{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 3751, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3751", "Disp_Access_No" : "1939.8", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1939", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1934", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1944", "Disp_Title" : "Fungus", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Harwood Steiger", "Sort_Artist" : "Steiger, Harwood", "Disp_Dimen" : "18 1/2 x 24 in. (47 x 61 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "18 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Watercolor", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Harwood Steiger, a master of the watercolor medium, lived for many years in Fairport, NY. Steiger’s industrial landscape is a ramshackle vision. The title, <em>Fungus</em>, implies Steiger’s impression of industry as a growing blight on the landscape. However, the almost-comical characterizations suggest a more harmless than threatening presence. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Acquired by exchange through the generosity of Fannie Benjamin", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/39.8_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/39.8_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/39.8_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/39.8_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37615", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3568, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3568", "Disp_Access_No" : "1947.105", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1935", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1935", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1935", "Disp_Title" : "Telegraph Pole", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Charles Ephraim Burchfield", "Sort_Artist" : "Burchfield, Charles Ephraim", "Disp_Dimen" : "23 3/8 x 20 7/8 in. (59.4 x 53 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "23 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Watercolor", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor, charcoal and graphite", "Info_Page_Comm" : "As a symbol of American invention and progress, the telegraph pole and its wires frame a depressing landscape. The curved pole, clearly a tree cut down and stripped of its bark and limbs, is a powerful metaphor for the abuse that man and nature experience under the unstoppable momentum of industry. Railroad tracks lined by austere workers’ huts lead the viewer’s eyes back to an industrial inferno. Buffalo artist Charles Burchfield felt a great deal of reverence for the natural world. His nuanced depictions of the industrial landscape were indictments of environmental abuse. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Charles H. Babcock", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/47.105_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/47.105_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/47.105_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/47.105_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "33650", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "converted from Seeing America CMYK image for web use", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/47.105_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/47.105_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/47.105_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/47.105_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "39114", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3763, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3763", "Disp_Access_No" : "1968.43", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Asphalt Plant, Painted Post, N.Y.", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John C. Wenrich", "Sort_Artist" : "Wenrich, John C.", "Disp_Dimen" : "20 3/16 x 27 15/16 in. (51.2 x 71 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "20 3/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "27 15/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Watercolor", "Support" : "board", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor", "Info_Page_Comm" : "John C. Wenrich managed to turn a painting of an asphalt plant into a compelling rumination on the dynamic between nature and machine. In a style that celebrates the precision and geometry of machines, the artist dwarfs the industrial complex with a massive hill as if to put the proper perspective on the relationship between technology and nature. This asphalt plant in Painted Post, just north of Corning, NY, combined sand and stone with a binder under extremely high temperatures to produce blacktop, the material used to pave more than 95% of American roads. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/68.43_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/68.43_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/68.43_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/68.43_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37618", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3438, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3438", "Disp_Access_No" : "1970.12", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1937", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1937", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1937", "Disp_Title" : "Fan, New York, 1937", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "André Kertész", "Sort_Artist" : "Kertész, André", "Disp_Dimen" : "13 15/16 x 11 in. (35.4 x 27.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "13 15/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "11 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Gelatin silver print", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Gelatin silver print", "Info_Page_Comm" : "André Kertész’s photo of an arm threaded through a fan hints at the vulnerability of the human body to the awesome power of the machine. During what is now called the “machine age” (1918-1941), American culture was preoccupied with innovations in technology and industrialization. While machines offered the average individual unprecedented lifestyle improvements, a threat hovered beneath the promise—the machine needed to be controlled. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Genesee Valley School Development Assocation", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Photograph", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.12_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.12_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.12_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.12_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37619", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1533, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1533", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.65", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1965", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1965", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1965", "Disp_Title" : "Landscape III", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Allan D'Arcangelo", "Sort_Artist" : "D'Arcangelo, Allan", "Disp_Dimen" : "39 7/8 x 29 13/16 in. (101.3 x 75.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "39 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "29 13/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "wove paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color Serigraph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Allan D’Arcangelo’s <em>Landscape III</em> is a consideration of the new American landscape of highways, suspended bridges, traffic signs, and billboards. A minor border of sky and grass surround a traffic sign that normally indicates a hairpin curve. Turned on its side and placed over another arrow sign pointing in the opposite direction, the sign’s meaning becomes unclear and potentially dangerous. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.65_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.65_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.65_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.65_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37656", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3743, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3743", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.94", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1935", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1935", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1935", "Disp_Title" : "Totems in Steel", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Charles Sheeler", "Sort_Artist" : "Sheeler, Charles", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 11/16 x 5 1/8 in. (9.4 x 13 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 11/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "image", "Medium" : "Gouache", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Gouache ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This image of a New York City construction site is based on a film still from Charles Sheeler’s 1920 film collaboration with photographer Paul Strand, <em>Manhatta</em>. In the ten-minute film, the artists track the dynamism of Manhattan through the course of a day, focusing on the unique pulse and geometry of the city’s machinery, vehicles, and architecture. <em>Manhatta</em> provided Sheeler with numerous images from which he later painted. The title of this painting, <em>Totems in Steel</em>, frames modern engineering, industry, and architecture in quasi-religious terms. Sheeler wrote, “In a period such as ours when only a comparatively few individuals seem to be given to religion, some form other than the Gothic cathedral must be found. Industry concerns the greatest numbers—it may be true, as has been said, that our factories are our substitute for religious expression.” [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Peter Iselin and his sister, Emilie Iselin Wiggin", "Copyright_Type" : "No existing copyright holder", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.94_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.94_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.94_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.94_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "27604", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk dated 1-16-05", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3282, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3282", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.96", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1931", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1931", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1931", "Disp_Title" : "Ballet Mechanique", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Charles Sheeler", "Sort_Artist" : "Sheeler, Charles", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 1/2 x 10 1/4 in. (26.7 x 26 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "10 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "image", "Medium" : "Conte crayon", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Conte crayon ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1927, Charles Sheeler was commissioned to photograph Henry Ford’s River Rouge car factory outside Detroit to advertise the company’s new Model A car. Ford’s innovations in the assembly line were celebrated for their efficiency, productivity, and ability to produce low-cost consumer goods. Yet the dark underside to this progress was unbearable, dehumanizing work conditions. <em>Ballet Mechanique</em>, based on a photo from Sheeler’s Ford factory series, is a tightly-cropped scene of an industrial system of pipes and metal. By isolating the sleek machinery from actual labor, Sheeler elevates the loud, hot, dangerous factory environment to a cool, sleek, abstract vision of modernity. Sheeler’s style, Precisionism, was a celebration of the technological sublime with its crisp, pure form and industrial themes. Of American artists in the early years of the 1900s, Charles Sheeler made one of the most dramatic breaks from the traditional assumption that beauty could be found in nature alone. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Peter Iselin and his sister, Emilie Iselin Wiggin", "Copyright_Type" : "No existing copyright holder", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.96_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.96_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.96_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.96_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12464", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print master derived 11/23/09 by Lu Harper for Seeing America lesson plans.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1222, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1222", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.164", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1967", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1967", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1967", "Disp_Title" : "Ten Pound Hammer", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Thomas Hart Benton", "Sort_Artist" : "Benton, Thomas Hart", "Disp_Dimen" : "13 3/4 x 9 5/8 in. (34.9 x 24.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "13 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In <em>Ten Pound Hammer</em>, Thomas Hart Benton explored the machine’s relationship to man and labor in an “old story of my youth – before the steam hammer beat out John Henry.” According to the American folk legend, John Henry was a heroic African-American man and the greatest steel driver in the late-1900s westward expansion of the railroad. In the story, when the railroad owner brought in a steam-powered hammer, John Henry offered to compete against the machine to save his and his men’s jobs. Although he won the race, John Henry died in victory. The legend of John Henry, which may be based in historical events, grew in popular stories and songs as an allegory of the threat of modernization and the umanning of American labor. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.164_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.164_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.164_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.164_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37657", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2049, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2049", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.245", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1921", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1921", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1921", "Disp_Title" : "Downtown, New York", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Marin", "Sort_Artist" : "Marin, John", "Disp_Dimen" : "6 3/4 x 8 3/4 in. (17.1 x 22.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "6 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "8 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In John Marin’s <em>Downtown, New York</em>, the viewer experiences the dizzying, disorienting sensation of looking up at the buildings while walking on a city street. Marin’s urban vision was one of energy, force, and fragmentation. He sought to capture the frenetic pace of the modern urban experience and the power of skyscrapers as though they themselves were active players in the city’s vitality, as “warring, pushing, pulling forces.” The slashing diagonal form is the elevated railroad that dominated the New York City landscape starting in the 1870s. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.245_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.245_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.245_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.245_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37623", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1615, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1615", "Disp_Access_No" : "1986.12", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1935-1939", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1935", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1939", "Disp_Title" : "Locomotive Standing", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Harold Faye", "Sort_Artist" : "Faye, Harold", "Disp_Dimen" : "12 1/2 x 16 in. (31.8 x 40.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "12 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Helen S. Faye", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/86.12_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/86.12_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/86.12_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/86.12_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37658", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3118, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3118", "Disp_Access_No" : "1986.13", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1935-1939", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1935", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1939", "Disp_Title" : "Sketch for "Locomotive Standing"", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Harold Faye", "Sort_Artist" : "Faye, Harold", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 7/8 x 15 3/8 in. (30.2 x 39.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "15 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Lithographic crayon", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithographic crayon and graphite ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Helen S. Faye", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/86.13_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/86.13_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/86.13_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/86.13_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37634", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 12024, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/12024", "Disp_Access_No" : "2004.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1926-1927", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1926", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1927", "Disp_Title" : "Aeroplane, Image Thrown on a Screen", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Louis Lozowick", "Sort_Artist" : "Lozowick, Louis", "Disp_Dimen" : "13 x 18 3/8 in. (33 x 46.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "13 in.", "Disp_Width" : "18 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Graphite and black ink with white paint ", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Graphite and black ink with white paint on heavy cream wove paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Lozowick’s style, Precisionism, was practiced by many American artists between the wars. Although it was not a unified artistic movement, Precisionist artists did share an interest in technological themes and a style that celebrated the precise lines and formal beauty of machines. As a proponent of the industrial aesthetic, Louis Lozowick was involved in organizing the widely-influential 1927 <em>Machine-Age Exposition</em> in New York City. This groundbreaking exhibition included machines and machine parts alongside paintings, sculptures, and drawings by avant-garde artists. This drawing was likely related to Lozowick’s set design for a 1926 production of George Kaiser’s play <em>Gas</em>, about the dehumanization and need for spiritual regeneration caused by industrialization. Lozowick constructed wooden structures of his machine ornaments and projected the images onto screens to create a mechanically-themed set design. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Anonymous gift", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2004.1_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2004.1_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2004.1_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2004.1_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37635", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3224, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3224", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.265", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1966", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1966", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1966", "Disp_Title" : "Landscape 31", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "George Olson", "Sort_Artist" : "Olson, George", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 3/4 x 17 1/4 in. (29.8 x 43.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "17 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Charcoal", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Charcoal and wash ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "One of the most frightening notions tied to modern technology is that its evolution exists outside the control of man. In <em>Landscape 31</em>, artist George Olson creates a landscape in which discarded mass-produced goods obliterate any view of the sky, grass, or trees. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.265_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.265_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.265_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.265_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37624", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3396, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3396", "Disp_Access_No" : "1978.127", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1955", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1955", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1955", "Disp_Title" : "Trolley -- New Orleans", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Robert Frank", "Sort_Artist" : "Frank, Robert", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 7/8 x 14 in. (27.7 x 35.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "14 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Gelatin silver print", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Gelatin silver print on paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This now-iconic image of anonymous people riding a trolley car in New Orleans was originally published in Robert Frank’s most notable work, the book <em>The Americans</em> (1958). Frank took the photo just a few weeks before Rosa Parks refused to give up her bus seat in Montgomery, Alabama, ultimately leading to the 1956 Supreme Court ruling that outlawed segregation on public transportation. The power that trolley cars and other forms of public transportation had to expand and transform the urban landscape was unfortunately equaled by its power to segregate and reinforce oppressive racial and social inequities. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Genesee Valley School Development Association", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Photograph", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/78.127_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/78.127_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/78.127_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/78.127_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37630", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2302, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2302", "Disp_Access_No" : "1980.33", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1977", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1977", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1977", "Disp_Title" : "Violent Turn", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "James Rosenquist", "Sort_Artist" : "Rosenquist, James", "Disp_Dimen" : "36 1/2 x 73 3/4 in. (92.7 x 187.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "36 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "73 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The violence inherent in a machine of steel and glass designed to reach speeds of over 75 miles per hour is the subject of James Rosenquist’s abstract print, <em>Violent Turn</em>. This billboard-sized image highlights the danger such a machine—irrational, destructive—holds for a human body of flesh and bone. This was a threat the artist experienced first-hand in 1971 when he, his wife, and his son were all badly injured in a tragic car accident. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ ] },{ "embark_ID" : 10399, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/10399", "Disp_Access_No" : "2001.17", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1935-1936", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1935", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1936", "Disp_Title" : "White Collar Boys", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Elizabeth M. Olds", "Sort_Artist" : "Olds, Elizabeth M.", "Disp_Dimen" : "13 x 17 3/8 in. (33 x 44.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "13 in.", "Disp_Width" : "17 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "wove paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In <em>White Collar Boys</em>, Elizabeth M. Olds depicts a group of Wall Street men marching down the street with no individuation or sense of independent will. The concept of the automaton—a human/machine amalgamation—was an outgrowth of life in an industrial, urban environment in which almost all facets of life had become automated and removed from nature. In 1922, philosopher and historian Lewis Mumford wrote, “We have had the alternative of humanizing the industrial city or de-humanizing the population. So far we have de-humanized the population.” [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2001.17_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2001.17_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2001.17_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2001.17_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "32733", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1764, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1764", "Disp_Access_No" : "1940.27", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1913", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1913", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1913", "Disp_Title" : "New York Sky Line, Dark Buildings", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Childe Hassam", "Sort_Artist" : "Hassam, Childe", "Disp_Dimen" : "13 3/4 x 7 3/4 in. (34.9 x 19.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "13 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Childe Hassam drew this 1913 profile of the New York City skyline the year construction on the Woolworth Building was completed. At 57 stories, it was the tallest building in the world until the Chrysler Building was completed in 1930. Perhaps it was excitement with the new engineering and construction technologies that led Hassam to exert artistic license in his depiction of the building’s silhouette, thereby dramatizing its height. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Maud Hassam", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/40.27_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/40.27_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/40.27_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/40.27_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37616", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1551, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1551", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.142", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1931", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1931", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1931", "Disp_Title" : "Two Figures and El", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Stuart Davis", "Sort_Artist" : "Davis, Stuart", "Disp_Dimen" : "19 11/16 x 25 7/8 in. (50 x 65.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "19 11/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "25 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : ""Some of the things that have made me want to paint... are: skyscraper architecture… fast travel by train, auto, and aeroplane which brought new and multiple perspectives…" -Stuart Davis, 1954 Stuart Davis was so inspired by the visual discontinuity and fragmentation of the urban environment that he developed a unique, modern visual lexicon to capture it. Without regard for perspective, scale, or the laws of gravity, Davis’s abstracted vision of two individuals waiting on the platform for an elevated train captures all the noise and energy of the scene. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Artists in the Kitchen Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.142_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.142_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.142_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.142_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37622", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1502, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1502", "Disp_Access_No" : "1983.9", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1952", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1952", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1952", "Disp_Title" : "Third Avenue Elevated #4", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Ralston Crawford", "Sort_Artist" : "Crawford, Ralston", "Disp_Dimen" : "19 13/16 x 12 7/8 in. (50.3 x 32.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "19 13/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "12 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Ralston Crawford believed that the “emancipation of the times” would be attained through industrialization. His earlier Precisionist style and his ongoing preoccupation with industry, the machine, and speed can be seen in his painting <a href=”http://magart.rochester.edu/Obj296”><em>Whitestone Bridge</em></a>, 1939-40, in the Memorial Art Galley collection (accession number 51.2). By the time he created this print, <em>Third Avenue El #4</em>, Crawford’s style had become significantly more abstract. Here he captures the ubiquitous vertical steel pylons that support elevated train tracks throughout New York City neighborhoods. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Isabel C. Herdle in memory of Hilda Altschule Coates", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.9_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.9_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.9_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.9_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37633", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2317, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2317", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.325.8", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1972", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1972", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1972", "Disp_Title" : "Desert Wreck", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Salt", "Sort_Artist" : "Salt, John", "Disp_Dimen" : "25 x 35 1/2 in. (63.5 x 90.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "25 in.", "Disp_Width" : "35 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "From the Documenta Portfolio While living and teaching art in America, British artist John Salt created a series of paintings and prints of wrecked cars in an impeccably realistic style. As a Photorealist artist, Salt projects his own photographs onto a surface, and from this projected image he creates his work of art. In technique and subject, Salt’s work represents the camera and the car, two modern machines that have become indispensable and so personally embedded in our lives that they function like extensions of our bodies. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "British", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.325.8_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.325.8_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.325.8_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.325.8_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37626", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 13567, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/13567", "Disp_Access_No" : "2005.225", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Almost Home for Christmas", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John C. Wenrich", "Sort_Artist" : "Wenrich, John C.", "Disp_Dimen" : "18 5/8 x 23 7/8 in. (47.3 x 60.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "18 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "23 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Watercolor", "Support" : "illustration board", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor, gouache and graphite ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "John C. Wenrich’s watercolor painting captures one of the ironies of modern technology: the occasional and spectacular failure of machines designed to make life more convenient. In <em>Almost Home for Christmas</em>, the family car has been bested by the snow. The application of good old-fashioned sweat and muscles of both man and beast is the only solution. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of James and Dorothy H. Green", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2005.225_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2005.225_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2005.225_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2005.225_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "22689", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1671, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1671", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.332.3", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1970", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1965", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1975", "Disp_Title" : "Paul's Corner", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Ralph Goings", "Sort_Artist" : "Goings, Ralph", "Disp_Dimen" : "18 1/8 x 25 3/4 in. (46 x 65.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "18 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "25 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Offset lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "An early 1950s Ford F100 truck provided Photorealist artist Ralph Goings with a handsome still-life element to anchor his composition in <em>Paul’s Corner</em>. The truck’s smooth line and muscular body, the essence of machine-crafted form, were 20 years old when this image was made. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.332.3_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.332.3_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.332.3_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.332.3_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37628", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3006, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3006", "Disp_Access_No" : "1977.153", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1926-1928", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1926", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1928", "Disp_Title" : "Threshing", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Thomas Hart Benton", "Sort_Artist" : "Benton, Thomas Hart", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 x 12 in. (22.9 x 30.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 in.", "Disp_Width" : "12 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Graphite", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Graphite, ink and watercolor ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Most artists interested in depicting machine subjects looked to the city for inspiration. Thomas Hart Benton’s Regionalist vision looked to the rural areas of middle America for subject matter. In this drawing, Benton illustrates how an engine-powered threshing machine was fundamentally changing agricultural labor. Thomas Hart Benton was less interested in the physicality of the actual machine and more interested in the ways in which machines impacted the lives and labors of man. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Solomon K. Gross", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/77.153_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/77.153_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/77.153_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/77.153_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37629", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }