{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 1418, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1418", "Disp_Access_No" : "1988.28", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1971", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1971", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1971", "Disp_Title" : "Why Is My Turtle Losing His Appetite?", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Randolph Carter", "Sort_Artist" : "Carter, John Randolph", "Disp_Dimen" : "25 7/16 x 38 1/8 in. (64.6 x 96.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "25 7/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "38 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color serigraph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Philip and Florence Goldberg", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/88.28_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/88.28_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/88.28_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/88.28_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12754", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 934, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/934", "Disp_Access_No" : "1967.19", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1966", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1966", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1966", "Disp_Title" : "Side View Mirror", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Allan D'Arcangelo", "Sort_Artist" : "D'Arcangelo, Allan", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 x 5 1/2 x 5 1/4 in. (17.8 x 14 x 13.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Printer's ink", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "General Acquisitions Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/67.19_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/67.19_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/67.19_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/67.19_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31835", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/67.19_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/67.19_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/67.19_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/67.19_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "31836", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 940, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/940", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.333.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1965", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1965", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1965", "Disp_Title" : "Rainbow Faucet", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Jim Dine", "Sort_Artist" : "Dine, Jim", "Disp_Dimen" : "4 3/4 x 5 in. (12.1 x 12.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "4 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Aluminum", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Cast aluminum and paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : ""Seven Objects in a Box" "Seven Objects in a Box" was the first edition of Pop multiples - that is an editioned group of objects instead of prints. Rosa Esman, a young art collector on a budget, who attended all of the Pop shows and witnessed the popularity of the Warhol and Lichtenstein shopping bags, believed that Pop objects might be met with the same enthusiasm. She had already published the Pop print portfolio, "New York Ten," in 1964. Since artists had begun using or creating objects themselves - Warhol was making Brillo boxes and signing real Campbell soup cans, and Jasper Johns made sculptures of beer cans - Esman envisioned that the next step would be to have artists make a group of objects for a portfolio. The availability of new technology made it possible to create the artist's visions. For example, Tom Wesselmann's "Little Nude" could not have been created before World War II because the technology of vacuum-formed molding was not available. The artists also needed the ability to mass-produce the objects they designed. Luckily, New York was the perfect place to find offbeat cottage industries capable of producing 100 sand cast faucets and baked enamel sunrises. The result of Esman's effort is a combination of objects quite typical of each artist's personal work. Warhol used a still from a movie he made in 1963 called "The Kiss." The film froze on a close-up of a black man and a white woman kissing, a subject considered quite provocative at the time. Wesselmann's "Little Nude" is lifted right from his "Great American Nude" series, which he began in 1961, featuring highly simplified, stylized, abruptly cropped female bodies, usually focusing on the lips, nipples and genitalia. D'Arcangelo's "Side-View Mirror" takes his signature highway motif one step further by placing it in actual side-view mirror hardware. In the end, what is left is a series of small-scale mementos of each artist's larger works: mass-produced objects available to the public at a reasonable price so that "consumers" could also be "collectors." [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.333.2_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.333.2_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.333.2_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.333.2_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31841", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1570, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1570", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.329.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1964", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1964", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1964", "Disp_Title" : "Self-Portrait", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Jim Dine", "Sort_Artist" : "Dine, Jim", "Disp_Dimen" : "22 1/8 x 16 15/16 in. (56.2 x 43 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "22 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "16 15/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching", "Info_Page_Comm" : "From the portfolio "New York Ten" This work claims to be a self-portrait, although we don't actually see what we typically expect in a portrait - a face. One of the trademarks of Pop Art is the absence of the artist's hand - many of them wanted their work to look machine-made or mass-produced. Pop Art, as well as many other art movements throughout the ages, often prompted the question "What is art?" This work also invites the question "What is a portrait?" [Gallery label text] The self-portrait has been redefined by a number of artists in contemporary times. In Dine’s case, the substitution of a bathrobe for the artist’s face is a witty twist on an old theme, simultaneously conveying anonymity and “cozy familiarity,” in the words of one writer. Like Warhol’s Campbell’s soup can, Dine’s bathrobe has become a signature image of Pop art of the Sixties. In addition to his unconventional approach to self-portraiture, Dine’s printing technique “breaks the rules” as well. Rather than being centered on the paper, the image is asymmetrically placed, which creates a cropped effect. [Label text, 1997]", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.329.2_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.329.2_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.329.2_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.329.2_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12741", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1894, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1894", "Disp_Access_No" : "1993.22", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1966", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1966", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1966", "Disp_Title" : "Love", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Robert Indiana", "Sort_Artist" : "Indiana, Robert", "Disp_Dimen" : "32 x 23 15/16 in. (81.3 x 60.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "32 in.", "Disp_Width" : "23 15/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet/image", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color serigraph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Gallery label text 2013: In 1964, Mr. Indiana designed the ''Love'' graphic for a Christmas card for the Museum of Modern Art. The logo took off, and in May 1966 he had a show of variations on the theme at the Stable Gallery in Manhattan. The graphic became central to the 1960's visual vocabulary, appearing on clothes, jewelry, towels and rugs. The 1973 postage stamp with the logo was one of the best-selling stamps ever, the first of the US Postal Service regular series of “love stamps.” Mr. Indiana said he received only $1,000 for the design. (He had failed to copyright the logo, and so did not profit as it appeared on countless coffee cups and T-shirts.) The logo did not endear Mr. Indiana to the art establishment, and his star faded in inverse proportion to the success of ''Love.'' ", "Dedication" : "Transfer from the Education Collection", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Transferred from Education Department''s School Loan materials. Original source unknown.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.22_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.22_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.22_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.22_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12709", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 6336, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/6336", "Disp_Access_No" : "1976.112", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1965", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1965", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1965", "Disp_Title" : "Miss America", "Alt_Title" : "Sweet Doll Mis America", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Allen Jones", "Sort_Artist" : "Jones, Allen", "Disp_Dimen" : "23 15/16 x 20 in. (60.8 x 50.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "23 15/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet/image", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "wove paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "From the portfolio "Eleven Pop Artists, Volume III"", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel G. Schuman", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "British", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/76.112_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/76.112_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/76.112_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/76.112_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12710", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 9007, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/9007", "Disp_Access_No" : "1991.21", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1985", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1985", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1985", "Disp_Title" : "Auschwitz Warns: Mona Lisa", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Aleksandr Lemberskiy", "Sort_Artist" : "Lemberskiy, Aleksandr", "Disp_Dimen" : "37 x 27 in. (94 x 68.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "37 in.", "Disp_Width" : "27 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet/image", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color serigraph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "By the early 1970s, artists in the Soviet Union were creating work reflecting the influence of Pop Art. Vitaly Komar and Alexander Melamid, the fathers of the Soviet offspring of Pop Art, called their new movement "Sots Art." Rather than creating images of Campbell Soup cans and other consumer goods used by their American counterparts, Sots artists appropriated official slogans and images from the political propaganda that confronted them daily. Their new art was often critical of Communism and Fascism, and in the 80s and early 90s, many artists, including Lemberskiy, found it necessary to emigrate to America. Lemberskiy discusses his juxtaposition of images in this poster in the following passage: "Leonardo Da Vinci's "La Gioconda" ["Mona Lisa"] is an image of a woman of the 16th century, noble and convincing. For us she is a symbol executed by a great master. Next to her, the Mona Lisa of the 20th century, just as noble and convincing, has retained her traits in the face of animal-like Fascists who have made her undress and in a few minutes will send her to the gas chamber. Millions of "Giocondas" of the 20th century endured the hardships, suffering, and gas chambers [of the Holocaust]. Teir last path is portrayed through the rhythms and repetitions of one face. In comparing the two characters, one can confidently say that the "new" Mona Lisa is just as magnificent despite the fact that she is not drawn by the great Leonardo. With their similarities, they [both] portray the spirit of their time."", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Russian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/91.21_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/91.21_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/91.21_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/91.21_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12711", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 996, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/996", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.333.3", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1966", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1966", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1966", "Disp_Title" : "Sunrise", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Roy Lichtenstein", "Sort_Artist" : "Lichtenstein, Roy", "Disp_Dimen" : "8 1/2 x 11 x 1 in. (21.6 x 27.9 x 2.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "8 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "11 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Enamel", "Support" : "metal", "Disp_Medium" : "Enamel on metal", "Info_Page_Comm" : ""Seven Objects in a Box" "Seven Objects in a Box" was the first edition of Pop multiples - that is an editioned group of objects instead of prints. Rosa Esman, a young art collector on a budget, who attended all of the Pop shows and witnessed the popularity of the Warhol and Lichtenstein shopping bags, believed that Pop objects might be met with the same enthusiasm. She had already published the Pop print portfolio, "New York Ten," in 1964. Since artists had begun using or creating objects themselves - Warhol was making Brillo boxes and signing real Campbell soup cans, and Jasper Johns made sculptures of beer cans - Esman envisioned that the next step would be to have artists make a group of objects for a portfolio. The availability of new technology made it possible to create the artist's visions. For example, Tom Wesselmann's "Little Nude" could not have been created before World War II because the technology of vacuum-formed molding was not available. The artists also needed the ability to mass-produce the objects they designed. Luckily, New York was the perfect place to find offbeat cottage industries capable of producing 100 sand cast faucets and baked enamel sunrises. The result of Esman's effort is a combination of objects quite typical of each artist's personal work. Warhol used a still from a movie he made in 1963 called "The Kiss." The film froze on a close-up of a black man and a white woman kissing, a subject considered quite provocative at the time. Wesselmann's "Little Nude" is lifted right from his "Great American Nude" series, which he began in 1961, featuring highly simplified, stylized, abruptly cropped female bodies, usually focusing on the lips, nipples and genitalia. D'Arcangelo's "Side-View Mirror" takes his signature highway motif one step further by placing it in actual side-view mirror hardware. In the end, what is left is a series of small-scale mementos of each artist's larger works: mass-produced objects available to the public at a reasonable price so that "consumers" could also be "collectors." [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.333.3_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.333.3_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.333.3_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.333.3_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31842", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2002, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2002", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.66", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1965", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1965", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1965", "Disp_Title" : "Sweet Dreams Baby!", "Alt_Title" : "Pow", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Roy Lichtenstein", "Sort_Artist" : "Lichtenstein, Roy", "Disp_Dimen" : "37 11/16 x 27 5/8 in. (95.7 x 70.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "37 11/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "27 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color serigraph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "From the portfolio "Eleven Pop Artists, Volume III" Gallery label text 2013: Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein first gained attention for his appropriation and elevation of the visual vocabulary of comic strips. Here he combines humor and drama with his signature Ben-Day dots, thick outlines, speech balloons, and cropped images. Sweet Dreams Baby! was included in Eleven Pop Artists III, one of a series of three portfolios of prints by American and British Pop artists. Widely circulated in Europe, this portfolio was instrumental in generating international interest in the Pop Art movement. ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.66_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.66_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.66_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.66_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12801", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1028, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1028", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.333.4", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1966", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1966", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1966", "Disp_Title" : "Baked Potato", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Claes Oldenburg", "Sort_Artist" : "Oldenburg, Claes", "Disp_Dimen" : "4 1/2 x 10 1/2 x 7 1/4 in. (11.4 x 26.7 x 18.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "4 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "10 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "maximum", "Medium" : "Acrylic", "Support" : "resin", "Disp_Medium" : "Painted cast resin on a Shenango china dish", "Info_Page_Comm" : ""Seven Objects in a Box" "Seven Objects in a Box" was the first edition of Pop multiples - that is an editioned group of objects instead of prints. Rosa Esman, a young art collector on a budget, who attended all of the Pop shows and witnessed the popularity of the Warhol and Lichtenstein shopping bags, believed that Pop objects might be met with the same enthusiasm. She had already published the Pop print portfolio, "New York Ten," in 1964. Since artists had begun using or creating objects themselves - Warhol was making Brillo boxes and signing real Campbell soup cans, and Jasper Johns made sculptures of beer cans - Esman envisioned that the next step would be to have artists make a group of objects for a portfolio. The availability of new technology made it possible to create the artist's visions. For example, Tom Wesselmann's "Little Nude" could not have been created before World War II because the technology of vacuum-formed molding was not available. The artists also needed the ability to mass-produce the objects they designed. Luckily, New York was the perfect place to find offbeat cottage industries capable of producing 100 sand cast faucets and baked enamel sunrises. The result of Esman's effort is a combination of objects quite typical of each artist's personal work. Warhol used a still from a movie he made in 1963 called "The Kiss." The film froze on a close-up of a black man and a white woman kissing, a subject considered quite provocative at the time. Wesselmann's "Little Nude" is lifted right from his "Great American Nude" series, which he began in 1961, featuring highly simplified, stylized, abruptly cropped female bodies, usually focusing on the lips, nipples and genitalia. D'Arcangelo's "Side-View Mirror" takes his signature highway motif one step further by placing it in actual side-view mirror hardware. In the end, what is left is a series of small-scale mementos of each artist's larger works: mass-produced objects available to the public at a reasonable price so that "consumers" could also be "collectors." [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.333.4_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.333.4_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.333.4_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.333.4_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31843", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2180, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2180", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.329.8", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1964", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1964", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1964", "Disp_Title" : "Flying Pizza", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Claes Oldenburg", "Sort_Artist" : "Oldenburg, Claes", "Disp_Dimen" : "17 x 22 in. (43.2 x 55.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "17 in.", "Disp_Width" : "22 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet/image", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "From the portfolio "New York Ten"", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Runs, 3 runs on 3 stones: 1 stone - brown 2 stone - red 3 stone - black", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.329.8_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.329.8_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.329.8_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.329.8_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41186", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2247, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2247", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.47", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Self Portrait in the Bathtub", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Clayton Pond", "Sort_Artist" : "Pond, Clayton", "Disp_Dimen" : "23 1/16 x 29 in. (58.5 x 73.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "23 1/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "29 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color serigraph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Clayton Pond, a second-generation Pop artist, transformed everyday objects into icons. Color and texture played a key role in his work. His electric color combinations and his experimental technique of adding a layer of high gloss varnish to the surface of his prints create a lustrous effect. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.47_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.47_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.47_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.47_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12719", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2258, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2258", "Disp_Access_No" : "1976.123", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1965", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1965", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1965", "Disp_Title" : "Miss Comfort Creme", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Mel Ramos", "Sort_Artist" : "Ramos, Mel", "Disp_Dimen" : "40 x 30 1/16 in. (101.6 x 76.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "40 in.", "Disp_Width" : "30 1/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color serigraph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Ramos was a California native, like his friend and teacher, Wayne Thiebaud. Surrealism and then Abstract Expressionism influenced him early in his career. As his work became more figural, he turned for inspiration to the comic books he loved as a child. He painted his favorite comic book heroes and when he ran out of subjects, he began looking at other magazines for material. He combined pin-ups with commercial products, which evolved into the "Beauty and the Beast" series involving pin-ups and animals, then to an art history series reworking famous paintings of the Old Masters in his own slick style. [Gallery label text] From the portfolio "Eleven Pop Artists, Volume III" ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel G. Schuman", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/76.123_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/76.123_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/76.123_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/76.123_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12722", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 10362, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/10362", "Disp_Access_No" : "1981.50.6", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1970", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1970", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1970", "Disp_Title" : "Surface Series #42", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Robert Rauschenberg", "Sort_Artist" : "Rauschenberg, Robert", "Disp_Dimen" : "40 x 40 in. (101.6 x 101.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "40 in.", "Disp_Width" : "40 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color serigraph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1970, Rauschenberg did a large installation called "Currents" for Dayton's Gallery 12 in Minneapolis. The work filled the entire gallery, measuring 6 feet high by 54 feet long. It consisted of collages made from newspaper clippings that were transferred to silkscreen. Of the images, Rauschenberg said "The world condition permitted me no choice of subject or color and method/composition." He then made two portfolios, "Features" and "Surface Series," using the images from the Minneapolis installation. In "Surface Series," he used combinations of the images, sometimes placing the negative of one image over the positive of another. A final inking with a black ghostly pattern gives them a moiré effect. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Joan and Martin Messinger", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Runs: Three screens, two black, one white", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/81.50.6_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/81.50.6_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/81.50.6_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/81.50.6_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12783", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1054, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1054", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.333.5", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1965", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1960", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1970", "Disp_Title" : "Reclining Rooster", "Alt_Title" : "Chicken", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "George Segal", "Sort_Artist" : "Segal, George", "Disp_Dimen" : "4 x 19 x 12 1/2 in. (10.2 x 48.3 x 31.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "19 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "maximum", "Medium" : "Acrylic", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Cast acrylic and fiberglass", "Info_Page_Comm" : ""Seven Objects in a Box" "Seven Objects in a Box" was the first edition of Pop multiples - that is an editioned group of objects instead of prints. Rosa Esman, a young art collector on a budget, who attended all of the Pop shows and witnessed the popularity of the Warhol and Lichtenstein shopping bags, believed that Pop objects might be met with the same enthusiasm. She had already published the Pop print portfolio, "New York Ten," in 1964. Since artists had begun using or creating objects themselves - Warhol was making Brillo boxes and signing real Campbell soup cans, and Jasper Johns made sculptures of beer cans - Esman envisioned that the next step would be to have artists make a group of objects for a portfolio. The availability of new technology made it possible to create the artist's visions. For example, Tom Wesselmann's "Little Nude" could not have been created before World War II because the technology of vacuum-formed molding was not available. The artists also needed the ability to mass-produce the objects they designed. Luckily, New York was the perfect place to find offbeat cottage industries capable of producing 100 sand cast faucets and baked enamel sunrises. The result of Esman's effort is a combination of objects quite typical of each artist's personal work. Warhol used a still from a movie he made in 1963 called "The Kiss." The film froze on a close-up of a black man and a white woman kissing, a subject considered quite provocative at the time. Wesselmann's "Little Nude" is lifted right from his "Great American Nude" series, which he began in 1961, featuring highly simplified, stylized, abruptly cropped female bodies, usually focusing on the lips, nipples and genitalia. D'Arcangelo's "Side-View Mirror" takes his signature highway motif one step further by placing it in actual side-view mirror hardware. In the end, what is left is a series of small-scale mementos of each artist's larger works: mass-produced objects available to the public at a reasonable price so that "consumers" could also be "collectors." [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.333.5_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.333.5_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.333.5_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.333.5_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31845", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3941, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3941", "Disp_Access_No" : "1999.46", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1971", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1971", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1971", "Disp_Title" : "Big Suckers", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Wayne Thiebaud", "Sort_Artist" : "Thiebaud, Wayne", "Disp_Dimen" : "22 x 29 11/16 in. (55.9 x 75.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "22 in.", "Disp_Width" : "29 11/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color aquatint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Wayne Thiebaud's early career in California as a cartoonist and a commercial illustrator influenced his later work. At the age of thirty, he returned to art school and started his notable career as an artist and art professor soon after finishing his Master's degree. His subject matter more than his artistic style or philosophy has allied him with the Pop Art movement. Thiebaud started painting images of everyday objects, including gumball machines, cakes, sandwiches and candy, in the early 1960s. In 1962, he exhibited at the Allan Stone Gallery and the Sidney Janis Gallery in New York, precisely when Pop Art was taking center stage. While many Pop artists, including Warhol and Lichtenstein, tried to give their work a machine-made look, the hand of the artist remains evident in Thiebaud's work. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Robert and Anne-Marie Logan", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Five colors - yellow, cerulean blue, red, black, ultramarine blue", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/99.46_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/99.46_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/99.46_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/99.46_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "36226", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2461, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2461", "Disp_Access_No" : "1978.97", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1966", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1966", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1966", "Disp_Title" : "Campbell's Soup Can on Shopping Bag", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Andy Warhol", "Sort_Artist" : "Warhol, Andy", "Disp_Dimen" : "19 1/2 x 16 15/16 in. (49.5 x 43 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "19 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "16 15/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "bag without handle", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color serigraph on shopping bag", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This bag was published for a Warhol exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, on view from October 1 - November 6, 1966. Two years earlier, serigraphed shopping bags sporting a Warhol soup can and a Lichtenstein turkey were made for an exhibit entitled "American Supermarket" at the Bianchini Gallery in New York. Signed by the artists, in editions of about 125 each, they cost $12 apiece. Sold as exhibition souvenirs, the shopping bags were an instant hit. People used them until they fell apart and now those novelty items have gained a status completely counter to their original intent. [Gallery label text 2012] Andy Warhol designed this bag with his iconic Campbell’s Soup can for a 1966 exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston. Sold as ephemeral souvenirs, those that have held up the past 45 years have gained a lofty status counter to their original intent. The popularity of these shopping bags and others like them inspired the production of other Pop multiples as seen in the case nearby, including Warhol’s Kiss. ", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Genesee Valley School Development Association", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Published for a Warhol exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, MA, October 1 - November 6, 1966. Unknown edition size and an unknown number signed.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/78.97_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/78.97_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/78.97_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/78.97_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12738", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2470, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2470", "Disp_Access_No" : "1976.134", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1969", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1969", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1969", "Disp_Title" : "#III", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "William Weege", "Sort_Artist" : "Weege, William", "Disp_Dimen" : "22 15/16 x 17 15/16 in. (58.3 x 45.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "22 15/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "17 15/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet/image", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color serigraph and flocking on gold paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "William Weege was always interested in unusual and experimental textures in printmaking. For example, he has been known to adhere cut and sewn pieces of paper to his work, and to print images on objects, like records. During his early career, his work often contained political messages about war and peace. Weege was born in Milwaukee and spent most of his life in Wisconsin. He received his MA and his MFA from the University of Wisconsin at Madison and went on to teach there for most of his career. From 1968 to 1970, Weege served as the Director of the Experimental Workshop at the Smithsonian Institution, at which time he made this print. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel G. Schuman", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/76.134_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/76.134_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/76.134_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/76.134_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "12734", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/76.134_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/76.134_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/76.134_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/76.134_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "52549", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1073, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1073", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.333.7", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1966", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1966", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1966", "Disp_Title" : "Little Nude", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Tom Wesselmann", "Sort_Artist" : "Wesselmann, Tom", "Disp_Dimen" : "8 x 8 x 1 1/2 in. (20.3 x 20.3 x 3.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "maximum", "Medium" : "Plexiglas", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Spray-painted vacuum-formed Plexiglas", "Info_Page_Comm" : ""Seven Objects in a Box" "Seven Objects in a Box" was the first edition of Pop multiples - that is an editioned group of objects instead of prints. Rosa Esman, a young art collector on a budget, who attended all of the Pop shows and witnessed the popularity of the Warhol and Lichtenstein shopping bags, believed that Pop objects might be met with the same enthusiasm. She had already published the Pop print portfolio, "New York Ten," in 1964. Since artists had begun using or creating objects themselves - Warhol was making Brillo boxes and signing real Campbell soup cans, and Jasper Johns made sculptures of beer cans - Esman envisioned that the next step would be to have artists make a group of objects for a portfolio. The availability of new technology made it possible to create the artist's visions. For example, Tom Wesselmann's "Little Nude" could not have been created before World War II because the technology of vacuum-formed molding was not available. The artists also needed the ability to mass-produce the objects they designed. Luckily, New York was the perfect place to find offbeat cottage industries capable of producing 100 sand cast faucets and baked enamel sunrises. The result of Esman's effort is a combination of objects quite typical of each artist's personal work. Warhol used a still from a movie he made in 1963 called "The Kiss." The film froze on a close-up of a black man and a white woman kissing, a subject considered quite provocative at the time. Wesselmann's "Little Nude" is lifted right from his "Great American Nude" series, which he began in 1961, featuring highly simplified, stylized, abruptly cropped female bodies, usually focusing on the lips, nipples and genitalia. D'Arcangelo's "Side-View Mirror" takes his signature highway motif one step further by placing it in actual side-view mirror hardware. In the end, what is left is a series of small-scale mementos of each artist's larger works: mass-produced objects available to the public at a reasonable price so that "consumers" could also be "collectors." [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.333.7_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.333.7_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.333.7_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.333.7_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31846", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }