{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 1533, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1533", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.65", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1965", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1965", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1965", "Disp_Title" : "Landscape III", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Allan D'Arcangelo", "Sort_Artist" : "D'Arcangelo, Allan", "Disp_Dimen" : "39 7/8 x 29 13/16 in. (101.3 x 75.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "39 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "29 13/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "wove paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color Serigraph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Allan D’Arcangelo’s <em>Landscape III</em> is a consideration of the new American landscape of highways, suspended bridges, traffic signs, and billboards. A minor border of sky and grass surround a traffic sign that normally indicates a hairpin curve. Turned on its side and placed over another arrow sign pointing in the opposite direction, the sign’s meaning becomes unclear and potentially dangerous. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.65_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.65_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.65_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.65_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37656", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1222, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1222", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.164", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1967", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1967", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1967", "Disp_Title" : "Ten Pound Hammer", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Thomas Hart Benton", "Sort_Artist" : "Benton, Thomas Hart", "Disp_Dimen" : "13 3/4 x 9 5/8 in. (34.9 x 24.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "13 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In <em>Ten Pound Hammer</em>, Thomas Hart Benton explored the machine’s relationship to man and labor in an “old story of my youth – before the steam hammer beat out John Henry.” According to the American folk legend, John Henry was a heroic African-American man and the greatest steel driver in the late-1900s westward expansion of the railroad. In the story, when the railroad owner brought in a steam-powered hammer, John Henry offered to compete against the machine to save his and his men’s jobs. Although he won the race, John Henry died in victory. The legend of John Henry, which may be based in historical events, grew in popular stories and songs as an allegory of the threat of modernization and the umanning of American labor. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.164_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.164_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.164_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.164_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37657", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2049, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2049", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.245", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1921", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1921", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1921", "Disp_Title" : "Downtown, New York", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Marin", "Sort_Artist" : "Marin, John", "Disp_Dimen" : "6 3/4 x 8 3/4 in. (17.1 x 22.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "6 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "8 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In John Marin’s <em>Downtown, New York</em>, the viewer experiences the dizzying, disorienting sensation of looking up at the buildings while walking on a city street. Marin’s urban vision was one of energy, force, and fragmentation. He sought to capture the frenetic pace of the modern urban experience and the power of skyscrapers as though they themselves were active players in the city’s vitality, as “warring, pushing, pulling forces.” The slashing diagonal form is the elevated railroad that dominated the New York City landscape starting in the 1870s. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.245_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.245_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.245_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.245_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37623", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1615, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1615", "Disp_Access_No" : "1986.12", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1935-1939", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1935", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1939", "Disp_Title" : "Locomotive Standing", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Harold Faye", "Sort_Artist" : "Faye, Harold", "Disp_Dimen" : "12 1/2 x 16 in. (31.8 x 40.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "12 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Helen S. Faye", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/86.12_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/86.12_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/86.12_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/86.12_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37658", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2302, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2302", "Disp_Access_No" : "1980.33", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1977", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1977", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1977", "Disp_Title" : "Violent Turn", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "James Rosenquist", "Sort_Artist" : "Rosenquist, James", "Disp_Dimen" : "36 1/2 x 73 3/4 in. (92.7 x 187.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "36 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "73 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The violence inherent in a machine of steel and glass designed to reach speeds of over 75 miles per hour is the subject of James Rosenquist’s abstract print, <em>Violent Turn</em>. This billboard-sized image highlights the danger such a machine—irrational, destructive—holds for a human body of flesh and bone. This was a threat the artist experienced first-hand in 1971 when he, his wife, and his son were all badly injured in a tragic car accident. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ ] },{ "embark_ID" : 10399, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/10399", "Disp_Access_No" : "2001.17", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1935-1936", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1935", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1936", "Disp_Title" : "White Collar Boys", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Elizabeth M. Olds", "Sort_Artist" : "Olds, Elizabeth M.", "Disp_Dimen" : "13 x 17 3/8 in. (33 x 44.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "13 in.", "Disp_Width" : "17 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "wove paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In <em>White Collar Boys</em>, Elizabeth M. Olds depicts a group of Wall Street men marching down the street with no individuation or sense of independent will. The concept of the automaton—a human/machine amalgamation—was an outgrowth of life in an industrial, urban environment in which almost all facets of life had become automated and removed from nature. In 1922, philosopher and historian Lewis Mumford wrote, “We have had the alternative of humanizing the industrial city or de-humanizing the population. So far we have de-humanized the population.” [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2001.17_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2001.17_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2001.17_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2001.17_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "32733", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1764, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1764", "Disp_Access_No" : "1940.27", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1913", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1913", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1913", "Disp_Title" : "New York Sky Line, Dark Buildings", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Childe Hassam", "Sort_Artist" : "Hassam, Childe", "Disp_Dimen" : "13 3/4 x 7 3/4 in. (34.9 x 19.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "13 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Childe Hassam drew this 1913 profile of the New York City skyline the year construction on the Woolworth Building was completed. At 57 stories, it was the tallest building in the world until the Chrysler Building was completed in 1930. Perhaps it was excitement with the new engineering and construction technologies that led Hassam to exert artistic license in his depiction of the building’s silhouette, thereby dramatizing its height. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Maud Hassam", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/40.27_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/40.27_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/40.27_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/40.27_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37616", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1551, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1551", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.142", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1931", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1931", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1931", "Disp_Title" : "Two Figures and El", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Stuart Davis", "Sort_Artist" : "Davis, Stuart", "Disp_Dimen" : "19 11/16 x 25 7/8 in. (50 x 65.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "19 11/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "25 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : ""Some of the things that have made me want to paint... are: skyscraper architecture… fast travel by train, auto, and aeroplane which brought new and multiple perspectives…" -Stuart Davis, 1954 Stuart Davis was so inspired by the visual discontinuity and fragmentation of the urban environment that he developed a unique, modern visual lexicon to capture it. Without regard for perspective, scale, or the laws of gravity, Davis’s abstracted vision of two individuals waiting on the platform for an elevated train captures all the noise and energy of the scene. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Artists in the Kitchen Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.142_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.142_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.142_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.142_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37622", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1502, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1502", "Disp_Access_No" : "1983.9", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1952", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1952", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1952", "Disp_Title" : "Third Avenue Elevated #4", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Ralston Crawford", "Sort_Artist" : "Crawford, Ralston", "Disp_Dimen" : "19 13/16 x 12 7/8 in. (50.3 x 32.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "19 13/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "12 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Ralston Crawford believed that the “emancipation of the times” would be attained through industrialization. His earlier Precisionist style and his ongoing preoccupation with industry, the machine, and speed can be seen in his painting <a href=”http://magart.rochester.edu/Obj296”><em>Whitestone Bridge</em></a>, 1939-40, in the Memorial Art Galley collection (accession number 51.2). By the time he created this print, <em>Third Avenue El #4</em>, Crawford’s style had become significantly more abstract. Here he captures the ubiquitous vertical steel pylons that support elevated train tracks throughout New York City neighborhoods. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Isabel C. Herdle in memory of Hilda Altschule Coates", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.9_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.9_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.9_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.9_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37633", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2317, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2317", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.325.8", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1972", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1972", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1972", "Disp_Title" : "Desert Wreck", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Salt", "Sort_Artist" : "Salt, John", "Disp_Dimen" : "25 x 35 1/2 in. (63.5 x 90.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "25 in.", "Disp_Width" : "35 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "From the Documenta Portfolio While living and teaching art in America, British artist John Salt created a series of paintings and prints of wrecked cars in an impeccably realistic style. As a Photorealist artist, Salt projects his own photographs onto a surface, and from this projected image he creates his work of art. In technique and subject, Salt’s work represents the camera and the car, two modern machines that have become indispensable and so personally embedded in our lives that they function like extensions of our bodies. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "British", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.325.8_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.325.8_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.325.8_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.325.8_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37626", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1671, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1671", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.332.3", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1970", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1965", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1975", "Disp_Title" : "Paul's Corner", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Ralph Goings", "Sort_Artist" : "Goings, Ralph", "Disp_Dimen" : "18 1/8 x 25 3/4 in. (46 x 65.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "18 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "25 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Offset lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "An early 1950s Ford F100 truck provided Photorealist artist Ralph Goings with a handsome still-life element to anchor his composition in <em>Paul’s Corner</em>. The truck’s smooth line and muscular body, the essence of machine-crafted form, were 20 years old when this image was made. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.332.3_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.332.3_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.332.3_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.332.3_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37628", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }