{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 897, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/897", "Disp_Access_No" : "1986.5", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1918", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1913", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1923", "Disp_Title" : "Abraham Lincoln", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "George Grey Barnard", "Sort_Artist" : "Barnard, George Grey", "Disp_Dimen" : "21 x 11 7/8 x 14 7/16 in. (53.3 x 30.2 x 36.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "21 in.", "Disp_Width" : "11 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Marble", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Marble", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/86.5_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/86.5_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/86.5_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/86.5_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12504", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 202, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/202", "Disp_Access_No" : "1978.15", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1865", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1865", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1865", "Disp_Title" : "The Night Before the Battle", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "James Henry Beard", "Sort_Artist" : "Beard, James Henry", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 1/2 x 44 1/2 in. (77.5 x 113 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "44 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "James Beard had first-hand experience as a captain in the Union army during the Civil War. This painting, completed in the year the war ended, is a dramatic statement about the ever-present possibility of death on the battlefield. [Gallery label text, 2007] Were it not for details like the skeleton keeping vigil behind the cannon, the cruciform composition of the flag draped over the sleeping soldier, and the scattered playing cards suggestive of luck and chance, this painting would be a simple narrative about the Civil War. However, such potent symbolism imbues the work with layers of spiritual significance. Perhaps the reminders of death and sacrifice that the artist included in his masterful painting emerged from his firsthand experience in the Union Army during the Civil War. The meticulously selected and carefully arranged details attest to the poignancy of the soldiers' situation and contrast with the implied violence that will occur on the morrow. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Dr. Ronald M. Lawrence", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/78.15_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/78.15_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/78.15_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/78.15_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "17539", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "New access image derived by Lu Harper from Master scan", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 10476, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/10476", "Disp_Access_No" : "2001.27", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "October 1922", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "10/1922", "_Disp_End_Date" : "10/1922", "Disp_Title" : "Autumn Brook", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "George Bellows", "Sort_Artist" : "Bellows, George", "Disp_Dimen" : "16 1/2 x 24 in. (41.9 x 61 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "16 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "panel", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on panel", "Info_Page_Comm" : "With his unflinching paintings of brutal boxing matches and urban tenements, George Bellows made a name for himself in the early years of the century as a central Urban Realist artist. In this later painting, "Autumn Brook," the modernist influence of expressive color, space and line is visible in Bellows’ lyrical painting of the countryside near his summer home in Woodstock, NY. [Gallery label text, 2007] "Autumn Brook" contains the archetypal elements present in Bellows's finest Woodstock landscapes, including water, rolling hills, mountains, animal life, vegetation, and a dramatic sky. Bellows's choice of vivid colors celebrates the magnificence of nature and the artist's joy at finding himself immersed in it. The active brush strokes prove his ability to paint with a controlled sense of abandon. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Bequest of Muriel Englander Klepper and Marion Stratton Gould Fund In honor of Marjorie B. Searl", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2001.27_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2001.27_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2001.27_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2001.27_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "13430", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 205, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/205", "Disp_Access_No" : "1947.13", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1914", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1914", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1914", "Disp_Title" : "Evening Group", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "George Bellows", "Sort_Artist" : "Bellows, George", "Disp_Dimen" : "25 x 30 in. (63.5 x 76.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "25 in.", "Disp_Width" : "30 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "board", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on composition board", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This painting portrays the artist with his wife, Emma, and daughter, Anne, on vacation on Monhegan Island off the coast of Maine. Two neighbor children occupy the right side of the canvas. [Gallery label text, 2007] In the summer of 1914, painter George Bellows convinced his wife, Emma, to travel to Monhegan Island off the coast of Maine along with their young daughter, Anne. There, he hoped to paint more of the stunning seascapes he had worked on so successfully in past years. Evening Group depicts Emma and Anne on the left, the artist in the middle, and two neighbor children on the right. Based in New York City during much of the year, Bellows found that the harsh beauty of places like Monhegan Island provided him with subjects that contrasted dramatically with his acclaimed urban scenes. He first visited the island in 1911 in the company of his teacher and mentor, Robert Henri, and wrote enthusiastically to Emma: “The Island is only a mile wide and two miles long, but it looks as large as the Rocky Mountains. It’s three times as high as Montauk [Long Island] and all black and grey rock. Beautiful pine forests and wonderful varieties of all kinds…” In another letter, he lamented “my head is full of millions of great pictures which I will never have time to paint.” [Gallery label text, 2005]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Related_Children" : [ { "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3002", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Study for "Evening Group"" } ], "Curator" : "Note that the online catalogue raisonne lists the inclusion of this work in a 1926 exhibition at the Los Angeles Museum of Art, but an exhibition of that date that might contain this work could not be found.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/47.13_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/47.13_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/47.13_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/47.13_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12371", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/42bellows1.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/42bellows1.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/42bellows1.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/42bellows1.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "23028", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "CMYK tif image from Monroe Litho for Seeing America catalogue. Cannot be converted to RGB for web use without considerable color adjustment.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 211, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/211", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1928", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1928", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1928", "Disp_Title" : "Boomtown", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Thomas Hart Benton", "Sort_Artist" : "Benton, Thomas Hart", "Disp_Dimen" : "46 1/8 x 54 1/4 in. (117.2 x 137.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "46 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "54 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Egg yolk and oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Egg yolk and oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Early in his career, Thomas Hart Benton was involved in the American abstract movement, Synchromism. In the 1920s, Benton embarked on a style that incorporated Synchromist rhythmic line and expressive color with representational imagery of rural America. With this major shift in style, Benton established the Regionalist movement. Many consider Boomtown to be the artist’s first Regionalist masterpiece. [Gallery label text, 2007] Boomtown is one of the masterpieces of the Gallery's collection because of its impressive and unique depiction of an American landscape. When Thomas Hart Benton sketched this panoramic scene from a second floor window, the smoky fire on the horizon signified progress, not pollution. Borger, Texas was a boomtown that sprang to life in 1926 after a refinery company hit a gusher that produced 5000 gallons of oil a day. Benton is one of the three major American Regionalists (the other two are Grant Wood and John Steuart Curry), so called because most of their subjects were about life in the rural heartland of America. While Benton was not a fan of contemporary modernist painting, and in fact disdained artists who painted in the abstract style, he couldn't help but be influenced by the curvy and streamlined aesthetic of his times and the way in which artists were reinterpreting three-dimensional space. Consider the way in which the people, buildings and landscape are layered from top to bottom on the canvas, rather than being laid out carefully from front to back in the manner of traditional artistic renderings. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.1_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.1_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.1_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.1_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12375", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Transparency rescanned at much larger size for publication as _P2 image", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.1_A7.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.1_A7.jpg", "PreviewPath" : 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"https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.1_A10.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.1_A10.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "29921", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Temporary image- do not use for print or web", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.1_A6.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.1_A6.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.1_A6.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.1_A6.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "29945", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Temporary image- do not use for print or web", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.1_A9.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.1_A9.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.1_A9.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.1_A9.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "29946", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Temporary image- do not use for print or web", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.1_R1.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.1_R1.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.1_R1.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.1_R1.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "37729", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.1_R2.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.1_R2.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.1_R2.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.1_R2.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "37730", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.1_R3.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.1_R3.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.1_R3.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.1_R3.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "37731", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.1_R4.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.1_R4.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.1_R4.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.1_R4.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "37732", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.1_R5.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.1_R5.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.1_R5.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.1_R5.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "37733", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 214, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/214", "Disp_Access_No" : "1992.78", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1865", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1865", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1865", "Disp_Title" : "The Sierras Near Lake Tahoe, California", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Albert Bierstadt", "Sort_Artist" : "Bierstadt, Albert", "Disp_Dimen" : "14 15/16 x 21 1/16 in. (38 x 53.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "14 15/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "21 1/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "panel", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on panel", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Bierstadt was one of the most gifted artists to depict the stunning mountain views of the expanding frontier, far west of the Hudson River region that had inspired earlier American landscape painters. He was a member of the generation of artist-explorers who traveled with expeditions or in their footsteps and recorded the visual experience. MAG's painting quietly but masterfully convinces us of the grandeur of mountains and sky by including the tiny deer to give a sense of scale, and by suffusing the surface of the painting with a warm, glowing palette. ", "Dedication" : "Clara and Edwin Strasenburgh Fund and Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/92.78_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/92.78_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/92.78_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/92.78_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12517", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Note: Master image contains wrong accession # from photoshoot: 75.21. Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008. Needs curatorial approval for other uses.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 222, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/222", "Disp_Access_No" : "1941.24", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1862-1863", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1862", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1863", "Disp_Title" : "Trial Scene ", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "David Gilmour Blythe", "Sort_Artist" : "Blythe, David Gilmour", "Disp_Dimen" : "22 1/4 x 27 in. (56.5 x 68.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "22 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "27 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Blythe’s painting shows a scene of frontier justice in a rough building serving as a courtroom. A backwoods “lawyer” at the center either defends or makes his case against a shackled prisoner at the right. However, some elements of the scene, including the onlookers—some armed with long guns, some distracted by a card game—and the pot and sack at the lower left labelled “tar” and “feathers,” reveal that this is an extrajudicial proceeding. The prisoner whittles unconcernedly while his fate is decided, suggesting that this is a typically satirical genre scene for Blythe, who made other paintings of farcical trials and caricatured politics. [Gallery label text, 2019]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Originally purchased through R. T. Miller fund-- later shifted to Marion Stratton Gould fund. The reason could not be determined.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/41.24_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/41.24_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/41.24_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/41.24_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12354", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print master derived 11/23/09 by Lu Harper for Seeing America lesson plans. Needs to be okayed by Curatorial before any other use.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 228, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/228", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.47", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1846", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1846", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1846", "Disp_Title" : "The Indian Hunter", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "DeWitt Clinton Boutelle", "Sort_Artist" : "Boutelle, DeWitt Clinton", "Disp_Dimen" : "32 5/8 x 47 1/8 in. (82.9 x 119.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "32 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "47 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.47_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.47_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.47_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.47_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12494", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008. Needs curatorial approval for other uses. Color was adjusted closer to the scan in the Seeing America book...less yellow than Access image shown here.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3566, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3566", "Disp_Access_No" : "1944.53", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1918", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1918", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1918", "Disp_Title" : "Cat-Eyed House", "Alt_Title" : "Snow-lit House", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Charles Ephraim Burchfield", "Sort_Artist" : "Burchfield, Charles Ephraim", "Disp_Dimen" : "18 1/4 x 22 1/4 in. (46.4 x 56.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "18 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "22 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Watercolor and gouache", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor and gouache with graphite on paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/44.53_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/44.53_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/44.53_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/44.53_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "13423", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3567, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3567", "Disp_Access_No" : "1945.68", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1922", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1922", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1922", "Disp_Title" : "Springtime in the Pool", "Alt_Title" : "Sun Reflected in the Pool", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Charles Ephraim Burchfield", "Sort_Artist" : "Burchfield, Charles Ephraim", "Disp_Dimen" : "21 1/8 x 18 5/8 in. (53.7 x 47.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "21 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "18 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Watercolor", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor on paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Charles H. Babcock", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/45.68_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/45.68_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/45.68_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/45.68_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12369", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3568, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3568", "Disp_Access_No" : "1947.105", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1935", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1935", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1935", "Disp_Title" : "Telegraph Pole", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Charles Ephraim Burchfield", "Sort_Artist" : "Burchfield, Charles Ephraim", "Disp_Dimen" : "23 3/8 x 20 7/8 in. (59.4 x 53 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "23 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Watercolor", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor, charcoal and graphite", "Info_Page_Comm" : "As a symbol of American invention and progress, the telegraph pole and its wires frame a depressing landscape. The curved pole, clearly a tree cut down and stripped of its bark and limbs, is a powerful metaphor for the abuse that man and nature experience under the unstoppable momentum of industry. Railroad tracks lined by austere workers’ huts lead the viewer’s eyes back to an industrial inferno. Buffalo artist Charles Burchfield felt a great deal of reverence for the natural world. His nuanced depictions of the industrial landscape were indictments of environmental abuse. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Charles H. Babcock", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/47.105_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/47.105_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/47.105_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/47.105_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "33650", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "converted from Seeing America CMYK image for web use", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/47.105_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/47.105_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/47.105_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/47.105_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "39114", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 922, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/922", "Disp_Access_No" : "1964.27", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1935", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1935", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1935", "Disp_Title" : "Untitled Standing Mobile", "Alt_Title" : "Untitled Mobile", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Alexander Calder", "Sort_Artist" : "Calder, Alexander", "Disp_Dimen" : "105 1/2 x 72 x 41 in. (268 x 182.9 x 104.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "105 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "72 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Iron", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Iron, steel and paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Alexander Calder was one of the most important and influential sculptors of the twentieth century. He is best known for his mobiles, kinetic or moving sculptures usually painted in black and the primary colors of red, yellow, and blue. Calder’s sculptures delight people of all ages for their charm, whimsy, and grace. If this mobile, with its rather bulky counter-weight, seems less graceful than some of Calder’s others, it may be because it is one of the earliest of his mobiles made for the outdoors. Created in 1935 of iron rather than the artist’s typical sheet metal, it is a very rare and relatively large early example. Soon after this, Calder would work in metal far less frequently. As the U.S. geared up for the World War II effort, metal became a very scarce material. This sculpture was given to the Memorial Art Gallery by Charlotte Whitney Allen, who commissioned it in 1934 for her garden on Oliver Street in Rochester. [Summer 2015]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Charlotte Whitney Allen", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Parts labelled individually January 2016: A=yellow and blue disks; B=red disk; C=white disk; D=black counter-weight; E=pyramid-shaped base", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/64.27_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/64.27_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/64.27_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/64.27_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "12418", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Mobile in original location, June 17, 2000", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/64.27_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/64.27_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/64.27_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/64.27_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12419", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/64.27_R1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/64.27_R1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/64.27_R1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/64.27_R1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "18868", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "from Sets-Rochester 12/7/1934, Photo sent to Mrs. Allen by Calder with proposal for "object" for garden (this model not built)", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 255, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/255", "Disp_Access_No" : "1941.25", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1857", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1857", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1857", "Disp_Title" : "Shooting Flamingoes", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "George Catlin", "Sort_Artist" : "Catlin, George", "Disp_Dimen" : "19 x 26 1/2 in. (48.3 x 67.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "19 in.", "Disp_Width" : "26 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Shooting Flamingoes is a shocking and confusing painting to 21st century sensibilities. To our eyes, the mass killing of the flamingoes is unthinkable, sensitive as we are to the role hunting has played in the extinction of many species over the past century and a half. To our eyes, the startled native guide is an offensive stereotype, a comic, cartoon-like character next to the upright, composed figure of the hunter. In pre-Civil War America, George Catlin, a well-known artist of the period, was commissioned to create a nine-part series to glorify the Colt rifle. Shooting Flamingoes was one image in that advertising campaign. While the original intent of this painting doesn’t invalidate our contemporary reactions, it does set the piece within a historical context that explains its initial point-of-view. [Gallery label text, 2004]", "Dedication" : "R. T. Miller Fund, 1941, transferred to Marion Stratton Gould Fund, 1949", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Originally purchased through R. T. Miller fund-- later shifted to Marion Stratton Gould fund. The reason could not be determined.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/41.25_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/41.25_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/41.25_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/41.25_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12355", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 256, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/256", "Disp_Access_No" : "1943.43", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "after 1828", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1829", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1838", "Disp_Title" : "View of West Point", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Thomas Chambers", "Sort_Artist" : "Chambers, Thomas", "Disp_Dimen" : "22 1/4 x 30 1/8 in. (56.5 x 76.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "22 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "30 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "At a time when there was no photography, videography, or cinema, people relied on landscape paintings to be their windows onto the world beyond their immediate horizons. Thomas Chambers capitalized on people's interest in the American landscape. He is noted for his many picturesque views of early 19th-century America, including this one of the United States Military Academy at West Point on the Hudson River. Chambers worked from personal observation, but also consulted many British and American prints for his paintings. You should not be surprised if you visit other museums and see a painting similar to this one. At least six other views of West Point were painted by Chambers. [Gallery label text, 2004]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Elsie McMath Cole in memory of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Morrison H. McMath", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/43.43_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/43.43_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/43.43_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/43.43_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "39024", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "No print-level image was derived at the time of photography, so 43.43_M1 was cropped and processed 8/30/12 to make a TIF and then a new JPG was derived", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 278, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/278", "Disp_Access_No" : "1994.40", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1846-1847", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1846", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1847", "Disp_Title" : "Genesee Scenery", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Thomas Cole", "Sort_Artist" : "Cole, Thomas", "Disp_Dimen" : "6 1/4 x 4 3/8 in. (15.9 x 11.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "6 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "panel", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on panel", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Like many artists, Thomas Cole traveled extensively, sketching views that he would later include in finished (and much larger) paintings. On a trip to the Upstate New York region, he sketched Deh-ga-ya-soh Creek at what is now Letchworth State Park in Mount Morris. Later that year, he used the sketch to create this study, which ultimately became the subject of the 'Genesee Scenery' (1847, 51 x 39 1/2 inches, owned by the Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design). [Adapted from gallery label text, 2007]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Howard and Florence Merritt", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : ""Thomas Cole: Landscape into History" has picture of the finished version, ''Genesee Scenery,'' 1847, which is owned by The Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence. Subject of the painting is Oay-ga-ya-soh Creek at Letchworth State Park in Mount Morris, New York, identified by Letchworth park rangers.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/94.40_R1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/94.40_R1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/94.40_R1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/94.40_R1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "12634", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "THIS PAINTING IS NOT IN THE MAG COLLECTION. complete credit line: Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design; Jesse Metcalf Fund", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/94.40_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/94.40_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/94.40_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": 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In 1911, Colin Campbell Cooper wrote: "Mrs. Cooper [painter Emma Lampert Cooper] says that the Main Street Bridge picture, whenever it has been shown at art exhibitions, has attracted much attention, because people are surprised that such a foreign looking place can be found in America…People always compare it with the Ponte Vecchio at Florence, which rather proves my assertion that 'any old thing' is good enough when the sun falls on it right." [Gallery label text, 2007]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Hiram W. 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(74.6 x 62.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "29 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Nathaniel Hurd (1730-1778), silversmith, goldsmith, and engraver, was a member of a distinguished Boston family of silversmiths. In addition to creating a number of silver pieces, he was well-known for his bookplates, which were designed for many distinguished colonial families including Loyalists and a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and were based on heraldic motifs (to which they may or may not have been entitled). Hurd also designed a plate for his own family, as well as bookplates for both Harvard and Dartmouth Colleges. The bookplates provide an unusual link to the social and intellectual climate of the times, and literally speak volumes about sociocultural aspirations of eighteenth-century America. Hurd was a contemporary of Copley’s. This ca. 1765 portrait, Copley’s first to depict a fellow artisan in working costume, had been preceded by an earlier miniature that Copley had painted of Hurd in 1755. [Gallery label text, 1996] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/44.2_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/44.2_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/44.2_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/44.2_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12367", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 296, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/296", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1939-1940", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1939", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1940", "Disp_Title" : "Whitestone Bridge", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Ralston Crawford", "Sort_Artist" : "Crawford, Ralston", "Disp_Dimen" : "40 1/4 x 32 in. (102.2 x 81.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "40 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "32 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Ralston Crawford’s strong linear style and simplified form and palette in Whitestone Bridge are representative of the modern Precisionist style. Precisionist artists celebrated industrialization and technology with a visual language that evoked the purity and perfection of the machine. [Gallery label text, 2007] The Whitestone Bridge, linking The Bronx and Queens, was opened in 1939 just in time for the New York World's Fair. The suspension bridge routed travelers coming to the Fair from Upstate and New England away from the congestion of New York City. At the same time, Crawford was moving away from painting traditional landscapes and searching for a vocabulary that was closer in spirit to the streamlined, industrial aesthetic that he was observing in the world around him. The Whitestone Bridge was an excellent match for his artistic aspirations. The sleek and futuristic lines of the Whitestone Bridge matched the Trylon and Perisphere logo of the World's Fair, which was intended to signify progress and the World of Tomorrow. By 1944, when this painting was acquired by the Encyclopedia Britannica Collection, the sleek and elegant Whitestone Bridge had become an icon of contemporary design. The curator traveled to New York City to determine whether the bridge really looks as though it extends back into space with no land visible on the other side. And, in fact, Crawford's thrilling vantage point can be experienced by taking the bus across the bridge - for a brief instant, the first-time crosser experiences the view that Crawford recorded: a slim line of road, held up by wires, sailing across the water with no end in sight. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Related_Children" : [ { "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3071", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Study for "Whitestone Bridge"" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3583", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Study for "Whitestone Bridge"" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "297", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Study for Fortune Magazine" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "298", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Study for Fortune Magazine" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3367", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Whitestone Bridge" } ], "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.2_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.2_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.2_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.2_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12382", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008. Image is 800ppi but only 2.5 x 3.5". Needs curatorial approval for other uses.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 568, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/568", "Disp_Access_No" : "1983.13", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1909", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1909", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1909", "Disp_Title" : "Woman in an Ermine Collar", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Kathleen McEnery Cunningham", "Sort_Artist" : "Cunningham, Kathleen McEnery", "Disp_Dimen" : "76 7/8 x 38 3/8 in. (195.3 x 97.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "76 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "38 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Kathleen McEnery’s early training as an Urban Realist drew her to depict reality with an uncompromising eye. The artist was about twenty-two years old and living in Paris when she painted this bold and modern woman. McEnery lived in New York, Madrid, and Paris before she moved to Rochester, NY in 1914. [Gallery label text, 2007] Kathleen McEnery was about twenty-two years old and living in Paris when she painted Woman in an Ermine Collar. She lived and trained in New York, Madrid, and Paris before moving to Rochester in 1914. McEnery played a major role in Rochester’s cultural circles, and painted throughout her life while raising a family with her husband, Francis Cunningham of the Cunningham Car Company. McEnery’s training with the American realist master Robert Henri drew her to depict with honesty the conditions of modern life. The result is this woman’s unapologetic presence. She is an embodiment of the New Woman – a cultural phenomenon of the growing women’s rights movement, of which the artist was an ardent supporter. The New Woman rebelled against traditional gender roles and was independent, confident, and physically active. As this woman’s dashing manner illustrates, she was equally as comfortable in the public domain as would be any man. [Gallery label text, 2006] In New York City, Kathleen McEnery studied with Robert Henri. She also studied abroad and exhibited two paintings at the controversial 1913 Armory Show in New York City. After her marriage to Rochesterian Francis Cunningham, whose family owned the Cunningham Carriage Factory, she continued painting in a studio off the family's home on 10 South Goodman St., now on the campus of the Rochester Museum and Science Center. As Mrs. Cunningham, she was a member of the Gallery's Board of Managers from 1927 through 1971. The model's direct and intelligent expression and forthright pose suggests the "new woman," ready to be a participant in contemporary society rather than remain at home. Certainly, McEnery herself, who had graduated from Pratt Institute and lived on her own in New York City, fit that description as well. [Gallery label text, 2003]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Joan Cunningham Williams, Peter Cunningham, and Michael McEnery Cunningham", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.13_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.13_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.13_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.13_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12491", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print master derived 11/23/09 by Lu Harper for Seeing America lesson plans. Needs to be okayed by Curatorial for any other use.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 333, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/333", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.3", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1931-1932", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1931", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1932", "Disp_Title" : "Landscape with Garage Lights", "Alt_Title" : "Garage Lights", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Stuart Davis", "Sort_Artist" : "Davis, Stuart", "Disp_Dimen" : "32 x 41 7/8 in. (81.3 x 106.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "32 in.", "Disp_Width" : "41 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Stuart Davis began as a student of the Urban Realist style, but upon seeing the many European modernist works on display at the New York Armory Show of 1913, the artist found his passion for abstraction. The influence of the broken-up and flattened surfaces of Cubism and the syncopated rhythms of American jazz contributed to Davis’ personal style. [Gallery label text, 2007] Gloucester, one of Massachusetts's oldest seaports, was a summer home for painter Stuart Davis from the time he was a young man of twenty-two. This view of the harbor clearly captivated him by the early 1930s, and preliminary studies of this painting reveal how carefully he considered the scene and translated it into paint, all the while deliberately conveying a sense of simplicity and speed in its execution. After a Parisian stay in the late 1920s, Davis returned to the United States with a new way of seeing things. The goal for him was to paint an expressive, abstracted version of the world around him, rather than a photographic simulacrum. As modernism challenged the nature of reality and how it is perceived, Davis reminds us here that it is possible to see two sides of a building at once, and that often it really looks like only half of a ship is in the water even though our brains convince us that the other half is hidden behind the fish warehouse. Flatness and simplification of forms were characteristics that distinguished work of influential European painters like Picasso and Matisse, whose work Davis would have encountered during his stay in France. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Related_Children" : [ { "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3088", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Study for "Landscape with Garage Lights"" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3089", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "From Sketchbook 3, Drawing for "Landscape with Garage Lights"" } ], "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.3_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.3_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.3_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.3_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12383", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.3_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.3_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.3_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.3_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "53893", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Rescanned transparency at larger size for reproduction. New JPG derived from that larger TIF.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 341, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/341", "Disp_Access_No" : "1957.79", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1908", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1903", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1913", "Disp_Title" : "Portrait in a Brown Dress", "Alt_Title" : "Lady in Yellow", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Thomas W. Dewing", "Sort_Artist" : "Dewing, Thomas W.", "Disp_Dimen" : "20 x 15 1/2 in. (50.8 x 39.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "20 in.", "Disp_Width" : "15 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "panel", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on wood panel", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Around the same time that Thomas Dewing painted this portrait of a young woman reading a book, American art critic Charles Caffin wrote about Dewing's work: "Generations of repressed emotion have made [Dewing's women] incapable of passion; strenuousness survives only in supersensitive nerves; their sole religion is the worship of self…They are motionless in an atmosphere from which all human warmth has been sucked, in a vacuum drained of intellectual and emotional nourishment. These bodily shapes are not of flesh and blood; they are the essence distilled from the withering of what is womanly, the mere fragrance of dead rose-leaves." Thomas Dewing's depictions of genteel, ethereal young women engaged in contemplative and artistic pursuits stand in contrast to the bold and vigorous "New Woman," the feminist model of woman who emerged during this same period. The "New Woman" earned a living and wanted the vote and was not content to be marginalized in gauzy environments like the ones created by Dewing. This painting is in its original frame, which is similar to those designed by Stanford White, who created opulent and decorative environments for many of Dewing's Gilded Age patrons. (1). Charles H. Caffin, The Story of American Painting: The Evolution of American Painting from Colonial Times to the Present (New York: Frederick A. Stokes Company, 1907) , 189. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Millar Lindsay III, in memory of Jesse Williams and Grace Curtice Lindsay and their daughter, Carolyn Lindsay White", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/57.79_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/57.79_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/57.79_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/57.79_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12405", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 348, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/348", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.4", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1938", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1938", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1938", "Disp_Title" : "Cars in a Sleet Storm", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Arthur Dove", "Sort_Artist" : "Dove, Arthur", "Disp_Dimen" : "15 x 21 in. (38.1 x 53.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "15 in.", "Disp_Width" : "21 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Painted in Geneva, NY, Cars in a Sleet Storm is representative of Arthur Dove’s personalized abstract vocabulary with which he responded to the world around him. Dove, along with Georgia O’Keeffe and Marsden Hartley, were members of a group of modernist American artists championed by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz in his 291 Gallery in Manhattan. [Gallery label text, 2007] Arthur G. Dove was a native of Geneva, New York, about 46 miles from Rochester. Early on, rural New York State did not satisfy Dove's desire for a more engaged artistic life, and a few years after the turn of the 20th century, he moved to New York City and then to Paris. On his return to the United States in 1910, he began to paint abstract landscapes, and is considered one of America's first abstract painters. Dove's work was actively exhibited by photographer Alfred Stieglitz in his Gallery 291 and Intimate Gallery, major centers of avant-garde art in the United States. Stieglitz also showed the work of Georgia O'Keeffe whom he married in 1924. Cars in a Sleet Storm was painted at the end of Dove's years in Geneva, where he had returned to manage his father's estate. Dove's own words align him with the 20th century movement away from identifiable subject matter:"I would like to make something that is real in itself, that does not remind anyone of any other thing, and that does not have to be explained like the letter A, for instance." He also commented, "… I no longer observed in the old way, and not only began to think subjectively but also to remember certain sensations purely through their form and color, that is, by certain shapes, planes of light, or character lines determined by the meeting of such planes." [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.4_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.4_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.4_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.4_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25276", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Scanned from 1999 James Via transparency", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.4_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.4_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.4_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.4_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41492", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Color-corrected and cropped from M1 file as no print master existed. JPG derived from new print master.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 352, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/352", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.5", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1860", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1860", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1860", "Disp_Title" : "Genesee Oaks", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Asher Brown Durand", "Sort_Artist" : "Durand, Asher Brown", "Disp_Dimen" : "28 1/4 x 42 in. (71.8 x 106.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "28 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "42 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Asher B. Durand was commissioned to paint this magnificent vista overlooking the Genesee River Valley in Geneseo, New York, by a member of the Wadsworth family, the village founders. At one time, they owned all the land from Geneseo to Rochester. [Gallery label text, 2007] No matter what the weather, this view across the Genesee Valley near Geneseo is as breathtaking now as it was over two hundred years ago, when landowner James S. Wadsworth commissioned Hudson River school founder Asher B. Durand to record the beauty of the landscape in a painting. In the summer of 1859, Durand traveled from New York City to the Genesee Valley to make preparatory sketches. Trained as an engraver, he recorded many of the details that he saw, but in addition, his personal belief in the immanence of the divine in the natural world motivated him to present a landscape that seems to extend infinitely. Statuesque oak trees, many of which are still standing on the land, dominate the painting. In this region, the trees were more than a decorative feature. When the Wadsworths began to sell and lease land to local farmers, they included a clause in the contract requiring that a number of trees remain after the land was cleared. This was a holdover from British husbandry; the result was a countryside that was not only beautiful but that provided sun and moisture control for humans and animals alike. Genesee Oaks was Durand's tribute to the splendor of this valley. [Gallery label text] Durand visited the Genesee country but once, sketching in the Geneseo area during late June and July of 1859. Of his trip he wrote to his son in August: "With all my troubles I believe I have learnt more about the management of colors in the painting of trees than by all my previous practice, altho' I have never produced so little in the same span of time, not having made but four studies in five weeks." During the following year, back in his studio, Durand painted Genesee Oaks, based on the sketches he had made. The painting was commissioned by James Samuel Wadsworth, a local squire, who owned the work when it was exhibited at the National Academy of Design in 1861. Seven oil studies done near Geneseo in 1859 are photographed in Durand's studio after 1878. A photograph shows three small sculptures of cows, two standing, one reclining that may have served as models for the animals in the painting. Howard S. Merritt Peters, Susan Dodge, ed. Memorial Art Gallery: An Introduction to the Collection. (Rochester, NY: The Memorial Art Gallery, 1988). p.182-3.", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Women's Council in honor of Harris K. Prior", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.5_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.5_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.5_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.5_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12463", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 356, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/356", "Disp_Access_No" : "1941.26", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1904", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1899", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1909", "Disp_Title" : "William H. Macdowell", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Thomas Eakins", "Sort_Artist" : "Eakins, Thomas", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 x 20 in. (61 x 50.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Thomas Eakins painted multiple portraits of his father-in-law, William H. Macdowell. Eakins’s sensitive portraits and genre scenes defined American realist art at the end of the 19th century. His art and commitment to realism were enormously influential to the artists of the Urban Realist movement. [Gallery label text, 2007] Thomas Eakins was one of America's greatest painters, whose realistic portrayals of people at work and at play have become icons of American culture. He immortalized many friends and family members by using them as subjects, among them his father-in-law, William Macdowell, an engraver and self-styled philosopher, whom Eakins painted and photographed numerous times. In the Gallery's portrait, Macdowell's aged face, rendered with scrupulous care and detail, emerges from a somber background. In this direct and straightforward manner, Eakins suggests Macdowell's strength of character and distinctive personality. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Originally purchased through R. T. Miller fund-- later shifted to Marion Stratton Gould fund. The reason could not be determined.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/41.26_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/41.26_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/41.26_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/41.26_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "38866", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Photographed in situ as installed; frame cropped out in Photoshop.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 12746, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/12746", "Disp_Access_No" : "2004.14", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1910", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1910", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1910", "Disp_Title" : "Windy Doorstep", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Mary Abastenia St. Leger Eberle", "Sort_Artist" : "Eberle, Mary Abastenia St. Leger", "Disp_Dimen" : "13 3/4 x 9 1/2 x 6 3/4 in. (34.9 x 24.1 x 17.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "13 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sight", "Medium" : "Bronze", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Bronze", "Info_Page_Comm" : "While [Gaston] Lachaise’s sculptures portrayed idealized subjects or specific individuals, Eberle often depicted realistic figures she saw on the streets of New York. [Gallery label text, 2005]", "Dedication" : "Maurice R. and Maxine B. Forman Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2004.14_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2004.14_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2004.14_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2004.14_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "21354", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk MAG v. 53", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3881, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3881", "Disp_Access_No" : "1999.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "after 1884", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1885", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1894", "Disp_Title" : "Bust of Ralph Waldo Emerson", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Daniel Chester French", "Sort_Artist" : "French, Daniel Chester", "Disp_Dimen" : "22 in. (55.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "22 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "maximum", "Medium" : "Bronze", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Bronze", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of the family of Alan Underberg, in his memory", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/99.2_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/99.2_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/99.2_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/99.2_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12554", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 396, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/396", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.12", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1915", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1910", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1920", "Disp_Title" : "Beach at Blue Point", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "William Glackens", "Sort_Artist" : "Glackens, William", "Disp_Dimen" : "25 1/4 x 30 1/8 in. (64.1 x 76.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "25 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "30 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Like many American painters, including Winslow Homer, William Glackens was an artist-reporter early in his career. He met Robert Henri in Philadelphia, shared a studio with him, and went to Paris with him in 1895. Upon Glackens's return, he moved to New York City. He exhibited with The Eight in 1908, and chaired the Armory Show in 1913. By 1914, he was devoting all of his time to painting, and espoused subjects like this one, colorful depictions of Americans at play. Many of his paintings reflect the influence of French impressionists, particularly Pierre Auguste Renoir. [Gallery label text, 2003]", "Dedication" : "Elizabeth R. Grauwiller Bequest", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.12_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.12_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.12_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.12_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12454", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 402, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/402", "Disp_Access_No" : "1942.19", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1942", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1942", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1942", "Disp_Title" : "Bar Scene", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Douglas Warner Gorsline", "Sort_Artist" : "Gorsline, Douglas Warner", "Disp_Dimen" : "29 1/2 x 25 1/4 in. (74.9 x 64.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "29 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "25 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Art Patrons' Purchase Award, 1942 Rochester-Finger Lakes Exhibition", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/42.19_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/42.19_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/42.19_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/42.19_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12362", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Note: Archival Master scan has several hairs on it which need to be removed. The most visible has been removed in the Access version; probably needs to be removed in the resized print inhouse version.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 958, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/958", "Disp_Access_No" : "1966.18", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1876", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1876", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1876", "Disp_Title" : "The West Wind", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Thomas Ridgeway Gould", "Sort_Artist" : "Gould, Thomas Ridgeway", "Disp_Dimen" : "70 1/2 x 23 x 33 1/4 in. (179.1 x 58.4 x 84.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "70 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "23 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Marble", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Marble", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Who was the West Wind? In Greek mythology, the West Wind was Zephyrus, one of the four wind gods. Perhaps the maker of this work, who was influenced by the mythological subjects that he saw in Italy, was describing the West Wind by showing its effect on the figure’s hair and skirt. Another interpretation suggests that the sculpture is an idealized expression of the United States’s westward expansion. It was exhibited at the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia on the occasion of the nation’s hundredth birthday in 1876. The starred belt on the waistband of the figure’s clothing could refer to the stars on the American flag. When English poet Percy Shelley wrote his Ode to the West Wind in 1820, he closed it with these immortal words: O Wind, If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind? [Gallery label text, 2004] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Isaac Gordon Estate through the Lincoln Rochester Trust Company", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "No. II under "Statuary" in Daniel Powers'' collection catalogue of 1888. ", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/66.18_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/66.18_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/66.18_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/66.18_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12432", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008.", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/powersbuilding2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/powersbuilding2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/powersbuilding2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/powersbuilding2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "17392", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Contemporary photo of the Powers Building.", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/66.18_R1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/66.18_R1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/66.18_R1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/66.18_R1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "23163", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "image derived from Seeing America tiff", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/66.18_A3.JPG", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/66.18_A3.JPG", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/66.18_A3.JPG", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/66.18_A3.JPG", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28576", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Taken at Kwanzaa Family Day, 2008", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 418, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/418", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.5", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1942", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1942", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1942", "Disp_Title" : "The Opposition", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "William Gropper", "Sort_Artist" : "Gropper, William", "Disp_Dimen" : "28 x 38 in. (71.1 x 96.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "28 in.", "Disp_Width" : "38 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Lawmakers were threatening to cut significant federal funding for the arts when political cartoonist and painter William Gropper satirized the United States Senate in The Opposition. Gropper wrote, “I have portrayed the type of representative that is opposed to progress and culture. The U.S. Senate…[has] such an influence on American life, good and bad, that it has even affected the artist and the cultural development of our country.” [Gallery label text, 2007] William Gropper was best known for his caustic commentary on the American political and social scene. He depicted realistic and identifiable subjects; The Opposition was one of a number of paintings and illustrations that came out of his 1934 assignment for the magazine Vanity Fair, to sketch legislators in action in Washington. Gropper made no bones about his distaste for politics and used his art to further his point of view: "I have portrayed the type of representative that is opposed to progress and culture. The U.S. Senate and the House of Representatives have had such an influence on American life, good and bad, that it has even affected the artist and the cultural development of our country. No matter how far removed from politics artists may be, it seems to strike home. Only recently one blasting speech of a reactionary representative resulted in not only doing away with the Section of Fine Art, but also dismissing the Graphic Division of the OWI [Office of War Information] and nullifying art reportage for the War Department." Gropper's start as a newspaper illustrator informed the creative processes of the rest of his life. His work retained his journalist's interest in issues of the day, giving it a particularly topical essence presented in a dynamic, expressionistic format. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Related_Children" : [ { "Rel_Obj_ID" : "1714", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "The Opposition" } ], "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.5_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.5_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.5_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.5_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12387", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 419, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/419", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.6", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1943", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1943", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1943", "Disp_Title" : "The Wanderer", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "George Grosz", "Sort_Artist" : "Grosz, George", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 x 40 in. (76.2 x 101.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 in.", "Disp_Width" : "40 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Ten years after fleeing Germany during Hitler’s rise to power, George Grosz painted The Wanderer in New York. As World War II raged over the ocean, Grosz created this intensely personal response to his experience as a German soldier in World War I and his 1933 emigration to the United States. [Gallery label text, 2007] Painted in the midst of World War II, The Wanderer is an expression of the artist’s recent life experience. George Grosz was an established painter in Germany who, like many others, spoke out against the totalitarian Nazi regime. For his own safety and that of his family, he relocated to the United States. The Wanderer was one of a group of so-called ‘hell pictures’; in a letter, he wrote: I work a lot…I painted a little picture – The Wanderer – myself of course…The resonance of explosion and destruction often shakes me bodily. The explosion and destruction was a reference to the war-torn European continent that he had left behind, as well as a reference to his own emotional volatility as he tried to adjust, with little success, to his new life in America, suggested in the painting by the seagrasses he knew from Long Island and Cape Cod beaches. The Wanderer was probably one of the newest paintings acquired for the Encyclopedia Britannica Collection, as the collection was formed in 1943, the same year that Grosz painted this work. Stylistically, the painting’s expression of personal and cultural angst – achieved through desolate subject matter, somber palette, and unquiet line – was very much an alternative view to the more upbeat images of wartime artists like Norman Rockwell. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.6_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.6_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.6_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.6_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12388", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 431, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/431", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.7", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1943", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1943", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1943", "Disp_Title" : "Non-Fiction", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Robert Gwathmey", "Sort_Artist" : "Gwathmey, Robert", "Disp_Dimen" : "29 x 24 in. (73.7 x 61 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "29 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In the 1940s, Robert Gwathmey focused his artist’s eye upon the lives of African-American sharecroppers in the South. Non-Fiction shows a common sight on southern farms; older children tended to the young when both parents worked all day in the fields. The barbed wire and minstrel figure symbolize the dual oppressions of segregation and racism. [Gallery label text, 2007]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.7_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.7_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.7_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.7_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12389", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 432, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/432", "Disp_Access_No" : "1965.6", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1888-1889", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1888", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1889", "Disp_Title" : "Torn-in-Transit with Woman's Photograph", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Haberle", "Sort_Artist" : "Haberle, John", "Disp_Dimen" : "14 x 12 1/8 in. (35.6 x 30.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "14 in.", "Disp_Width" : "12 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Note that 2009 G. Sill catalogue cites exhibition review from New Haven Register "ca. 1895" entitled "By Local Artists-- Cutler''s Second Exhibit-- The Labors of New Haven Professionals... in Oil and Watercolor Crayon and Poker Work, Pencil and Etching-- First Exhibit of Its Kind Here." This article could not be found in historic New Haven Register online, so bibliographic citation not added to record.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.6_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.6_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.6_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.6_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12429", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 435, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/435", "Disp_Access_No" : "1965.59", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1940", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1935", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1945", "Disp_Title" : "Waterfall, Morse Pond", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Marsden Hartley", "Sort_Artist" : "Hartley, Marsden", "Disp_Dimen" : "22 x 28 in. (55.9 x 71.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "22 in.", "Disp_Width" : "28 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "academy board", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on academy board", "Info_Page_Comm" : "With the introduction of modernism, landscapes painted by American artists become deeply personal exercises. Unlike the emphasis on panoramic vistas in the 19th century, modernist artists allow their personal connection and response to a waterfall or a tree become the main subject of their painting. This waterfall in the Maine woods would have held particular interest for Marsden Hartley, who felt a spiritual connection to Maine and its natural resources. [Gallery label text, 2007]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Fell Out of Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.59_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.59_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.59_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.59_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12428", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.59_R1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.59_R1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.59_R1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.59_R1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "16353", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Margie MacDougal, the author for the Hartley painting for the American catalog took this photograph on November 4, 2002.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 13365, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/13365", "Disp_Access_No" : "2005.33", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1837", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1837", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1837", "Disp_Title" : "Pittsford on the Erie Canal", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "George Harvey", "Sort_Artist" : "Harvey, George", "Disp_Dimen" : "17 1/2 x 23 1/2 in. (44.5 x 59.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "17 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "23 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "panel", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on panel", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This scene is thought to be in the vicinity of King’s Bend Park just outside of Pittsford Village. [Gallery label text, 2007]", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Margaret M. McDonald Memorial Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2005.33_A5.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2005.33_A5.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2005.33_A5.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2005.33_A5.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "27616", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk dated 1-16-05", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 436, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/436", "Disp_Access_No" : "1963.27", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1904", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1904", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1904", "Disp_Title" : "The Bathers", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Childe Hassam", "Sort_Artist" : "Hassam, Childe", "Disp_Dimen" : "48 3/16 x 148 1/4 in. (122.4 x 376.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "48 3/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "148 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This painting hung originally in the home of C.E.S. Wood, a Portland, Oregon lawyer, writer and art collector. Murals were a common feature of turn-of-the-20th-century interiors, as they complemented the unified design popularized by artists and designers like William Morris and Gustav Stickley. Monumental buildings like the Boston Public Library as well as cozy residential bungalows were decorated by artists who covered blank walls with colorful, imaginative, and romantic scenes like The Bathers. MAG’s painting by Impressionist painter Childe Hassam was installed as part of a larger mural in the library/studio of the Portland, Oregon, home of Charles Erskine Scott Wood. A lawyer, writer, connoisseur, and friend of Hassam, Wood was influenced by the late 19th century Arts & Crafts aesthetic that disdained the ornate and cluttered surroundings of the Victorian period and aspired to simplicity and harmonious design. Wood wrote to his friend, the artist J. Alden Weir, that Hassam “whirled in and painted me a whole wall for my studio, and they tell me it is beautiful.” [Gallery label text, 2008] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Ogden Phipps", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "There are a number of descendants of C.E.S. Wood, who commissioned this painting from Hassam. In October 2008 Marjorie Searl spoke with Nancy Robinson von Gimbut, a greatgranddaughter of C.E.S. Wood. She was born in Rochester and lived on Fonthill Road in Brighton. Her father was David Robinson, who was born in England and was in the Air Service. Her email address is nvongimbut@yahoo.com", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/63.27_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/63.27_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/63.27_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/63.27_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12414", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 441, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/441", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.21", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1862", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1862", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1862", "Disp_Title" : "Newbury Hayfield at Sunset", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Martin Johnson Heade", "Sort_Artist" : "Heade, Martin Johnson", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 1/4 x 25 3/16 in. (28.6 x 64 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "25 3/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of James T. and Jacqueline S. Adams in memory of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick M. Stemmler", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.21_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.21_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.21_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.21_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12467", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3676, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3676", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.51", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1892", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1892", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1892", "Disp_Title" : "Paddling at Dusk", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Winslow Homer", "Sort_Artist" : "Homer, Winslow", "Disp_Dimen" : "15 1/8 x 21 7/16 in. (38.4 x 54.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "15 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "21 7/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Watercolor", "Support" : "wove paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor with graphite on wove paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The remote North Woods Club in the Adirondacks was a favorite retreat for Winslow Homer. There, he painted over a hundred oils and watercolors and found congenial friends, including 22-year-old Ernest Yalden, son of members of the club and the subject of this painting. Yalden recalled Homer’s interest in capturing the play of light flashing off the blades as he paddled his own self-built, light-weight canoe. The year after Homer painted him in his canoe, Yalden graduated with a civil engineering degree and started a trade school in New York City for uneducated Jewish immigrants. He founded the Mineralogy Club of New York and trained men to be navigators during World War I. An authority on sun-dialing, he became an accomplished amateur astronomer who built an observatory in his back yard. [Label text from It Came From the Vault exhibition, 2013]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James H. Lockhart, Jr.", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.51_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.51_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.51_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.51_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12495", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 455, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/455", "Disp_Access_No" : "1941.32", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1894", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1894", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1894", "Disp_Title" : "The Artist's Studio in an Afternoon Fog", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Winslow Homer", "Sort_Artist" : "Homer, Winslow", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 x 30 1/4 in. (61 x 76.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 in.", "Disp_Width" : "30 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In the course of his long and distinguished career, Winslow Homer shifted his focus from robust descriptions of American life to studies of interaction between man and the powerful forces of nature, particularly the ocean. This evocative painting of his studio at his family’s compound on the coast of Maine in Prout’s Neck, near Portland, is considered one of Homer’s most masterful works. [Gallery label text, 2007] A foggy day on the coastal peninsula of Prout's Neck, Maine, inspired Winslow Homer to paint one of his most elegant and contemplative works. His studio and family home stand silhouetted between the darker cliffs in the foreground and the paler sky. The painting's composition balances strong diagonal and horizontal elements in the lower half with a monolithic sky punctuated by a circle of sun. Homer was known for his many paintings of rural America, as well as his illustrations of the Civil War. In 1883, Homer left New York City, where he had been living, and settled permanently in Prout's Neck. During his years there, he produced some of the most thrilling marine paintings in the history of American art. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "R. T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "In 1991 a NYC composer named Dana Paul Perna, visited the Gallery and was so inspired by this work that he composed "Prout''s Neck" a work for piano/harp/percussion and strings. ", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/41.32_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/41.32_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/41.32_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/41.32_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "12358", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/41.32_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/41.32_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/41.32_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/41.32_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "53274", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Re-derived from original master because derivative images determined to be too warm.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 614, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/614", "Disp_Access_No" : "1978.189", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1835-1836", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1835", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1836", "Disp_Title" : "Pierrepont Edward Lacey (1832 - after 1860) and His Dog, Gun", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Milton W. Hopkins", "Sort_Artist" : "Hopkins, Milton W.", "Disp_Dimen" : "42 x 30 1/8 in. (106.7 x 76.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "42 in.", "Disp_Width" : "30 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Lacey family lived and farmed in Scottsville, New York, a small village south of Rochester on the Oatka Creek. Like many families of means, they used the services of a local artist to have their likenesses painted, since photography as we know it did not exist. For many years, this artist was thought to be Noah North, but recent scholarship points to Milton Hopkins, with whom North probably apprenticed. Painting was not Hopkins' sole occupation. As well, he farmed and was a carriage and sign painter, and was involved in anti-Masonic, abolitionist, and temperance politics. Pierrepont Lacey was born in 1832, and like many little boys, he probably was not comfortable posing for a painting in his best clothes. The family dog, Gun, most likely didn't stand still for long, either, so it may have been quite a challenge for the artist to capture the likenesses of boy and dog. When Pierrepont was fifteen, his family moved to Marshall, Michigan. He grew up, married, and was the father of one son. Milton Hopkins moved to Ohio shortly after this portrait was painted, where he continued to paint portraits and work for the Underground Railroad. [Gallery label text, 2000] Like many young boys, Pierrepont Lacey was probably not comfortable posing for a painting dressed in his best suit and red shoes. Gun, the family dog, was most likely a restless subject for the artist to capture, as well. There are six known portraits by Hopkins showing children dressed in their finest clothes, often accompanied by their dogs. All of the children’s parents were connected to the artist through their activities in anti-Masonic, abolitionist, and temperance politics. MAG’s nearly full-size portrait is one of the most engaging likenesses done by Hopkins and has become an American folk art icon. [Excerpted from gallery label text, Oct. 2011, Colleen Piccone, Curatorial] The Lacey family, whose portraits are on view nearby, lived in this home at 9 Scottsville-Chili Road in Scottsville, New York in the 1830s, where it is believed their portraits were painted and first hung. Two children in this 1890s photograph were relatives of the Lacey family. The girl on the far left was Ruth Hanford (Munn), in whose memory the portraits were given to the Memorial Art Gallery. The paintings were passed down through the generations in this family home until 1932, when they were presented on the occasion of a marriage and moved to a new home in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In 1978, the generous owners donated the group of family heirlooms to the Memorial Art Gallery, to be enjoyed by its many visitors. [Excerpted from gallery text panel, Oct. 2011, Colleen Piccone, Curatorial}] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Dunn in memory of Ruth Hanford Munn and James Buell Munn", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Related_Sibling" : [ { "Rel_Obj_ID" : "612", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Ann Gennett Pixley Lacey (1809 - 1841)" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "613", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Eliza Pixley Lacey (1834 - 1839)" } ], "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/78.189_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/78.189_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/78.189_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/78.189_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12478", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/78.187-191_R1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/78.187-191_R1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/78.187-191_R1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/78.187-191_R1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "18242", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Also on CD, the 2 images from which the restored image was created: Lacey House Scottsville A.tif (78.187-191_R2.tif on print master folder), and Lacey House Scottsville B.tif (78.187-191_R3.tif).", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 483, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/483", "Disp_Access_No" : "1936.61", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1892-1893", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1892", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1893", "Disp_Title" : "Early Moonrise in Florida", "Alt_Title" : "July Moonrise in Florida (Eastman Catalog)", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "George Inness", "Sort_Artist" : "Inness, George", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 3/8 x 36 1/4 in. (61.9 x 92.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "36 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "For George Inness, an adherent of the mystical Swedenborgian faith, landscape elements and colors had specific symbolic qualities. For example, he wrote that the moon is a ‘natural emblem of faith,’ reassuring the faithful that divine light still exists even though it is not directly visible in the night sky. In Inness’s philosophical system, blue is the color of faith. [Gallery label text, 2007]", "Dedication" : "George Eastman Collection of the University of Rochester", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/36.61_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/36.61_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/36.61_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/36.61_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12351", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/36.61_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/36.61_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/36.61_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/36.61_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41491", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "36.61_M1 color-corrected and cropped to create new Print Master as none existed. JPG derived from that Print Master", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 499, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/499", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.29", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1860", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1855", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1865", "Disp_Title" : "A Showery Day, Lake George", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Frederick Kensett", "Sort_Artist" : "Kensett, John Frederick", "Disp_Dimen" : "14 1/8 x 24 1/8 in. (35.9 x 61.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "14 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.29_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.29_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.29_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.29_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12461", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 507, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/507", "Disp_Access_No" : "1965.12", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1963", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1963", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1963", "Disp_Title" : "Interlude", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Koch", "Sort_Artist" : "Koch, John", "Disp_Dimen" : "50 1/8 x 39 7/8 in. (127.3 x 101.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "50 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "39 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "John Koch was a master of the tradition of American realism. His warm, intimate, and elegant New York City interiors glow with light that is reflected by well-polished furniture, floors, and silver. In this painting, the artist’s wife (piano teacher Dora Zaslavsky) offers a cup of tea to the nude artist’s model, while the artist sits in the background and contemplates his canvas. A variation on the theme of artists and models, Interlude also is an expression of the generosity of human relationships. As one of Zaslavsky’s former students wrote, “…her philosophy of care and concern for the individual student helps shape my teaching to this day.” [Summer 2015]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Hawks", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Related_Children" : [ { "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3173", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Study for "Interlude" (I)" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3174", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Study for "Interlude" (II)" } ], "Curator" : "Per MSearl, telephone number of family that lives in John Koch''s apartment is 212 873 2875. Family of UR student Joyce Cohen lives there (don''t know when this info is from - sometime before 2012). 11.14.12.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.12_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.12_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.12_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.12_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12425", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 980, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/980", "Disp_Access_No" : "1964.28", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1927", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1927", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1927", "Disp_Title" : "Fountain Figure", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Gaston Lachaise", "Sort_Artist" : "Lachaise, Gaston", "Disp_Dimen" : "72 in. (182.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "72 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Limestone", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Limestone", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Charlotte Whitney Allen and her husband hired Pittsford native Fletcher Steele to design a garden for their newly built house on Oliver Street [Rochester, NY] in 1915. The lot was small, ninety by two hundred feet, so Steele had to make use of interesting details to provide visual stimulation. The young landscape architect had strong notions of what would make a small backyard into a charming city oasis, which he enumerated in several articles and even a book, "Design in the Little Garden". Sculpture was one such detail Steele felt was crucial to a small garden, providing it met the proper criteria. He also considered space composition a necessary factor in good garden design. Some of the traits good garden sculpture should possess, according to Steele, include substantial mass, interesting silhouette, strong light and shadow, and contrasting material and color to the foliage around it. Mr. and Mrs. Allen commissioned the French-born sculptor Gaston Lachaise in 1926 to create a figure for the focal point of their garden. They had first seen his work in an exhibition in New York City in 1918, from which they may have purchased a small sculpture, and possibly even earlier in the 1913 Armory Show. A group of letters housed at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio chronicles the development of their occasionally stormy relationship. After considerable delay, the sculpture was finally installed above the pool in the Oliver Street garden. Alfred Stieglitz, who championed Lachaise, wrote to the Allens in 1927 that "It [the sculpture] has been seen by at least thirty sculptors and their unanimous opinion has been that it is one of the grand bits of work that has come out of America." (Kenyon College Special Collections, Gambier, Ohio, March 26, 1927) [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Charlotte Whitney Allen", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Related_Children" : [ { "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3184", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Sketch for "Fountain Figure"" } ], "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/64.28_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/64.28_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/64.28_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/64.28_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12420", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/64.28_R1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/64.28_R1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/64.28_R1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/64.28_R1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "18655", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/64.28_R2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/64.28_R2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/64.28_R2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/64.28_R2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "18656", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/64.28_R3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/64.28_R3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/64.28_R3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/64.28_R3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "33491", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "In situ view in Charlotte Whitney Allen''s garden...Photo in Object file.", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/64.28_R4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/64.28_R4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/64.28_R4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/64.28_R4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "33492", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "In situ view in Charlotte Whitney Allen''s garden...Photo in Object file.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 522, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/522", "Disp_Access_No" : "1991.5", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1948", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1948", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1948", "Disp_Title" : "Summer Street Scene in Harlem", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Jacob Lawrence", "Sort_Artist" : "Lawrence, Jacob", "Disp_Dimen" : "20 1/16 x 24 1/8 in. (51 x 61.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "20 1/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Tempera", "Support" : "panel", "Disp_Medium" : "Tempera on gesso panel", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Jacob Lawrence chronicled the migration of African Americans from the South to the North in the first half of the 20th century. In Summer Street Scene in Harlem, Lawrence’s style incorporates the flattened surfaces, distorted shapes, and bold colors of modernism to capture the energy and vitality of life in Harlem, New York. [Gallery label text, 2007]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/91.5_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/91.5_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/91.5_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/91.5_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12514", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008. Needs curatorial approval for other uses.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 523, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/523", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.36", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1914", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1914", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1914", "Disp_Title" : "The Garden", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Ernest Lawson", "Sort_Artist" : "Lawson, Ernest", "Disp_Dimen" : "20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "20 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "While many early twentieth century American paintings celebrated buildings, bridges and the hustle and bustle of the city, tranquil subjects, including Ashcan artist Ernest Lawson’s Garden, filled canvases as well. In documenting a formal garden owned by H.H. Rogers in exclusive Tuxedo Park, New York, Lawson chose rich and vivid colors that evoked the warmth and languor of a summer interlude. The view of the charming teahouse, complete with sculpture, suggests afternoons filled with genteel conversation and desultory reading, or spent drifting off to the sound of lapping water, far removed from the clamor of Lie’s nearby Brooklyn Bridge or Sloan’s Election Night. [Gallery label text, 2007] Ernest Lawson moved to New York in 1898, and in 1908 he exhibited at Macbeth Gallery with The Eight. While this garden vista is an uncharacteristically intimate view by Lawson, it demonstrates his intense use of a color palette that was referred to as consisting of "crushed jewels." The painting was exhibited in 1916 at the Memorial Art Gallery, acquired from the exhibition by longtime MAG patrons, the Watsons, and generously donated to the Gallery in 1951. Long thought to be a Rochester garden, the subject was definitively identified by Deirdre Cunningham, the George Eastman House Nancy R. Turner landscape curator, as a garden in Tuxedo Park, New York. The current owners are in the process of restoring the garden, abandoned for many years, to its original beauty. [Gallery label text, 2003] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Estate of Emily and James Sibley Watson", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.36_R1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.36_R1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.36_R1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.36_R1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20130", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "From Architectural Forum article", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.36_R2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.36_R2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.36_R2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.36_R2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20131", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.36_R3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.36_R3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.36_R3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.36_R3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20132", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Contemporary view of H. H. Rogers garden", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.36_R4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.36_R4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.36_R4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.36_R4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "36872", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "From Architectural Forum article", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.36_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.36_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.36_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.36_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "44279", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 534, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/534", "Disp_Access_No" : "1913.6", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1911-1912", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1911", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1912", "Disp_Title" : "Morning on the River", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Jonas Lie", "Sort_Artist" : "Lie, Jonas", "Disp_Dimen" : "50 x 60 in. (127 x 152.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "50 in.", "Disp_Width" : "60 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Jonas Lie captures the new American landscape of industry and technology by painting the gritty underside of the Brooklyn Bridge. [Gallery label text, 2007]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Ruth Sibley Gade in memory of James G. Averell", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/13.6_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/13.6_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/13.6_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/13.6_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12334", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008. Needs curatorial approval for other uses.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 538, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/538", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.103", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1923-1924", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1923", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1924", "Disp_Title" : "Boy with Dice", "Alt_Title" : "Shoeshine Boy", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "George Luks", "Sort_Artist" : "Luks, George", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 5/16 x 26 5/16 in. (77 x 66.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 5/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "26 5/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This painting of a shoeshine boy is a part of a series Luks made of young boys who worked on the streets of New York. [Gallery label text, 2007 Luks, like Glackens, was originally from Philadelphia and moved to New York City in 1896. He was one of The Eight who exhibited together at Macbeth Gallery in 1908, and his painting of a boy with dice reflects his interest in depicting aspects of life in the lower classes. Here, a boy who looks to be no more than ten is smoking, more than likely earning his own living as a shoeshine boy, and supplementing his income by gambling. The painting, inscribed To Elizabeth, was given by the artist to his student, Elizabeth Olds, who studied with him at the Art Students League in New York City. Elizabeth Olds was an accomplished printmaker and, like her teacher, believed in the importance of art for all people, not just the upper classes. [Gallery label text, 2003]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Hawks, in honor of Harris K. Prior", "Copyright_Type" : "See Notes & Histories-Copyright Notes", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.103_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.103_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.103_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.103_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12459", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008. Needs curatorial approval for other uses.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1001, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1001", "Disp_Access_No" : "1986.4", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1890", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1890", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1890", "Disp_Title" : "Nathan Hale (1755 - 1776)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Frederick W. MacMonnies", "Sort_Artist" : "MacMonnies, Frederick W.", "Disp_Dimen" : "28 3/8 x 9 1/2 x 5 13/16 in. (72.1 x 24.1 x 14.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "28 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Bronze", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Bronze", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In the final decades of the nineteenth century, representations of the American Revolution and its heroes were romanticized. Here, Frederick MacMonnies depicts doomed patriot Nathan Hale (1755 – 1776) moments before his execution by the British as punishment for spying. Hale’s ruffled shirt hangs dramatically open, framing and exposing his bare chest and neck, soon to hold the hangman’s noose. With his arms tied back at the elbow, Hale’s hands are left free to gesture as he uttered his famous last words, “I regret that I have but one life to give for my country.” [Gallery label text, 2010]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/86.4_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/86.4_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/86.4_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/86.4_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12503", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3717, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3717", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.10", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1931", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1931", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1931", "Disp_Title" : "Marin Island, Small Point, Maine", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Marin", "Sort_Artist" : "Marin, John", "Disp_Dimen" : "17 x 21 3/4 in. (43.2 x 55.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "17 in.", "Disp_Width" : "21 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Watercolor", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor with graphite on paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Like Arthur G. Dove and Georgia O'Keeffe, John Marin aligned himself with the avant-garde circle surrounding Alfred Stieglitz. While Marin's favorite subjects were landscapes and seascapes, particularly Maine marines, he applied to them the modernist sensibilities that he absorbed from European masters like Cézanne, whose first one-man show was at Stieglitz's Gallery 291 in 1911. The island that Marin depicts here is one that he purchased in 1914 immediately after getting married. It is off the coast of Maine, near Portland. The Maine landscape drew Marin back throughout his life. A chief characteristic of twentieth century painting has been the practice of artists to transform subject with emotion, or as Marin's fellow painter Arthur Dove describes it, to pull the subject matter out and leave the sensation. Here, Marin sketches in the bare bones of his island but then folds it in as part of an all-over expression of action and energy, as if to suggest that the land mass is one with the wind and the waves. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.10_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.10_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.10_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.10_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12376", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 553, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/553", "Disp_Access_No" : "1945.70", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1938", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1938", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1938", "Disp_Title" : "Ice Cream Cones", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Reginald Marsh", "Sort_Artist" : "Marsh, Reginald", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 x 30 in. (61 x 76.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 in.", "Disp_Width" : "30 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Egg tempera", "Support" : "board", "Disp_Medium" : "Egg tempera on composition board", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of a Friend of the Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/45.70_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/45.70_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/45.70_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/45.70_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12370", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print master derived 11/23/09 by Lu Harper for Seeing America lesson plans. Needs to be okayed by Curatorial for any other use.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 552, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/552", "Disp_Access_No" : "1943.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1938", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1938", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1938", "Disp_Title" : "People's Follies No. 3", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Reginald Marsh", "Sort_Artist" : "Marsh, Reginald", "Disp_Dimen" : "25 7/8 x 39 in. (65.7 x 99.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "25 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "39 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Tempera", "Support" : "board", "Disp_Medium" : "Tempera on composition board", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Reginald Marsh inherited the Urban Realist interest in the act of seeing and being seen. His art often addressed sexuality in the urban environment, as in this painting of a burlesque hall. [Gallery label text, 2007]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/43.1_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/43.1_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/43.1_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/43.1_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12364", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3891, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3891", "Disp_Access_No" : "1998.74", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1907", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1907", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1907", "Disp_Title" : "Sunday Morning", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Jerome Myers", "Sort_Artist" : "Myers, Jerome", "Disp_Dimen" : "37 1/2 x 44 1/2 in. (95.3 x 113 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "37 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "44 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "with frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Jerome Myers said of his art, “I went to the gutter for my subject, but they were poetic gutters.” [Gallery label text, 2007] Jerome Myers was called "the gentle poet of the slums" for his compassionate images of immigrant life in New York's Lower East Side. Myers recorded the unglamorous, yet commonplace aspects of city life, as did fellow painters John Sloan and Robert Henri, members of The Eight or the Ashcan School. However, his vision of the city's poor never evoked a sense of wretchedness: "Why catch humanity by the shirt-tail," he said, "when I could see more pleasant things?" Though tame to us today, paintings like Sunday Morning were considered progressive, even "revolutionary" when they were painted, because of their subject matter. However, when it came to exhibiting with The Eight, Robert Henri didn't think that Myers's work was forceful enough. As a founder of the innovative American Association of Painters and Sculptors in 1911, Myers helped to pave the way for the watershed 1913 Armory Show in New York City, the exhibition that introduced European modernism to an enthusiastic but occasionally bewildered public. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/98.74_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/98.74_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/98.74_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/98.74_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12547", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008. Needs curatorial approval for other uses.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 617, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/617", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.11a", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1931", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1931", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1931", "Disp_Title" : "Jawbone and Fungus", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Georgia O'Keeffe", "Sort_Artist" : "O'Keeffe, Georgia", "Disp_Dimen" : "17 x 20 in. (43.2 x 50.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "17 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "With her unique vision and expression, Georgia O’Keeffe epitomizes the modern American artist. Her simple, pared down shapes and closely cropped still-lifes of bones and flowers turn objects into landscapes of their own. [Gallery label text, 2007] Painting on the verso, 51.11b.", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Related_Sibling" : [ { "Rel_Obj_ID" : "11221", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Untitled (Abstraction)" } ], "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.11a_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.11a_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.11a_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.11a_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12378", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008. Needs curatorial approval for other uses.", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.11b_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.11b_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.11b_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.11b_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "12379", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1034, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1034", "Disp_Access_No" : "1913.12", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1914", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1914", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1914", "Disp_Title" : "Memory", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "William Ordway Partridge", "Sort_Artist" : "Partridge, William Ordway", "Disp_Dimen" : "82 1/2 x 26 3/4 x 29 5/8 in. (209.6 x 67.9 x 75.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "82 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "26 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Marble", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Marble", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. James Sibley Watson", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/13.12_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/13.12_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/13.12_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/13.12_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12333", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/13.12_R3.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/13.12_R3.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/13.12_R3.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/13.12_R3.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "40466", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "color from original photo in photo files in Archives.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 628, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/628", "Disp_Access_No" : "1964.40", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1857-1858", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1857", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1858", "Disp_Title" : "Still Life Number 26: Silver Basket of Fruit", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Rubens Peale", "Sort_Artist" : "Peale, Rubens", "Disp_Dimen" : "13 7/8 x 20 in. (35.2 x 50.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "13 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "tin", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on tin", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In March, 1856, Rubens Peale wrote: “I painted all day on Number 15 and Number 26 as it has been very stormy today, nothing going on out doors…. After this, however, visitors came to stay and part of the house was given over to them.” What is somewhat surprising is that Peale, a member of the illustrious family of artists and naturalists, did not begin painting until he was seventy-one. Until then, his work had focused on museums and farming. Considering the artist’s limited visual acuity, the texture and color of the fruit and basket in this quiet still life are all the more remarkable. [Gallery label text, 2005] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Helen C. Ellwanger", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/64.40_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/64.40_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/64.40_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/64.40_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12422", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3892, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3892", "Disp_Access_No" : "1998.36", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1946", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1941", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1951", "Disp_Title" : "Jane", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Guy Pène du Bois", "Sort_Artist" : "Pène du Bois, Guy", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 x 24 in. (76.2 x 61 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Critic and painter Guy Pène du Bois continued the Realist, urban tradition of the Ash Can School painters, but peopled his canvases with more urbane elegant, and at times, mysterious, figures. Jane is one of his quintessential creations. An enigmatic figure appears to step out of a shadow, perhaps in a restaurant or nightclub, perhaps inside or outside, in America or abroad. She is fashionably thin, well-dressed, and bejeweled, and yet for all her apparent material comfort, she manifests a sense of isolation and anxiety, expressed by her hands, her cast down eyes, and a downward turn of the mouth. Pène du Bois' intriguing contrasts of light and dark areas within the painting contribute to the sense of unease that the figure expresses. The painting's mood certainly reflects the artist's admiration of Edward Hopper. [Gallery label text, 2003]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Thomas H. and Marion J. Hawks, by exchange", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/98.36_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/98.36_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/98.36_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/98.36_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12540", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 635, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/635", "Disp_Access_No" : "1965.3", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "after 1890", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1891", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1900", "Disp_Title" : "Articles Hung on a Door", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Frederick Peto", "Sort_Artist" : "Peto, John Frederick", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 x 21 3/4 in. (76.2 x 55.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 in.", "Disp_Width" : "21 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.3_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.3_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.3_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.3_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12427", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 633, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/633", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.22", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1834", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1829", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1839", "Disp_Title" : "Old Woman with a Bible", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Ammi Phillips", "Sort_Artist" : "Phillips, Ammi", "Disp_Dimen" : "33 1/2 x 28 in. (85.1 x 71.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "33 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "28 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "linen", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on linen", "Info_Page_Comm" : "We take for granted the ability to record our families' faces. Even the likenesses of those long-dead are etched in our memories by their photographs. But before cameras and film, the only way to save a "likeness" was to create a life or death mask, draw or paint a picture, or make a sculpture. In rural New York State, many portraits were done by painters like Ammi Phillips who had a minimal amount of training. Their customers, in turn, passed paintings down through the generations until all too often, the identity of the sitters was lost. If we don't know whose portrait this was, and if Ammi Phillips was not an academically trained artist, why do we continue to appreciate this work and keep it in a museum? The directness of human spirit that these paintings convey combined with the intricacy of design and patterning create a work filled with the "visual delight" that we search for in a work of art. [Gallery label text, 2008] This woman’s identity has not been preserved, but we might speculate with confidence that she was a devout person, as her arm is placed so firmly on the Bible. Notice, too, how carefully the artist painted the fabric of her day-cap, the embroidery on her shawl, and even the tasseled trim of the curtains. [Gallery label text, 2008]", "Dedication" : "Beatrice M. Padelford Trust", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.22_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.22_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.22_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.22_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12492", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 637, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/637", "Disp_Access_No" : "1986.132", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1973", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1973", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1973", "Disp_Title" : "The Beginning of the Fields", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Fairfield Porter", "Sort_Artist" : "Porter, Fairfield", "Disp_Dimen" : "52 x 76 1/8 in. (132.1 x 193.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "52 in.", "Disp_Width" : "76 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/86.132_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/86.132_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/86.132_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/86.132_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12499", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7943, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7943", "Disp_Access_No" : "2001.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1839", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1834", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1844", "Disp_Title" : "Portrait of a Dark-haired Man Reading the "Genesee Farmer"", "Alt_Title" : "possible portrait of Luther Tucker, editor of the "Genesee Farmer"", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Asahel Lynde Powers", "Sort_Artist" : "Powers, Asahel Lynde", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 x 25 in. (76.2 x 63.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 in.", "Disp_Width" : "25 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Until the invention of photography, portraits were the primary means of recording human likeness. Asahel Powers, like many self-taught artists, traveled the countryside in search of portrait commissions. Many of these paintings were passed down through families. Over time, however, the names of the sitters were often lost. The Genesee Farmer, first published in western New York in January 1831, was written and edited by Luther Tucker. The newspaper was a well-known local and international resource for farmers. Given the newspaper’s stature, the “dark-haired” man of this portrait could be one of the newspaper’s owners or editors, perhaps even Luther Tucker himself. [Forman Gallery, Summer 2015]", "Dedication" : "Virginia Jeffrey Smith Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2001.1_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2001.1_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2001.1_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2001.1_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "17131", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2001.1_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2001.1_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2001.1_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2001.1_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20140", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2001.1_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2001.1_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2001.1_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2001.1_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20141", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2001.1_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2001.1_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2001.1_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2001.1_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20142", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2001.1_A5.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2001.1_A5.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2001.1_A5.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2001.1_A5.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20143", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3735, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3735", "Disp_Access_No" : "1963.28", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1922", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1922", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1922", "Disp_Title" : "Park by the Sea", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Maurice Prendergast", "Sort_Artist" : "Prendergast, Maurice", "Disp_Dimen" : "17 3/8 x 22 3/8 in. (44.1 x 56.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "17 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "22 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Watercolor", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor with graphite on paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Throughout his life, Maurice Prendergast found delight and inspiration in the pleasant, sun-filled parks and beaches along the New England shore. He recalled happy moments there in brilliant watercolors, so remarkable in their energy and hue that they were likened, in Prendergast's day, to "an explosion in a color factory." Trained as a theater poster painter, Prendergast became extraordinarily facile in watercolor, and he employed it throughout his career. The fluid medium was especially appropriate to Prendergast's expressions of the momentary, as the dance of light across the landscape and the rhythmic movements of bathers and picnickers could be suggested in quick dashes of luminous color. Under the influence of French post-impressionistic painting, Prendergast's watercolors became increasingly abstract. This late example is typical in its brevity. The design is realized through a loose pattern of strong primary and secondary colors set against the bright white ground. Much of the sheet has been left to create scattered highlights and to heighten the viewer's awareness of the work as pure paint on paper. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Charles Prendergast", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/63.28_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/63.28_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/63.28_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/63.28_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "13424", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2255, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2255", "Disp_Access_No" : "1919.29", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1895-1897", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1895", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1897", "Disp_Title" : "The Ships", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Maurice Prendergast", "Sort_Artist" : "Prendergast, Maurice", "Disp_Dimen" : "15 3/8 x 10 15/16 in. (39.1 x 27.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "15 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "10 15/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "Japanese paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Monotype", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Emily Sibley Watson", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/19.29_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/19.29_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/19.29_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/19.29_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12338", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/19.29_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/19.29_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/19.29_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/19.29_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41490", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Corrected and cropped from 19.29_M1.tif as no print master existed. JPG derived from new print master.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 640, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/640", "Disp_Access_No" : "1963.29", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1913-1915", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1913", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1915", "Disp_Title" : "Woodland Bathers", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Maurice Prendergast", "Sort_Artist" : "Prendergast, Maurice", "Disp_Dimen" : "19 1/2 x 26 1/2 in. (49.5 x 67.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "19 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "26 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas mounted on board", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Despite many differences in style and subject matter, Maurice Prendergast exhibited with the Urban Realist artists in the beginning of the century. His style of breaking up the surface of his paintings with color and light was a shock to American viewers. An art critic wrote in 1908, “Hung in a group, these canvases of Mr. Prendergast look… like an explosion in a color factory.” [Gallery label text, 2007] Prendergast looked to European artists for his inspiration. One of the most modern painters working in America in the first decade of the century, his colors were often applied in post-impressionist daubs, like Seurat, and the space in his works was compressed and unrealistic. Like Glackens, he enjoyed painting scenes of leisure, particularly bathing scenes like this one. He exhibited in the 1908 Macbeth Gallery show, along with Henri and the others, and while his work had little in common with many of the members of The Eight, he was as interested as they were in defying the conventions that had been established by the National Academy. [Gallery label text, 2003]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/63.29_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/63.29_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/63.29_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/63.29_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12415", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1042, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1042", "Disp_Access_No" : "1955.3", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1895", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1895", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1895", "Disp_Title" : "The Broncho Buster", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Frederic Remington", "Sort_Artist" : "Remington, Frederic", "Disp_Dimen" : "22 1/2 x 20 in. (57.2 x 50.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "22 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Bronze", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Bronze", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of a Friend of the Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/55.3_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/55.3_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/55.3_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/55.3_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12398", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 12015, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/12015", "Disp_Access_No" : "2003.104", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1901", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1901", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1901", "Disp_Title" : "The Cheyenne", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Frederic Remington", "Sort_Artist" : "Remington, Frederic", "Disp_Dimen" : "19 3/4 x 23 x 7 1/2 in. (50.2 x 58.4 x 19.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "19 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "23 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Bronze", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Bronze", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Bequest of Mrs. Merritt Cleveland", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2003.104_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2003.104_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2003.104_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2003.104_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "23170", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "derived from Seeing America tif", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 664, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/664", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.98", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1944", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1944", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1944", "Disp_Title" : "Soldier on Leave", "Alt_Title" : "Little Girl Observing Lovers on a Train", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Norman Rockwell", "Sort_Artist" : "Rockwell, Norman", "Disp_Dimen" : "22 x 20 in. (55.9 x 50.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "22 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "During World War II, Norman Rockwell painted positive and uplifting scenes of the American homefront. Rockwell, America’s most popular illustrator, created "Soldier on Leave" for the [August 12, 1944] cover of the widely-read magazine, 'The Saturday Evening Post.' [Gallery label text, 2007] Norman Rockwell’s Saturday Evening Post covers have shaped much of the American public’s imagination about what is American about America. This painting appeared on the magazine’s cover on August 12, 1944, in the midst of World War II. Allied Forces had landed on the beaches of France on D-Day, June 6, two months prior to the magazine’s publication date, and there was reason to believe that the war would not go on much longer. In the meantime, soldiers were continuing to be drafted and wartime romances were intensified by the threat of separation. The scene in Soldier on Leave was a common story: young lovers take what comfort they can from each other in spite of their lack of privacy, knowing their time together is brief. Rockwell frequently used Vermont neighbors as models for his paintings. This painting is no exception, and to complete the realistic setting, he posed his models in an actual train that was loaned to him by the Rutland Railroad. [Gallery label text, 2004] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Robert M. Boynton", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.98_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.98_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.98_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.98_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "27605", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk dated 1-16-05", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1136, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1136", "Disp_Access_No" : "1994.51", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1894", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1894", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1894", "Disp_Title" : "Charles Cotesworth Beaman", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Augustus Saint-Gaudens", "Sort_Artist" : "Saint-Gaudens, Augustus", "Disp_Dimen" : "26 1/2 x 15 x 3/16 in. (67.3 x 38.1 x 0.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "26 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "15 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Bronze", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Bronze", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mary Ellen Gaylord", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/94.51_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/94.51_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/94.51_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/94.51_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "17121", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1137, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1137", "Disp_Access_No" : "1994.50", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1900", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1900", "Disp_Title" : "Hettie Sherman Evarts Beaman", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Augustus Saint-Gaudens", "Sort_Artist" : "Saint-Gaudens, Augustus", "Disp_Dimen" : "22 1/4 x 20 x 3/8 in. (56.5 x 50.8 x 1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "22 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Bronze", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Bronze", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mary Ellen Gaylord", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/94.50_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/94.50_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/94.50_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/94.50_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "17120", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3282, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3282", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.96", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1931", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1931", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1931", "Disp_Title" : "Ballet Mechanique", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Charles Sheeler", "Sort_Artist" : "Sheeler, Charles", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 1/2 x 10 1/4 in. (26.7 x 26 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "10 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "image", "Medium" : "Conte crayon", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Conte crayon ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1927, Charles Sheeler was commissioned to photograph Henry Ford’s River Rouge car factory outside Detroit to advertise the company’s new Model A car. Ford’s innovations in the assembly line were celebrated for their efficiency, productivity, and ability to produce low-cost consumer goods. Yet the dark underside to this progress was unbearable, dehumanizing work conditions. <em>Ballet Mechanique</em>, based on a photo from Sheeler’s Ford factory series, is a tightly-cropped scene of an industrial system of pipes and metal. By isolating the sleek machinery from actual labor, Sheeler elevates the loud, hot, dangerous factory environment to a cool, sleek, abstract vision of modernity. Sheeler’s style, Precisionism, was a celebration of the technological sublime with its crisp, pure form and industrial themes. Of American artists in the early years of the 1900s, Charles Sheeler made one of the most dramatic breaks from the traditional assumption that beauty could be found in nature alone. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Peter Iselin and his sister, Emilie Iselin Wiggin", "Copyright_Type" : "No existing copyright holder", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.96_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.96_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.96_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.96_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12464", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print master derived 11/23/09 by Lu Harper for Seeing America lesson plans.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 702, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/702", "Disp_Access_No" : "1945.45", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1900-1905", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1900", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1905", "Disp_Title" : "Sullivan Street", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Everett Shinn", "Sort_Artist" : "Shinn, Everett", "Disp_Dimen" : "8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "10 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In a city of many tough neighborhoods, New York’s Sullivan Street was one of the toughest. Shinn’s depiction of the isolated figure in the foreground evokes the condition of modern man in an urban environment—a recurring theme in the art of the Urban Realists. [Gallery label text, 2007] In 1897, encouraged by his mentor Robert Henri, Shinn moved from Philadelphia to New York City. Like Luks and Glackens, he was an artist-reporter as well as a painter. He exhibited with The Eight in 1908 at Macbeth Gallery. Sullivan Street was owned by the artist until 1945, when the Memorial Art Gallery purchased the canvas directly from him. With just a few strokes of his brush, Everett Shinn has recreated an overcast winter street scene filled with mood and mystery. Sullivan Street is in Greenwich Village, around the corner from Shinn's studio on Waverly Place and near Washington Square Park, whose leafless trees can be seen beyond the buildings on the right. [Gallery label text, 2003]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/45.45_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/45.45_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/45.45_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/45.45_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "22001", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "color corrected from Jim Via''s original transparency", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11714, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11714", "Disp_Access_No" : "2003.4", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2001", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2001", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2001", "Disp_Title" : "Untitled (the failure of Sylvester)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Lorna Simpson", "Sort_Artist" : "Simpson, Lorna", "Disp_Dimen" : "61 x 41 1/8 x 1 3/4 in. (154.9 x 104.5 x 4.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "61 in.", "Disp_Width" : "41 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "with frame", "Medium" : "Gelatin silver print", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Archival gelatin prints under Plexiglas with black vinyl lettering", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Lorna Simpson's art defies easy explanation. Inspired by diverse sources, it contains cinematic allusions, references to popular culture, as well as personal narrative. It is intentionally complex and ambiguous. Simpson's goal is to make the viewer think and reflect - about race, about class, about gender. Untitled (the failure of Sylvester) seems at first glance to be a random grouping of words and images. A closer look reveals that the photographs depict a woman whose face we never quite see - in four of the images, her face is deliberately obscured. Does this suggest that the African-American woman is not actually seen, and is invisible in American culture? What is the meaning of the text? Like the images, the texts are allusions to mainstream perceptions of the African-American. The Failure of Sylvester is the title of a painting by the Ashcan artist Robert Henri. Sylvester, a young African-American and the artist's model for the painting, has fallen asleep - has 'failed' as a model. [Gallery label text, 2004]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Photograph", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2003.4_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2003.4_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2003.4_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2003.4_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "21967", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 708, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/708", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.12", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1909", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1909", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1909", "Disp_Title" : "Chinese Restaurant", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Sloan", "Sort_Artist" : "Sloan, John", "Disp_Dimen" : "26 x 32 1/4 in. (66 x 81.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "26 in.", "Disp_Width" : "32 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "John Sloan’s interest in the working class was not only aesthetic, it was also political. By 1909, Sloan was an active member of the Socialist party and used his art to shine a light on the equally noble and interesting lives of the lower classes. Marrying style to subject, Sloan’s loose brushwork and dark colors epitomize the Ashcan style. [Gallery label text, 2007] In 1909, many artists and collectors would not have considered a Chinese restaurant to be an appropriate subject for a painting. The artist, John Sloan, was part of a group of artists labeled “Ashcan” painters early in the century, because of their frequent choice of the less genteel aspects of urban life. Now, Sloan’s paintings are recognized as major documents of American life and this painting, like many others on view in this installation, is often loaned to museums in the United States and overseas. Also called “The Eight,” Sloan and his seven colleagues exhibited together in a landmark show at Macbeth Gallery in 1908 in response to the jurying system of the National Academy and its more traditional members that frequently excluded less conventional artists. It’s amusing to consider that in 1943, when the Encyclopedia Britannica collection was being assembled, that a painting created in 1909 would be considered contemporary. However, it may have been included in recognition of the fact that John Sloan painted his contemporary world as he saw it. In fact, in 1943, the freshness of Sloan’s style and the timeless nature of the scene painted thirty-four years previously did not seem out of keeping with many works from the 1940s. And Sloan was still quite an active artist at this point in his life. [Gallery label text, 2006] As recommended by his mentor, painter Robert Henri, John Sloan derived most of his subjects from close observation of his surroundings. Such was the case on the night of February 23, 1909, when he went out to eat at a restaurant on Sixth Avenue, not far from Herald Square. He wrote, “I saw a strikingly gotten up girl with dashing red feathers in her hat playing with the restaurant's fat cat. It would be a good thing to paint. I may make a go at it.” Characteristically, Sloan waited for a bit before undertaking the work, and on March 15 wrote, “I started a memory painting of the Chinese Restaurant girl I saw some four weeks ago." His intermittent working style is revealed by a diary entry on March, 18, in which he described not only working on the painting, but going to the restaurant again to “refresh my memory of the place.” In 1944, the painting joined a corporate collection of outstanding contemporary art formed by the Encyclopedia Britannica. In 1951, the Memorial Art Gallery acquired fourteen paintings from the collection – this painting and work by Thomas Hart Benton, Georgia O'Keeffe, and Stuart Davis, among others. [Gallery label text, 2003]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.12_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.12_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.12_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.12_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "33004", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk in curatorial office", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 707, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/707", "Disp_Access_No" : "1941.33", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1907", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1907", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1907", "Disp_Title" : "Election Night", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Sloan", "Sort_Artist" : "Sloan, John", "Disp_Dimen" : "26 3/8 x 32 1/4 in. (67 x 81.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "26 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "32 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This scene, nearly unintelligible in its crowding and confusion, is Sloan’s celebration of the furor of the city on election night. [Gallery label text, 2007] John Sloan met Robert Henri in Philadelphia, and from early on maintained a friendship and correspondence with him until Henri died in 1929. He moved to New York City at Henri’s urging. On November 5, 1907, he wrote: “Election Day… saw the noisy trumpet blowers, confetti throwers and the 'ticklers' in use - a small feather duster on a stick which is pushed in the face of each girl by the men, and in the face of men by the girls. A good humorous crowd, so dense in places that it was impossible to control one's movement.” The location, Herald Square at 34th and Broadway, was close by the New York Herald Building as well as Macy's. The elevated railroad tracks loomed overhead, increasing the suggestion of noise and activity in the scene. Sloan included Election Night as one of his entries in the 1908 exhibition at Macbeth Gallery. In his estimation, it was “…one of my best things. So that I felt happy in the evening, that good all over feeling that only comes from satisfaction in work - the real happiness, the joy of accomplishing or thinking that one has accomplished, which amounts to the same thing.” [Gallery label text, 2003]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/41.33_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/41.33_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/41.33_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/41.33_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12359", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3883, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3883", "Disp_Access_No" : "1998.39", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1998", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1998", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1998", "Disp_Title" : "Famous Names", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Jaune Quick-to-See Smith", "Sort_Artist" : "Smith, Jaune Quick-to-See", "Disp_Dimen" : "80 x 50 in. (203.2 x 127 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "80 in.", "Disp_Width" : "50 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil, acrylic, collaged photographs and mixed media on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Jaune Quick-To-See Smith’s collaged paintings incorporate the desert colors of her childhood with the spontaneous brushwork of Abstract Expressionism. She has said about her work: My art, my life experience, and my tribal ties are totally enmeshed. I go from one community with messages to the other, and I try to enlighten people. Famous Names accomplishes Smith’s self-appointed task. The canvas is dominated by the image of a traditional Native American buckskin dress. The photographs and text around this central form refer to stereotypes that the dominant non-Native culture has used to describe Native Americans as simultaneously exotic and ridiculous, and to marginalize them. As Seneca artist and site manager of Ganondagan G. Peter Jemison writes in an essay on this painting, the “famous names” referenced in the title offer a composite of “a record of people with ancient ties to the land and of the often-bungled attempts of English-speaking writers to capture what a translator related.” [Summer 2015]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Thomas H. and Marion J. Hawks, by exchange", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/98.39_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/98.39_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/98.39_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/98.39_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12543", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 710, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/710", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.139", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1866", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1866", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1866", "Disp_Title" : "Home Late", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Mortimer Smith", "Sort_Artist" : "Smith, Mortimer", "Disp_Dimen" : "40 x 46 in. (101.6 x 116.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "40 in.", "Disp_Width" : "46 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Home Late is the earliest identified painting by Mortimer Smith. The shadowy interior of the frontier cabin demonstrates his mastery of the genre scene: the rifle hanging from the ceiling side by side with drying meats and vegetables, supper cooking in the kettle suspended in the stone fireplace, and the dog sleeping peacefully by the fire. Smith is equally adept at capturing the warm glow cast by the fire as it contrasts with the cold light of the winter scene beyond the doorway. The child pausing in the doorway heightens the emotional ambiguity of the scene as he surveys the cabin's interior, perhaps to gauge the mood within as he returns home late from skating. Smith's landscape and genre scenes suggest familiarity with his better-known contemporaries, like Albert Bierstadt and Eastman Johnson. Certainly, early exposure to the work exhibited at the Cosmopolitan Art Association in Sandusky provided Smith with models of painting styles that continued to influence him throughout his life. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.139_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.139_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.139_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.139_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "31885", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "cropped from CMYK file used in Seeing America Catalogue for web use", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 720, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/720", "Disp_Access_No" : "1988.6", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1852", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1847", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1857", "Disp_Title" : "Peeling Onions", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Lilly Martin Spencer", "Sort_Artist" : "Spencer, Lilly Martin", "Disp_Dimen" : "36 x 29 in. (91.4 x 73.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "36 in.", "Disp_Width" : "29 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Women's Council in celebration of the 75th anniversary of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/88.6_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/88.6_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/88.6_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/88.6_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12511", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 747, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/747", "Disp_Access_No" : "1916.9", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1895", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1905", "Disp_Title" : "The White Bridge", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Henry Twachtman", "Sort_Artist" : "Twachtman, John Henry", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 1/4 x 25 1/8 in. (76.8 x 63.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "25 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Impressionism, a radically modern style upon its inception in France in the 1860s, came late to American shores. The Impressionist artist sought to capture impressions of light, color, and shape in a spontaneous way. [Gallery label text, 2007] John Twachtman’s finest paintings were inspired by the beauty of the land on which he lived with his family. Located in Greenwich, Connecticut, the picturesque property included a portion of Horseneck Brook, across which Twachtman built an ornamental but functional footbridge. Here, his children swam in the summer and rowed their boat beneath the bridge’s arched deck. The bridge may have been inspired by similar structures in Venice, where the artist lived in the 1880s and 90s. Twachtman was one of America’s premier impressionist painters and a founding member of the Ten American Painters, a group that included Thomas Dewing and William Merritt Chase, artists whose works are also on view at MAG. The White Bridge’s bright colors, energetic brushwork, and light-filled canvas link Twachtman’s work with that of French impressionist Claude Monet. [Gallery label text, 2004]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Emily Sibley Watson", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/16.9_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/16.9_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/16.9_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/16.9_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12337", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 192, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/192", "Disp_Access_No" : "1934.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "before 1831", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1821", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1830", "Disp_Title" : "Colonel Nathaniel Rochester", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, American", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, American", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 x 25 in. (76.2 x 63.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 in.", "Disp_Width" : "25 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This formal gentleman was the founder of the city of Rochester, New York. His portrait was originally thought to have been painted by John James Audubon, but current scholarship has weighed in against that opinion. Nathaniel Rochester was an enterprising individual, which was a characteristic of many early settlers. He founded businesses and churches, and held governmental positions. He was the first president of the Rochester Athenaeum, the precursor to the Rochester Institute of Technology, and he was instrumental in the organization of Monroe County and the building of the Erie Canal. His practical and inventive bent may have led him to wear four-lens spectacles, which allowed him to read small print and see at a distance using the same pair of glasses. [Gallery label text, 2007]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Thomas J. Watson", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Conversation between Marjorie Searl and Holly Cumberland (Rochester family descendant) regarding acquisition and attribution of painting (December 7, 2009); Holly wanted to alert us to the book "Nathaniel" written by her grandfather, Rochester Rogers, whose son Nathaniel died of throat cancer in 1945. In the book, Rogers alludes to the painting of Nathaniel Rochester, and that it was acquired for MAG by Thomas Watson. Holly''s contention is that Thomas Watson bought the painting believing that it was by Audubon, and that as Rochester Rogers and Thomas Watson were friends, there would have been ample opportunity for Watson to have ascertained from his friend Rogers that it was in fact by Audubon. However, as I explained to Holly, it was Rochester Rogers'' sister Helen who strongly supported the Audubon attribution, so this comment does not change the fact that there is virtually no objective and external evidence pointing to this portrait''s being by Audubon, other than an anonymous inscription on the back of the painting.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/34.1_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/34.1_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/34.1_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/34.1_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12350", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3894, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3894", "Disp_Access_No" : "1998.37.1-2a-b", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1886", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1886", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1886", "Disp_Title" : "Life Mask and Hands of Abraham Lincoln", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Leonard Wells Volk", "Sort_Artist" : "Volk, Leonard Wells", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 3/4 x 8 1/8 x 5 5/8 in. (24.8 x 20.6 x 14.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "8 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Head", "Medium" : "Bronze", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Bronze", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Thomas H. and Marion J. Hawks, by exchange", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : ".1 - life mask .2a&b - hands", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/98.37.1-2a-b_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/98.37.1-2a-b_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/98.37.1-2a-b_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/98.37.1-2a-b_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "12541", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2455, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2455", "Disp_Access_No" : "1965.7", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1964", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1964", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1964", "Disp_Title" : "Jackie", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Andy Warhol", "Sort_Artist" : "Warhol, Andy", "Disp_Dimen" : "23 7/8 x 23 1/4 in. (60.6 x 59.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "23 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "23 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Acrylic", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Warhol often used an unorthodox approach to portraiture. He borrowed from media photographs of celebrities to construct an individual’s public image instead of using a brush to render an idiosyncratic artistic interpretation of a sitter’s appearance. This work is part of Warhol’s “Jackie” series, which he began shortly after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963. As the basis for the paintings, he first selected eight photographs from the mass-media coverage of the event. He then cropped the pictures to focus on the President’s widow, Jacqueline Kennedy. Warhol used a commercial silkscreen technique to produce multiple versions of his work. As Warhol described, I wanted something that gave more of an assembly line effect….With silkscreening you pick a photograph, blow it up, transfer it in glue onto silk, and then roll ink across it so the ink goes through the silk but not through the glue. That way you get the same image, slightly different each time. It was all so simple quick and chancy. [Forman Gallery, Summer 2015]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.7_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.7_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.7_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.7_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12431", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 768, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/768", "Disp_Access_No" : "1925.33", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1922", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1922", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1922", "Disp_Title" : "Three Trees, Winter", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Harold Weston", "Sort_Artist" : "Weston, Harold", "Disp_Dimen" : "16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1922, the year he painted "Three Trees, Winter," Harold Weston wrote: "I stopped beside a big hemlock tree and reached around the great trunk to feel its vigor, its reality, its life existing essence. My ear, laid against the wet bark, seemed to hear the pulse, the flow of life-creating sap....[R]oots plunged into the soil, made it one with the earth and gave it life. As a primitive pagan I bowed before the mystery of that world spirit that giveth life to nature and to man." Weston has recently emerged as one of the premier painters of the Adirondack landscape. His modernist sensibility - abstract forms, expressive lines and colors - renew the viewer's understanding and appreciation of traditional vistas. In the words of collector Duncan Phillips, "There is a young American painter who stirs in me the hope for a re-birth on this new soil of something that was not lost to the art of painting with the passing of Vincent van Gogh." [Gallery label text, 2007] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Emily Sibley Watson", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/25.33_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/25.33_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/25.33_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/25.33_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12345", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3893, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3893", "Disp_Access_No" : "1998.38", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1926", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1921", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1931", "Disp_Title" : "Right to the Jaw", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Mahonri Young", "Sort_Artist" : "Young, Mahonri", "Disp_Dimen" : "14 x 21 x 10 in. (35.6 x 53.3 x 25.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "14 in.", "Disp_Width" : "21 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Bronze", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Bronze", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Many of the subjects of Mahonri Young's bronze sculptures were drawn from the working class—dock workers, riveters, and farmers. Among his most successful small sculptures were energetic scenes of boxers in action, whose movements embodied strength and power. Like his Ash Can School colleagues, he extolled the activities of everyday life. Young came to New York from Salt Lake City, Utah, where his grandfather, Brigham Young, established America's permanent Mormon community after their forced exodus from Nauvoo, Illinois. Young studied at the Art Students League, and became a teacher there as well. [Gallery label text, 2003]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Thomas H. and Marion J. Hawks, by exchange", "Copyright_Type" : "Copyright Assigned to MAG", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/98.38_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/98.38_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/98.38_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/98.38_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "36944", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/98.38_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/98.38_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/98.38_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/98.38_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "36945", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }