{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 3282, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3282", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.96", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1931", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1931", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1931", "Disp_Title" : "Ballet Mechanique", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Charles Sheeler", "Sort_Artist" : "Sheeler, Charles", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 1/2 x 10 1/4 in. (26.7 x 26 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "10 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "image", "Medium" : "Conte crayon", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Conte crayon ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1927, Charles Sheeler was commissioned to photograph Henry Ford’s River Rouge car factory outside Detroit to advertise the company’s new Model A car. Ford’s innovations in the assembly line were celebrated for their efficiency, productivity, and ability to produce low-cost consumer goods. Yet the dark underside to this progress was unbearable, dehumanizing work conditions. <em>Ballet Mechanique</em>, based on a photo from Sheeler’s Ford factory series, is a tightly-cropped scene of an industrial system of pipes and metal. By isolating the sleek machinery from actual labor, Sheeler elevates the loud, hot, dangerous factory environment to a cool, sleek, abstract vision of modernity. Sheeler’s style, Precisionism, was a celebration of the technological sublime with its crisp, pure form and industrial themes. Of American artists in the early years of the 1900s, Charles Sheeler made one of the most dramatic breaks from the traditional assumption that beauty could be found in nature alone. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Peter Iselin and his sister, Emilie Iselin Wiggin", "Copyright_Type" : "No existing copyright holder", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.96_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.96_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.96_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.96_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12464", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print master derived 11/23/09 by Lu Harper for Seeing America lesson plans.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3743, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3743", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.94", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1935", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1935", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1935", "Disp_Title" : "Totems in Steel", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Charles Sheeler", "Sort_Artist" : "Sheeler, Charles", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 11/16 x 5 1/8 in. (9.4 x 13 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 11/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "image", "Medium" : "Gouache", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Gouache ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This image of a New York City construction site is based on a film still from Charles Sheeler’s 1920 film collaboration with photographer Paul Strand, <em>Manhatta</em>. In the ten-minute film, the artists track the dynamism of Manhattan through the course of a day, focusing on the unique pulse and geometry of the city’s machinery, vehicles, and architecture. <em>Manhatta</em> provided Sheeler with numerous images from which he later painted. The title of this painting, <em>Totems in Steel</em>, frames modern engineering, industry, and architecture in quasi-religious terms. Sheeler wrote, “In a period such as ours when only a comparatively few individuals seem to be given to religion, some form other than the Gothic cathedral must be found. Industry concerns the greatest numbers—it may be true, as has been said, that our factories are our substitute for religious expression.” [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Peter Iselin and his sister, Emilie Iselin Wiggin", "Copyright_Type" : "No existing copyright holder", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.94_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.94_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.94_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.94_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "27604", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk dated 1-16-05", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }