{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 8946, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8946", "Disp_Access_No" : "1960.15", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1959", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1959", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1959", "Disp_Title" : "Fallen Leaves", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Hagiwara Hideo", "Sort_Artist" : "Hagiwara Hideo", "Disp_Dimen" : "18 1/2 x 13 1/16 in. (47 x 33.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "18 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "13 1/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Hagiwara Hideo began his career as an oil painter, turning to printmaking after World War II. He quickly became one of the most influential and prolific printmakers in post-war Japan. He subscribed to the creative print movement’s philosophy that art is self-expression, and should be the work of a single creator. By the late 1950s, his work was largely abstract. In this print, Hagiwara employed one of his trademark innovative techniques. He first printed the back of the sheet from an inked piece of plywood. By applying pressure to the front of the sheet, he literally pulled the color through the paper, creating a soft patina. Remaining colors and lines were then printed from additional blocks in the traditional way, on the front surface of the sheet. [Label text, 2014]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Stern", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/60.15_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/60.15_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/60.15_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/60.15_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41053", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8952, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8952", "Disp_Access_No" : "1961.17", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1960", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1960", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1960", "Disp_Title" : "Ryoan-Ji, Kyoto (A)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Saito Kiyoshi", "Sort_Artist" : "Saito Kiyoshi", "Disp_Dimen" : "17 15/16 x 23 3/4 in. (45.6 x 60.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "17 15/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "23 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "wove paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Like most of his contemporaries, Saito Kiyoshi worked in series, exploring varied aspects of a given theme through medium and composition. This print is part of a series of Ryoan-Ji, a Zen temple built in Kyoto in 1473, which was famous for its dry garden consisting of 15 rocks arranged on a bed of raked, white gravel. Here, Saito has broken the composition into a series of horizontal bands and circles that, without the title and context, seem abstract. Of particular beauty is his use of the grain of the woodblock to create a variety of textures, all of which visually refer to the materials they represent. The vertical band at the left of the print is surely part of the temple’s wooden building, while the white horizontal band at center depicts the gravel bed on which the rocks are presented. [Label text, 2014]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Stern", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/61.17_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/61.17_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/61.17_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/61.17_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41054", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8947, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8947", "Disp_Access_No" : "1961.18", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1960", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1960", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1960", "Disp_Title" : "Soil", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Hagiwara Hideo", "Sort_Artist" : "Hagiwara Hideo", "Disp_Dimen" : "17 13/16 x 23 11/16 in. (45.3 x 60.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "17 13/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "23 11/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "wove paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Although Hagiwara Hideo’s Soil is an abstract composition, the title leads viewers to “read” its intense values and textures as an intentional representation of earth. He achieves the depth and richness so suggestive of the grittiness of soil by printing on both sides of the paper. Like many woodblock print artists, Hagiwara explored both subject matter and technique by working in series. For the Soil series, he created 22 different prints, all of which investigated different aspects of texture and surface through abstract composition. [Label text, 2014]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Stern", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/61.18_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/61.18_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/61.18_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/61.18_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41055", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8945, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8945", "Disp_Access_No" : "1966.36", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1970", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1965", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1975", "Disp_Title" : "Work Number V-9", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Miyashita Tokio", "Sort_Artist" : "Miyashita Tokio", "Disp_Dimen" : "27 1/4 x 20 in. (69.2 x 50.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "27 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "Japanese paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color woodcut and intaglio", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The son of a metal supplies dealer, Miyashita is known for his prints which combine woodblock with printing from a metal plate to which found metal pieces and wires have been soldered. Miyashita studied metal intaglio printing with Sekino Jun'ichiro, whose The Plum Girl appears in this installation. [Gallery label text, 2004] Miyashita Tokio was best known for making prints from a combination of woodblocks and metal plates. He was the son of a metals dealer, which gave him the early opportunity to learn the tools and processes of metalwork. He studied both processes with master printers in high school and university. The process of combining such different techniques was complex and time consuming. Miyashita would first cut the metal plate from a sheet of zinc. He would then create his design by arranging smaller plates in an assortment of shapes and sizes. Some contained etched lines; others included found objects such as stamped metal fragments. He would then solder these elements to the plate. At this point in the process, he would turn his attention to the medium of woodcut, deciding on colors and the numbers of wooden blocks needed to create the color separations. The final prints resulted in the unique explorations of abstract forms, colors, and textures that characterize Miyashita’s work. [Label text, 2014]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Duplicate of 2005.134, examined both for possible deaccession of one of the prints with Print Preparator Carol Acquilano on 11/21/06, determined that MAG should keep both prints. entered by Cynthia Culbert", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/66.36_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/66.36_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/66.36_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/66.36_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "34517", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8967, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8967", "Disp_Access_No" : "1966.37", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1960", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1955", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1965", "Disp_Title" : "Ceremony, Blue", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Yoshida Hodaka", "Sort_Artist" : "Yoshida Hodaka", "Disp_Dimen" : "22 1/2 x 16 9/16 in. (57.2 x 42.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "22 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "16 9/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "wove paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Yoshida Hodaka’s prints combine an awareness of and training in traditional techniques with his interest in other cultures and beliefs; these include not only Buddhism, but ancient pre-Columbian ceremonies, mythology, and folk art. With its dense blue and purple forms that resemble the inkblots of psychological tests, Ceremony, Blue dates to about 1960, and originates from the latter part of the artist’s “primitive” period. He uses color and form in an attempt to access the most elusive of subject matter, universal human spirituality. Ceremony, Blue is perhaps his effort to create, as one critic called it, an image of something “almost human,” or “something human sensed as ‘present, but not visible.’” [Label text, 2014]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/66.37_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/66.37_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/66.37_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/66.37_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41056", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8958, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8958", "Disp_Access_No" : "1966.38", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1964", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1964", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1964", "Disp_Title" : "Japanese Form (Tomoe)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Takagi Shiro", "Sort_Artist" : "Takagi Shiro", "Disp_Dimen" : "33 3/4 x 23 3/8 in. (85.7 x 59.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "33 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "23 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "wove paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "From the beginning of his career, Takagi Shiro was interested in the print medium. In 1958, he left his studies at the Musashino College of Fine Arts in Tokyo because there was no print faculty, choosing instead to learn independently. Despite his interest in abstraction, however, his primary artistic identification remained Japanese. With its characteristic abstracted forms in a red and ochre palette, Japanese Form (Tomoe) is representative of Takagi’s work before 1971. The word tomoe refers to a specifically Japanese abstract shape, a swirl that resembles a comma. Although its meaning is debated, the form itself is a common design element in Japanese family emblems. [Label text, 2014]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/66.38_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/66.38_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/66.38_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/66.38_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41057", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8921, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8921", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.196", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1973", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1973", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1973", "Disp_Title" : "Red and White Space, No. 349", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Funasaka Yoshisuke", "Sort_Artist" : "Funasaka Yoshisuke", "Disp_Dimen" : "22 x 32 3/4 in. (55.9 x 83.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "22 in.", "Disp_Width" : "32 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Serigraph and relief", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Funasaka Yoshisuke represents the first generation of Japanese artists whose training and careers began after the end of World War II. Over the decades, he has created more than a thousand prints. His work is characterized by an insistent, repetitive combination of objects and shapes with color in his search for the ultimate expression of abstraction. Red and White Space, No. 349 is but one example of hundreds of prints in which Funasaka uses circular dots, vertical and horizontal lines, and color to create a background and foreground suggestive of three-dimensional space. The works in his Space series, like the closely-related group of multiples My Space My Dimension, have similar titles distinguished at times only by a serial number. According to the critic Lawrence Smith, Funasaka thus “dissuades his viewers from looking for explicit meaning. Instead they can concentrate on his world of pure form, an austere and even restricted world of familiar shapes which reveals great subtleties on close scrutiny.” [Label text, 2014]", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.196_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.196_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.196_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.196_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41058", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8941, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8941", "Disp_Access_No" : "1976.118", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1969", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1969", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1969", "Disp_Title" : "Room '69", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Matsutani Takesada", "Sort_Artist" : "Matsutani Takesada", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 x 22 in. (76.2 x 55.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 in.", "Disp_Width" : "22 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Intaglio and serigraph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Takesada Matsutani is a contemporary artist known for his multimedia work. In 1963, he joined the Gutai group, the first radical post-war art collective in Japan. Founded in 1954 and disbanded in 1972, this group was instrumental in creating large-scale multimedia environments, performances, and theatrical events. Matsutani maintained his commitment to the aesthetic and conceptual statements of the movement even after his move to France in 1966. Although the context remains unknown, Room ’69 surely represents the design for an installation space. Installation and performance art remain critical to Matsutani’s work today; he included performance in his first retrospective in the United States, which was held in New York in spring 2013. [Label text, 2014]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel G. Schuman", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/76.118_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/76.118_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/76.118_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/76.118_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41059", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8957, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8957", "Disp_Access_No" : "1979.49", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1964", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1964", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1964", "Disp_Title" : "Good Evening", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Tajima Hiroyuki", "Sort_Artist" : "Tajima Hiroyuki", "Disp_Dimen" : "18 7/8 x 12 5/16 in. (47.9 x 31.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "18 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "12 5/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Tajima Hiroyuki specialized in Western painting during his art studies at Nihon University and the Tokyo School of the Arts. In 1946, his interest in Dada and Surrealism led him to join Bijutsu Bunka Kyokai, a group of artists dedicated to reviving the abstract ideals that had been suppressed during World War II. Good Evening, with its dense pigmentation and rich, textural use of color, exemplifies his typical style of the 1950s and 1960s. Although the forms are abstract, his work of that period reflects the ideals of Asian calligraphy, traditional Japanese painting structure, and a sense of space derived partly from Zen Buddhist beliefs. [Label text, 2014]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Ashby", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/79.49_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/79.49_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/79.49_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/79.49_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "38278", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8938, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8938", "Disp_Access_No" : "1992.22", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1964", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1964", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1964", "Disp_Title" : "Boy with Bird", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Ikeda Masuo", "Sort_Artist" : "Ikeda Masuo", "Disp_Dimen" : "16 13/16 x 9 1/16 in. (42.7 x 23 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "16 13/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 1/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Boy with Bird depicts a nude boy, his legs drawn to his chestand surrounded by a womblike halo of light, with a small bird perched on his right shoulder. This is an enigmatic print made by one of the most famous Japanese artists of the 1960s and 1970s. Masuo Ikeda was known in his home country as a maruchi taranto, or multiple talent. His greatest interest during high school was not art, but the western literature and philosophy by writers as diverse as Sartre, Kafka, and the Surrealists. Self-taught as an artist, Masuo struggled financially until the early 1960s, when he turned from painting to printmaking. He won several prizes in Japan, but achieved his greatest triumphs abroad, including a one-man show in 1965 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. It was the first time in history that MoMA had so honored a Japanese artist. [Label text, 2014]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Helen Kristal", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/92.22_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/92.22_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/92.22_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/92.22_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41061", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8948, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8948", "Disp_Access_No" : "1992.23", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1964", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1964", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1964", "Disp_Title" : "Horses above the Yellow Horizon", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Nakayama Tadashi", "Sort_Artist" : "Nakayama Tadashi", "Disp_Dimen" : "32 5/8 x 25 13/16 in. (82.8 x 65.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "32 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "25 13/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Nakayama Tadashi worked in a style that combined influences from traditional Japanese ukiyo-e prints and Western painting. He is best known for large and complex woodcuts that often required 50 or more blocks and incorporated metallic inks and gold and silver leaf. Horses were a recurring theme throughout most of Nakayama’s career. The highly stylized, dynamic horses of this ornate print, with its rich but limited color palette of black, gold, and yellow, are typical of his work of the 1960s; they show his fascination with Indian and Persian miniature paintings, which he first saw on his travels to Turkey and India in 1962–63. [Label text, 2014] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Helen Kristal", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/92.23_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/92.23_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/92.23_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/92.23_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41062", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8920, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8920", "Disp_Access_No" : "1994.26", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1967", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1967", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1967", "Disp_Title" : "Enclosure 33", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Amano Kunihiro", "Sort_Artist" : "Amano Kunihiro", "Disp_Dimen" : "23 9/16 x 16 13/16 in. (59.9 x 42.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "23 9/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "16 13/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color woodcut and embossing", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Amano Kunihiro is a self-taught printmaker; like so many of his generation, his work shows the influence of the artist Munakata Shiko, also represented in this exhibition. His earliest prints used exposed wood grain to capture representational images; by the late 1950s, his style moved rapidly toward abstraction. Enclosure 33 is one of a large series of prints from the mid-1960s in which he explores the combinations of a variety of shapes, form, and textures. [Label text, 2014]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Fred Ladwig", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/94.26_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/94.26_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/94.26_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/94.26_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41063", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8953, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8953", "Disp_Access_No" : "1996.58", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1976", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1976", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1976", "Disp_Title" : "Barn in Aizu", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Saito Kiyoshi", "Sort_Artist" : "Saito Kiyoshi", "Disp_Dimen" : "18 1/8 x 23 13/16 in. (46 x 60.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "18 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "23 13/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Saito Kiyoshi’s fascination with his birthplace of Aizu, in Fukushima Prefecture, resulted in the longest-running series of his career. The first print was done in 1939; he completed the 41st, called Winter in Aizu, in 1980. Barn in Aizu is an example of Saito’s later work, in which he seeks to represent the essence of nature and the intellectual beauty of architecture through the use of a muted color palette, the wood grain of the block, and a somewhat flattened two-dimensional picture plane. [Label text, 2014]", "Dedication" : "Estates of Maurice R. and Maxine B. Forman", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/96.58_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/96.58_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/96.58_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/96.58_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41064", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3919, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3919", "Disp_Access_No" : "1996.101", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1956-1958", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1956", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1958", "Disp_Title" : "Christ", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Munakata Shiko", "Sort_Artist" : "Munakata Shiko", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 x 10 7/8 in. (61 x 27.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 in.", "Disp_Width" : "10 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Munakata Shiko was a dominant figure in Japanese printmaking, especially after the close of World War II. He rose to international fame in 1951, when he exhibited in São Paolo; in 1956, he won the first prize for printmaking at the Venice Biennale. The myriad influences on his work include his early studies of modern Western artists, particularly Henri Matisse; a strong interest in Zen Buddhism; and the Japanese creative print and folk art movements. Munakata designed Christ as one of 12 prints created for the Urasenke school of tea ceremony. In this tradition, a single hanging scroll, usually a seasonal Zen Buddhist calligraphy or ink painting of a contemplative scene, was displayed in a tea room alcove. Although Munakata was certainly aware of this custom, he chose to incorporate Western images, including this one, into his work. [Label text, 2014] Munakata Shiko was a dominant figure in Japanese printmaking, especially after the close of World War II. He rose to international fame in 1951, when he exhibited in São Paolo; in 1956, he won the first prize for printmaking at the Venice Biennale. The myriad influences on his work include his early studies of modern Western artists, particularly Henri Matisse; a strong interest in Zen Buddhism; and the Japanese creative print and folk art movements. Munakata designed Christ as one of 12 prints created for the Urasenke school of tea ceremony. In this tradition, a single hanging scroll, usually a seasonal Zen Buddhist calligraphy or ink painting of a contemplative scene, was displayed in a tea room alcove. Although Munakata was certainly aware of this custom, he chose to incorporate Western images, including this one, into his work. [Label text, 2014] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Zanetta Schutt Parks and the Naramore family", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/96.101_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/96.101_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/96.101_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/96.101_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "34550", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3923, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3923", "Disp_Access_No" : "1997.171", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "The Plum Girl", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Sekino Junichiro", "Sort_Artist" : "Sekino Junichiro", "Disp_Dimen" : "15 1/4 x 9 11/16 in. (38.8 x 24.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "15 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 11/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Sekino Junichiro was affiliated with the “First Thursday Society” of Onchi K?shir?, the founder of the s?saku hanga, or creative print, movement. Like many printmakers of his generation, he was strongly influenced by the work of Munakata Shiko, whose work is also exhibited here. Junichiro’s woodcuts include traditional themes such as the Kabuki theater, portraits of well-known personalities, and a series of the 53 stations of the Taikido Road—the same subject and number as those by the legendary Edo printmaker And? Hiroshige. Junichiro quickly became popular among western collectors after he began to exhibit internationally in 1955. He taught at the Pratt Institute in 1958, and at Oregon State University and the University of Washington in the 1960s. The Plum Girl, titled and signed in English rather than Japanese, probably dates to this period. [Label text, 2014] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Carl A. Talbot", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/97.171_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/97.171_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/97.171_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/97.171_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41065", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 20888, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/20888", "Disp_Access_No" : "2007.40", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1956", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1956", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1956", "Disp_Title" : "Fountain of Earth #1", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Yoshida Masaji", "Sort_Artist" : "Yoshida Masaji", "Disp_Dimen" : "23 3/4 x 39 in. (60.3 x 99.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "23 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "39 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Fountain of Earth, with its bold black and geometrical composition, was part of Masaji Yoshida’s earliest print series. His interest in exploring the effects of surface quality, soft shapes, simple forms, and restrained use of color set him apart from many other s?saku hanga (creative print) artists. He once said that he was seeking serenity in his work, and, as the titles of many of his prints (Fountain of Earth, Peace-Evening, and Earth No. 3) suggest, the shapes in his compositions and the manner in which they are arranged frequently remind us of the earth, sky, and gardens of the natural world. [Label text, 2014]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Alec E. Hazlett in memory of Doris and McCrea Hazlett", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2007.40_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2007.40_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2007.40_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2007.40_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "40750", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }