{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 12646, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/12646", "Disp_Access_No" : "2004.27", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Basket (Olla)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Apache", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Apache", "Disp_Dimen" : "18 x 11 1/4 in. (45.7 x 28.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "18 in.", "Disp_Width" : "11 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Grasses", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Grasses, dyes", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Apache people have long been known for their exquisite basket work. Women made the baskets from thin sticks of willow, cottonwood, or sumac which they collected, soaked and then stitched together. Color was added with a variety of natural dyes. This large olla, or jar-shaped basket, is decorated with human, animal and geometric forms. Made for sale, it took a highly skilled weaver to manage the geometric patterns and designs on such a large basket, which required many months to complete and would have been highly prized. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Gorham Parks", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Basketry", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2004.27_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2004.27_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2004.27_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2004.27_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26555", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }