{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 4798, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4798", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.13", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1910-1914", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1910", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1914", "Disp_Title" : "Veranda Post", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Olowe of Ise", "Sort_Artist" : "Ise, Olowe of", "Disp_Dimen" : "56 x 132 x 10 in. (142.2 x 335.3 x 25.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "56 in.", "Disp_Width" : "132 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "maximum", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "A royal wife stands with her hands resting on the heads of her twin daughters who hold their breasts in a Yoruba gesture of greeting, devotion and humility. This post was carved to decorate a courtyard veranda in the palace of the Ogoga of Ikere, one of the kings of Yorubaland. The courtyard served as an official area where the king received important visitors and conducted affairs of state. It was important that he show off his wealth, power and sophistication in this space. This veranda post was carved by one of the most renowned sculptors in Africa, Olowe of Ise. His sculptures were so beautiful that some people believed Olowe harnessed the power of spirits who carved for him. Elaborate hairstyles and scarification patterns (look at the royal wife’s back) demonstrate Olowe’s technical mastery and reflect Yoruba standards of beauty. Traces of layered pigments indicate that these were once brightly painted and regularly refurbished. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Nigerian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "The piece was still in situ until at least 1964 (see photo in situ in 1998 "Olowe of Ise" exhibition brochure in curatorial file).", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.13_A6.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.13_A6.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.13_A6.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.13_A6.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "38870", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Scanned from transparency and background masked out by Andy Olenick.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7404, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7404", "Disp_Access_No" : "1972.53", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Face Mask with Hinged Jaw (Elu)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Ogoni", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Ogoni", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 1/2 x 4 3/4 x 4 5/8 in. (19.1 x 12.1 x 11.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment and fiber", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The white face of this Ogoni mask is associated with the youthfulness of benevolent spirits. As positive forces, elu are entertainers and are performed by young men on multiple occasions throughout the year. These unusually small masks perch on the front of the dancer’s face attached to a woven head piece. The mask is further animated when the dancer, clenching in his teeth a stick attached to its back, opens and closes the hinged jaw. The bowler hat is typical of this type of mask, as elu often depict hairstyles and fashions current at the time. In the early 20th century when this mask was carved, the Ogoni were involved in trading palm oil (for cooking) and gained exposure to this European style. These bowler hats became desirable prestige items for the Ogoni. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Nigerian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/72.53_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/72.53_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/72.53_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/72.53_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25522", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/72.53_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/72.53_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/72.53_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/72.53_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25521", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7424, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7424", "Disp_Access_No" : "1965.9.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Twin Figure (Ere Ibeji)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Yoruba", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Yoruba", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 1/4 x 2 5/8 x 2 5/8 in. (23.5 x 6.7 x 6.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment, beads, cowrie shells, fiber, sacrificial materials", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Yoruba have one of the highest rates of twinning in the world. Twins are endowed with powerful attributes, both auspicious and dangerous. Due to the high mortality rate of twins, when one or both dies, Yoruba mothers procure small wooden statues (ere ibeji) to house the spirits of the deceased. If there is a single ibeji, it is likely that one twin died and one survived. If there are two ibeji figures, then it is likely that both twins died. Wealthy women clothe their ere ibeji in beaded or shelled vests. Surface accumulation and signs of wear are common as ibeji figures are cared for in the same manner as a living child and are handled, clothed, washed, fed and honored with dances and songs. Lyrics from a Yoruba song explain how the care of ere ibeji can control the potentially negative influence of twins’ spirits, “Abuse me and I shall follow you home. Praise me and I shall leave you alone.” Subsequent generations inherit the care of ere ibeji from their ancestors. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Nigerian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.2_A7.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.2_A7.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.2_A7.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.2_A7.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25509", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.2_A8.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.2_A8.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.2_A8.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.2_A8.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25510", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25511", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7422, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7422", "Disp_Access_No" : "1965.9.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Twin Figure (Ere Ibeji)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Yoruba", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Yoruba", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 3/8 x 2 5/8 x 2 3/4 in. (23.8 x 6.7 x 7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment, beads, cowrie shells, fiber, sacrificial materials", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Yoruba have one of the highest rates of twinning in the world. Twins are endowed with powerful attributes, both auspicious and dangerous. Due to the high mortality rate of twins, when one or both dies, Yoruba mothers procure small wooden statues (ere ibeji) to house the spirits of the deceased. If there is a single ibeji, it is likely that one twin died and one survived. If there are two ibeji figures, then it is likely that both twins died. Wealthy women clothe their ere ibeji in beaded or shelled vests. Surface accumulation and signs of wear are common as ibeji figures are cared for in the same manner as a living child and are handled, clothed, washed, fed and honored with dances and songs. Lyrics from a Yoruba song explain how the care of ere ibeji can control the potentially negative influence of twins’ spirits, “Abuse me and I shall follow you home. Praise me and I shall leave you alone.” Subsequent generations inherit the care of ere ibeji from their ancestors. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Nigerian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.1_A5.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.1_A5.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.1_A5.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.1_A5.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25506", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.1_A6.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.1_A6.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.1_A6.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.1_A6.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25507", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.9.1-.2_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25508", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }