{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 22241, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/22241", "Disp_Access_No" : "18.2009L", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2004", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2004", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2004", "Disp_Title" : "Rug", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Isabel John", "Sort_Artist" : "John, Isabel", "Disp_Dimen" : "36 x 24 in. (91.4 x 61 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "36 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wool, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The current Navajo Nation covers 27,000 square miles over a large chunk of Arizona, part of New Mexico and a section of Utah. Known as one of the finest weavers of Navajo pictorials, Isabel John lived with her family at Many Farms, Arizona. Navajo pictorials, a deviation from traditional rugs showcasing geometric patterns, originated in the mid-twentieth century and incorporate scenes from daily life. John learned to weave from her mother and began weaving pictorials in 1972. Using both vegetal and commercial dyes, and store-bought as well as handspun wool from her own sheep, it often took her a year and a half to make one rug. This rug illustrates the actual weaving of a pictorial rug and the people and landscape that inspired it. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Loaned by Vee Angle", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Textiles", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/18.2009L_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/18.2009L_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/18.2009L_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/18.2009L_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31040", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "This photo is cropped from inventory photo 18.2009L_I1.jpg so it coudl be made web accessible.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14106, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14106", "Disp_Access_No" : "2006.39", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1960s", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1955", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1965", "Disp_Title" : "Jar", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Maria Martinez", "Sort_Artist" : "Martinez, Maria", "Disp_Dimen" : "4 3/4 x 6 in. (12.1 x 15.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "4 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "6 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "pieced sheets", "Medium" : "Blackware", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Blackware", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The name and work of Maria Martinez is recognized far and wide. Learning the art of pottery-making from her aunt, she began making pots with her husband Julian Martinez several years after they were married. They became well-known for their distinctive black-on-black ware, made by combining designs that had been highly burnished (and appeared glossy) with those that were slip-painted (and appeared matte). Maria continued to produce pottery after Julian’s death in 1943, collaborating with family members. This jar was made with her son, Popovi Da. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Bequest of Phyllis Clark", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2006.39_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2006.39_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2006.39_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2006.39_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31036", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2562, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2562", "Disp_Access_No" : "1922.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1895", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1905", "Disp_Title" : "Bowl", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Nampeyo", "Sort_Artist" : "Nampeyo", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 x 9 1/4 in. (7.6 x 23.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay with mineral pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Nampeyo's name and her descendants are cultural icons of Pueblo pottery. Belonging to the Hopi First Mesa pueblo, she learned to make pots at an early age. She is credited with the revival of Hopi pottery-making in the early 20th century, a result of her great skill and innovative adaptations of traditional forms and designs. The interior of this bowl is decorated with an image of a katsina, a supernatural being embodied by masked dancers of the pueblos. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Henry A. Strong", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : ""The ''Katchena'' painted in the bowl is a charm used in the snake dances. --collector''s notes in file", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.1_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.1_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.1_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.1_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "24115", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 21301, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/21301", "Disp_Access_No" : "2.2008L", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2000", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2000", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2000", "Disp_Title" : "Tlingit Magic Hat", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Preston Singletary", "Sort_Artist" : "Singletary, Preston", "Disp_Dimen" : "21 x 19 in. (53.3 x 48.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "21 in.", "Disp_Width" : "19 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Glass", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Like all of Preston Singletary’s work, Tlingit Magic Hat fuses the traditional designs of his Native Northwest culture with the modern materials and techniques of contemporary art glass. Transformation themes, shamanism, and basketry patterns are among his inspirations. Singletary based this work on a centuries-old Tlingit design (see photo below), yet here the enhanced crown represents the fin of a killer whale. Singletary started blowing glass directly out of high school and developed his style and approach through practical experience and by working with area artists, both Native and non-Native. Currently a member of the Board of Trustees at the Pilchuck Glass School, his work is included in museum collections throughout the world. [Summer 2015]", "Dedication" : "Loaned by Nancy and Alan Cameros", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Glass", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2.2008L_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2.2008L_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2.2008L_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2.2008L_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "27423", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2580, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2580", "Disp_Access_No" : "1927.26", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1860-1927", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1860", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1927", "Disp_Title" : "Jar (Olla)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Acoma Pueblo", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Acoma Pueblo", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 9/16 x 11 7/16 in. (24.3 x 29 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 9/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "11 7/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay and mineral paints", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Typically thin-walled and light-weight, ollas were originally used to carry and store water. As with most pueblo pottery, women traditionally made the jars; they dug the clay, painted designs using colors derived from plants or minerals and fired the pots. This tightly-drawn overall geometric pattern is one of many variations in Acoma design, a mark of potters responding to changing economic demands, and bridging those demands with ties to their traditional forms. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. James Sibley Watson", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/27.26_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/27.26_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/27.26_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/27.26_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25813", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/27.26_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/27.26_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/27.26_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/27.26_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25814", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2578, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2578", "Disp_Access_No" : "1927.24", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Jar", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Anasazi", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Anasazi", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 1/2 x 4 3/4 in. (8.9 x 12.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay and mineral paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Once living in what is now the Four Corners – where Utah, Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico meet - the Anasazi were the ancestors of modern Hopi, Zuni and other Pueblo peoples. Their accomplished forms were decorated with both polychrome designs and the black-on-white patterns seen here. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. James Sibley Watson", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/27.24_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/27.24_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/27.24_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/27.24_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "23813", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 12646, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/12646", "Disp_Access_No" : "2004.27", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Basket (Olla)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Apache", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Apache", "Disp_Dimen" : "18 x 11 1/4 in. (45.7 x 28.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "18 in.", "Disp_Width" : "11 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Grasses", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Grasses, dyes", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Apache people have long been known for their exquisite basket work. Women made the baskets from thin sticks of willow, cottonwood, or sumac which they collected, soaked and then stitched together. Color was added with a variety of natural dyes. This large olla, or jar-shaped basket, is decorated with human, animal and geometric forms. Made for sale, it took a highly skilled weaver to manage the geometric patterns and designs on such a large basket, which required many months to complete and would have been highly prized. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Gorham Parks", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Basketry", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2004.27_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2004.27_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2004.27_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2004.27_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26555", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2833, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2833", "Disp_Access_No" : "1922.7", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Basket with Lid", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Hopi", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Hopi", "Disp_Dimen" : "5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in. diam. (14 x 19.1 cm diam.)", "Disp_Height" : "5 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Yucca palm leaves", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Yucca palm leaves, natural dyes", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This deep coiled basket is comprised of yucca fibers sewn over grass bundles. The leaves of the yucca plant supplied a variety of hues suitable for basket making, ranging from white to pale yellow to green. Black dye was made from sunflower seeds combined with piñon gum and ochre. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Henry A. Strong", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Basketry", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.7_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.7_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.7_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.7_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25861", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2853, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2853", "Disp_Access_No" : "1976.151a-b", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Basket with Lid", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Native American", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Native American", "Disp_Dimen" : "1 5/8 x 3 x 3 in. (4.1 x 7.6 x 7.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "1 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Grasses", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Grasses", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Whether for gathering, carrying or storing, the forms of most baskets announce their function. This lidded basket would have been ideal for the tourist trade - small, easily transportable, and the perfect container for trinkets. It’s made by the technique of coiling, with bundles of grasses used as the foundation for the coils. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Miss Helen C. Ellwanger", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Basketry", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/76.151_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/76.151_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/76.151_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/76.151_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25884", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2848, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2848", "Disp_Access_No" : "1922.32", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Clam Basket", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Native American", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Native American", "Disp_Dimen" : "12 1/4 x 11 x 14 1/2 in. (31.1 x 27.9 x 36.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "12 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "11 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Bark", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Cherry bark fibers, mountain grass", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This basket from an unidentified Coast Salish group was probably used to collect clams, mussels, small fish, seaweed and other saltwater resources. The open twined container provided drainage and also helped prevent mold and insect infestation when used for food storage. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Henry A. Strong", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Basketry", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.32_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.32_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.32_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.32_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25810", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2840, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2840", "Disp_Access_No" : "1922.20", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Basket", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Puyallup", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Puyallup", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 1/4 x 8 3/4 x 10 3/4 in. (23.5 x 22.2 x 27.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "8 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Bark", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Cherry bark fibers", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Originally known as the S'Puyalupubsh, the Puyallup Tribe is part of the Salish speaking people of the Pacific Northwest. Living along the shores of Puget Sound, their basket-making abilities are well-respected and tout a great variety of types and construction techniques. The Salish made baskets for cooking, storage, and sale to non-Native collectors. This example combines both geometric and human forms. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Henry A. Strong", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Basketry", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.20_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.20_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.20_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.20_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25808", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2597, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2597", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.140", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Jar (Olla)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Santo Domingo Pueblo", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Santo Domingo Pueblo", "Disp_Dimen" : "15 x 15 1/2 x 15 1/2 in. (38.1 x 39.4 x 39.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "15 in.", "Disp_Width" : "15 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "One of the largest of the Northern pueblos, Santo Domingo is between Santa Fe and Albuquerque. The pottery produced there is distinguished by its cream slip base and dark black geometric designs, with particular attention paid to the negative spaces. The local clay is quite elastic and lends itself easily to large forms. This piece presents the hallmarks of an elegant and solid figure, rolled-out rim, small neck and gracefully tapered bottom. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harris K. Prior", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.140_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.140_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.140_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.140_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25823", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2886, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2886", "Disp_Access_No" : "1968.35", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Chilkat Robe (Naaxéin)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Tlingit", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Tlingit", "Disp_Dimen" : "52 3/4 x 62 1/2 in. (134 x 158.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "52 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "62 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wool", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wool, cedar bark, natural dyes", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Living along the Chilkat River of Southern Alaska, the Chilkat people are a single kwan, or geographical grouping, of the larger Tlingit culture. Male and female clan leaders honor their ancestors, both human and animal, by wearing Chilkat robes at festivals called potlatches and other important events. The Chilkat robe (or naaxéin) is a woven ceremonial cape traditionally worn and danced by the chief and other important members of Tlingit society. When danced, the motions of the performer include the dramatic manipulation of the long fringe, further enlivening the animal forms on the robe. The patterns on Chilkat robes represent animals important to Tlingit clans. These designs manipulate and rearrange specific animal forms, often adding additional faces and multiple eyes. This Chilkat robe features a diving humpback whale in the center panel. The whale is pictured both from above and in profile. Seated ravens shown in profile fill the two side panels of the robe. The arrangement of the overall design takes into account the position of these individual components when the robe is worn. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of a Friend of the Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Textiles", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "May represent a diving whale. See photocopies in curatorial file.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/68.35_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/68.35_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/68.35_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/68.35_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28360", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/68.35_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/68.35_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/68.35_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/68.35_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28361", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Detail of center panel. On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/68.35_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/68.35_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/68.35_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/68.35_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28362", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Detail of left panel. On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/68.35_A5.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/68.35_A5.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/68.35_A5.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/68.35_A5.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28363", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Detail of right panel. On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/68.35_A6.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/68.35_A6.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/68.35_A6.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/68.35_A6.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28364", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Detail of left half of center panel. On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/68.35_A7.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/68.35_A7.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/68.35_A7.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/68.35_A7.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28365", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Detail of right half of center panel. On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2818, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2818", "Disp_Access_No" : "1922.5", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Shaman Medicine Charm", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Tlingit", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Tlingit", "Disp_Dimen" : "6 1/4 x 2 1/4 in. (15.9 x 5.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "6 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Walrus ivory", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Walrus ivory", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The belief that humans can draw power from the non-human world is a framework that underlies many belief systems, and is especially strong in most Native North American culture groups. Shamans played an especially important role in this respect. Responsible for curing the sick, controlling the weather, guaranteeing successful fish runs, combating witches, and providing assistance during battle, shamans moved freely between the human and spirit world. Tlingit shamans often carried charms like this one. Each charm is unique and often includes a multiplicity of figures. This charm is in the form of a whale, with the rear assuming the form of a land otter, a highly powerful spirit helper to the shaman. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Henry A. Strong", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.5_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.5_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.5_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.5_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "15069", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.5_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.5_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.5_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.5_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25805", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2600, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2600", "Disp_Access_No" : "1978.44", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1860-1930", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1860", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1930", "Disp_Title" : "Jar (Olla)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Zia Pueblo", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Zia Pueblo", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 1/4 x 13 1/2 in. (28.6 x 34.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "13 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Terracotta", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Terracotta and mineral paints", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Resistant to the pressures of fashion, the Zia design vocabulary has changed little in over a hundred years. These decorative compositions often consist of a mix of geometric forms, rainbow bands (shown here encircling the neck), floral designs and references to bird imagery. Note the abstracted feather design repeated within several circles around the jar. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of a Friend of the Gallery in memory of Hildegarde Lasell Watson", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/78.44_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/78.44_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/78.44_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/78.44_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25826", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/78.44_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/78.44_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/78.44_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/78.44_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25827", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2598, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2598", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.141", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1860-1900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1860", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1900", "Disp_Title" : "Jar (Olla)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Zuni Pueblo", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Zuni Pueblo", "Disp_Dimen" : "8 7/8 x 13 3/4 in. (22.5 x 35 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "8 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "13 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay and mineral paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Focusing more on design motifs and less on symmetry of form, a Zuni jar often combines lyrical figures with geometric abstractions. This jar depicts a distinctive Zuni design, a painting of a deer with a heart-line: a red arrow of life or breath that extends from its mouth to its chest. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harris K. Prior", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.141_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.141_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.141_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.141_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25824", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.141_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.141_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.141_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.141_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25825", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2588, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2588", "Disp_Access_No" : "1935.11", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Jar (Olla)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Zuni Pueblo", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Zuni Pueblo", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 1/4 x 12 in. (23.5 x 30.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "12 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay and mineral paints", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Characteristic features of Zuni pottery are: areas of parallel lines (hatching), stylized birds, and a large rosette. The line break, which is the space left by the incomplete circular painted border that separates the upper and lower sections of the jar, is called by the Zuni onane, or “road.” It is thought to represent the life of the pottery painter herself, and must be left unfinished. It may also refer to the sipapu, or mythic place of emergence from the underworld. Traditionally it is the first painted line applied to the vessel. [Gallery label text, 1998]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. George B. Penny", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/35.11_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/35.11_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/35.11_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/35.11_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25818", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/35.11_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/35.11_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/35.11_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/35.11_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25819", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }