{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 4889, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4889", "Disp_Access_No" : "1964.111", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "mid 19th century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1833", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1866", "Disp_Title" : "Raven Dance Mask", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Kwakwaka'wakw", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Kwakwaka'wakw", "Disp_Dimen" : "56 in. (142.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "56 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood, pigment", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment, cedar bark", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This mask represents Raven, one of the creatures most important to the Kwakwaka’wakw people. Known to be quick learners, aggressive defenders of territory, and very social with one another, ravens have been a respected clan emblem for centuries. Raven masks are worn during a portion of the hamatsa, an initiation masquerade for young men. Following a choreographed sequence, with beaks projecting upward and masks moving wildly from side to side, the hinged lower jaw of the mask is manipulated with a cord. When the cord is pulled, the mask responds with a loud clacking sound – the “hap, hap” of the birds’ voices – adding to the dramatic effect of the performance. Hamatsa is performed at Kwakwaka’wakw potlatches. Potlatches are traditional cross-clan celebrations including dancing, feasting and magnanimous distribution of gifts held to honor births, marriages, deaths and other changes in social relationships. Potlatches continue to this day, despite attempts to ban them by both the Canadian and United States governments in the late 19th century. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Native Canadian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/64.111_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/64.111_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/64.111_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/64.111_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "19265", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2818, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2818", "Disp_Access_No" : "1922.5", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Shaman Medicine Charm", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Tlingit", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Tlingit", "Disp_Dimen" : "6 1/4 x 2 1/4 in. (15.9 x 5.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "6 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Walrus ivory", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Walrus ivory", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The belief that humans can draw power from the non-human world is a framework that underlies many belief systems, and is especially strong in most Native North American culture groups. Shamans played an especially important role in this respect. Responsible for curing the sick, controlling the weather, guaranteeing successful fish runs, combating witches, and providing assistance during battle, shamans moved freely between the human and spirit world. Tlingit shamans often carried charms like this one. Each charm is unique and often includes a multiplicity of figures. This charm is in the form of a whale, with the rear assuming the form of a land otter, a highly powerful spirit helper to the shaman. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Henry A. Strong", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.5_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.5_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.5_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.5_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "15069", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.5_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.5_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.5_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.5_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25805", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7905, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7905", "Disp_Access_No" : "1953.62", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Comb", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Tlingit or Haida", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Tlingit or Haida", "Disp_Dimen" : "5 1/8 in. (13 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "5 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Bone", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Bone", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Combs were worn by shamans during curing ceremonies as well as when they were not practicing. Decorated with both spirit helpers and crest emblems, they were also used by chiefs and women of status. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Presented by the Rochester Historical Society", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Decorative Arts", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American or First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.62_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.62_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.62_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.62_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25820", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7486, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7486", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.45", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Face Mask", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Nuxálk", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Nuxálk", "Disp_Dimen" : "29 1/2 x 18 x 11 in. (74.9 x 45.7 x 27.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "29 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "18 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Nuxalkmc (Nuxálk people) were once referred to as the "Bella Coola." Their homeland and territory are located in and around the Bella Coola valley on the central coast of what is now known as British Columbia, Canada. A rugged inland area located 75 miles from the Pacific Ocean, the region features high mountains rising steeply from the shores of inlets. Nuxálk traditional stories are filled with fabulous beings, many human in form and represented by masked performers in ceremonial dance dramas. Both natural and commercial pigments were used in the decoration of masks, and the characteristic blue, vermilion and black painting is dramatic and distinctive. Very little is known about this mask that is too large to have been worn. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Isabel C. Herdle", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Per Art Committee minutes of Oct 1984, purchased by Ms. Herdle at a Rochester art fair, from a man whose grandfather had acquired it while building the Canadian-Pacific railroad.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.45_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.45_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.45_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.45_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26809", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2598, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2598", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.141", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1860-1900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1860", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1900", "Disp_Title" : "Jar (Olla)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Zuni Pueblo", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Zuni Pueblo", "Disp_Dimen" : "8 7/8 x 13 3/4 in. (22.5 x 35 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "8 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "13 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay and mineral paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Focusing more on design motifs and less on symmetry of form, a Zuni jar often combines lyrical figures with geometric abstractions. This jar depicts a distinctive Zuni design, a painting of a deer with a heart-line: a red arrow of life or breath that extends from its mouth to its chest. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harris K. Prior", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.141_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.141_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.141_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.141_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25824", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.141_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.141_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.141_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.141_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25825", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2833, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2833", "Disp_Access_No" : "1922.7", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Basket with Lid", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Hopi", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Hopi", "Disp_Dimen" : "5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in. diam. (14 x 19.1 cm diam.)", "Disp_Height" : "5 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Yucca palm leaves", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Yucca palm leaves, natural dyes", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This deep coiled basket is comprised of yucca fibers sewn over grass bundles. The leaves of the yucca plant supplied a variety of hues suitable for basket making, ranging from white to pale yellow to green. Black dye was made from sunflower seeds combined with piñon gum and ochre. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Henry A. Strong", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Basketry", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.7_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.7_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.7_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.7_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25861", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5244, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5244", "Disp_Access_No" : "1922.12", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Basket", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, First Nations (Canada)", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, First Nations (Canada)", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 x 9 x 12 3/4 in. (22.9 x 22.9 x 32.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Cherry", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Cherry bark", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1897, after her first husband deserted her and her child, a young nurse named Hattie Lockwood pooled her resources with another friend in Tacoma and determined to build a hospital for injured miners in Skagway, Alaska. On the voyage north, their ship was wrecked in a blizzard; all their building and medical supplies were lost, and the women barely escaped with their lives. After three grueling years in the Alaskan wilderness, Lockwood returned to the United States and eventually married Henry Strong, the first president of Eastman Kodak Co. This and several other baskets the new Mrs. Strong had acquired during her youthful sojourn were later donated to MAG. The “chainsaw” pattern was designed after First Nations people in British Columbia became aware of logging operations near the Fraser River. The red portions are natural-color cherry bark; the black is cherry bark darkened from being buried in “muck and charcoal.” [Label text from It Came From the Vault exhibition, 2013]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Henry A. Strong", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Basketry", "Creation_Place2" : "First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.12_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.12_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.12_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.12_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25862", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2837, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2837", "Disp_Access_No" : "1922.17", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Basket", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Nisqually", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Nisqually", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 1/2 x 9 3/4 in. (24.1 x 24.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Cherry", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Cherry bark", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Henry A. Strong", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Basketry", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.17_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.17_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.17_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.17_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25865", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2839, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2839", "Disp_Access_No" : "1922.19", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Basket", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Puyallup", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Puyallup", "Disp_Dimen" : "8 1/2 x 7 1/4 x 10 1/4 in. (21.6 x 18.4 x 26 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "8 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Henry A. Strong", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Basketry", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.19_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.19_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.19_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.19_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25866", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 9071, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/9071", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.340", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "String of Wampum", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Native American", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Native American", "Disp_Dimen" : "39 in. (99.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "39 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Rochester Historical Society", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Decorative Arts", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.340_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.340_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.340_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.340_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "27405", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7899, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7899", "Disp_Access_No" : "1922.29", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Drinking Cup", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, First Nations (Canada)", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, First Nations (Canada)", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 1/2 x 4 x 4 in. (8.9 x 10.2 x 10.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Cherry", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Cherry bark", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Henry A. Strong", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.29_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.29_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.29_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.29_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25871", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2824, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2824", "Disp_Access_No" : "1933.28", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Ladle", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Tlingit or Haida", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Tlingit or Haida", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 in. (17.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Horn", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Horn", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Feast spoons were a prestige item brought out during special occasions to serve soup or stew. This spoon was made of mountain-goat horn, which was soaked and steamed, bent into shape, cooled in a mold, and then carved. The handles of these spoons resemble totem poles, with crest images carefully carved; here you see a raven and a seal. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Presented by the Rochester Historical Society", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Decorative Arts", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American or First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/33.28_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/33.28_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/33.28_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/33.28_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25817", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 10110, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/10110", "Disp_Access_No" : "1983.18", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Grease Dish", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Nisga'a", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Nisga'a", "Disp_Dimen" : "2 1/4 x 5 1/2 x 11 3/4 in. (5.7 x 14 x 29.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "2 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Cedar, opercula (sea snail shell) inlay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The eulachon fish, a type of smelt with a very high oil content, was dried then pressed for its oil. This oil (still used today in cooking and flavoring) was placed in a grease dish on the table, into which diners would dip dried fish and other delicacies. This dish is decorated around the rim with opercula, the highly prized ornamental part of a snail shell. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Nathaniel T. Whitcomb", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.18_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.18_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.18_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.18_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26666", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }