{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 3282, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3282", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.96", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1931", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1931", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1931", "Disp_Title" : "Ballet Mechanique", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Charles Sheeler", "Sort_Artist" : "Sheeler, Charles", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 1/2 x 10 1/4 in. (26.7 x 26 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "10 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "image", "Medium" : "Conte crayon", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Conte crayon ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1927, Charles Sheeler was commissioned to photograph Henry Ford’s River Rouge car factory outside Detroit to advertise the company’s new Model A car. Ford’s innovations in the assembly line were celebrated for their efficiency, productivity, and ability to produce low-cost consumer goods. Yet the dark underside to this progress was unbearable, dehumanizing work conditions. <em>Ballet Mechanique</em>, based on a photo from Sheeler’s Ford factory series, is a tightly-cropped scene of an industrial system of pipes and metal. By isolating the sleek machinery from actual labor, Sheeler elevates the loud, hot, dangerous factory environment to a cool, sleek, abstract vision of modernity. Sheeler’s style, Precisionism, was a celebration of the technological sublime with its crisp, pure form and industrial themes. Of American artists in the early years of the 1900s, Charles Sheeler made one of the most dramatic breaks from the traditional assumption that beauty could be found in nature alone. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Peter Iselin and his sister, Emilie Iselin Wiggin", "Copyright_Type" : "No existing copyright holder", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.96_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.96_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.96_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.96_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12464", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print master derived 11/23/09 by Lu Harper for Seeing America lesson plans.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3118, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3118", "Disp_Access_No" : "1986.13", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1935-1939", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1935", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1939", "Disp_Title" : "Sketch for "Locomotive Standing"", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Harold Faye", "Sort_Artist" : "Faye, Harold", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 7/8 x 15 3/8 in. (30.2 x 39.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "15 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Lithographic crayon", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithographic crayon and graphite ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Helen S. Faye", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/86.13_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/86.13_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/86.13_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/86.13_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37634", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 12024, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/12024", "Disp_Access_No" : "2004.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1926-1927", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1926", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1927", "Disp_Title" : "Aeroplane, Image Thrown on a Screen", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Louis Lozowick", "Sort_Artist" : "Lozowick, Louis", "Disp_Dimen" : "13 x 18 3/8 in. (33 x 46.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "13 in.", "Disp_Width" : "18 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Graphite and black ink with white paint ", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Graphite and black ink with white paint on heavy cream wove paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Lozowick’s style, Precisionism, was practiced by many American artists between the wars. Although it was not a unified artistic movement, Precisionist artists did share an interest in technological themes and a style that celebrated the precise lines and formal beauty of machines. As a proponent of the industrial aesthetic, Louis Lozowick was involved in organizing the widely-influential 1927 <em>Machine-Age Exposition</em> in New York City. This groundbreaking exhibition included machines and machine parts alongside paintings, sculptures, and drawings by avant-garde artists. This drawing was likely related to Lozowick’s set design for a 1926 production of George Kaiser’s play <em>Gas</em>, about the dehumanization and need for spiritual regeneration caused by industrialization. Lozowick constructed wooden structures of his machine ornaments and projected the images onto screens to create a mechanically-themed set design. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Anonymous gift", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2004.1_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2004.1_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2004.1_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2004.1_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37635", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3224, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3224", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.265", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1966", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1966", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1966", "Disp_Title" : "Landscape 31", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "George Olson", "Sort_Artist" : "Olson, George", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 3/4 x 17 1/4 in. (29.8 x 43.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "17 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Charcoal", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Charcoal and wash ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "One of the most frightening notions tied to modern technology is that its evolution exists outside the control of man. In <em>Landscape 31</em>, artist George Olson creates a landscape in which discarded mass-produced goods obliterate any view of the sky, grass, or trees. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.265_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.265_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.265_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.265_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37624", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3006, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3006", "Disp_Access_No" : "1977.153", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1926-1928", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1926", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1928", "Disp_Title" : "Threshing", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Thomas Hart Benton", "Sort_Artist" : "Benton, Thomas Hart", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 x 12 in. (22.9 x 30.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 in.", "Disp_Width" : "12 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Graphite", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Graphite, ink and watercolor ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Most artists interested in depicting machine subjects looked to the city for inspiration. Thomas Hart Benton’s Regionalist vision looked to the rural areas of middle America for subject matter. In this drawing, Benton illustrates how an engine-powered threshing machine was fundamentally changing agricultural labor. Thomas Hart Benton was less interested in the physicality of the actual machine and more interested in the ways in which machines impacted the lives and labors of man. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Solomon K. Gross", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/77.153_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/77.153_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/77.153_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/77.153_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37629", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }