsequent generations inherit the care of ere ibeji from their ancestors. 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(23.5 x 6.7 x 6.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment, beads, cowrie shells, fiber, sacrificial materials", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Yoruba have one of the highest rates of twinning in the world. Twins are endowed with powerful attributes, both auspicious and dangerous. Due to the high mortality rate of twins, when one or both dies, Yoruba mothers procure small wooden statues (ere ibeji) to house the spirits of the deceased. If there is a single ibeji, it is likely that one twin died and one survived. If there are two ibeji figures, then it is likely that both twins died. Wealthy women clothe their ere ibeji in beaded or shelled vests. Surface accumulation and signs of wear are common as ibeji figures are cared for in the same manner as a living child and are handled, clothed, washed, fed and honored with dances and songs. Lyrics from a Yoruba song explain how the care of ere ibeji can control the potentially negative influence of twins’ spirits, “Abuse me and I shall follow you home. Praise me and I shall leave you alone.” Subsequent generations inherit the care of ere ibeji from their ancestors. 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