{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 1764, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1764", "Disp_Access_No" : "1940.27", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1913", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1913", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1913", "Disp_Title" : "New York Sky Line, Dark Buildings", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Childe Hassam", "Sort_Artist" : "Hassam, Childe", "Disp_Dimen" : "13 3/4 x 7 3/4 in. (34.9 x 19.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "13 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Childe Hassam drew this 1913 profile of the New York City skyline the year construction on the Woolworth Building was completed. At 57 stories, it was the tallest building in the world until the Chrysler Building was completed in 1930. Perhaps it was excitement with the new engineering and construction technologies that led Hassam to exert artistic license in his depiction of the building’s silhouette, thereby dramatizing its height. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Maud Hassam", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/40.27_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/40.27_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/40.27_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/40.27_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "37616", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 436, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/436", "Disp_Access_No" : "1963.27", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1904", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1904", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1904", "Disp_Title" : "The Bathers", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Childe Hassam", "Sort_Artist" : "Hassam, Childe", "Disp_Dimen" : "48 3/16 x 148 1/4 in. (122.4 x 376.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "48 3/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "148 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This painting hung originally in the home of C.E.S. Wood, a Portland, Oregon lawyer, writer and art collector. Murals were a common feature of turn-of-the-20th-century interiors, as they complemented the unified design popularized by artists and designers like William Morris and Gustav Stickley. Monumental buildings like the Boston Public Library as well as cozy residential bungalows were decorated by artists who covered blank walls with colorful, imaginative, and romantic scenes like The Bathers. MAG’s painting by Impressionist painter Childe Hassam was installed as part of a larger mural in the library/studio of the Portland, Oregon, home of Charles Erskine Scott Wood. A lawyer, writer, connoisseur, and friend of Hassam, Wood was influenced by the late 19th century Arts & Crafts aesthetic that disdained the ornate and cluttered surroundings of the Victorian period and aspired to simplicity and harmonious design. Wood wrote to his friend, the artist J. Alden Weir, that Hassam “whirled in and painted me a whole wall for my studio, and they tell me it is beautiful.” [Gallery label text, 2008] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Ogden Phipps", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "There are a number of descendants of C.E.S. Wood, who commissioned this painting from Hassam. In October 2008 Marjorie Searl spoke with Nancy Robinson von Gimbut, a greatgranddaughter of C.E.S. Wood. She was born in Rochester and lived on Fonthill Road in Brighton. Her father was David Robinson, who was born in England and was in the Air Service. Her email address is nvongimbut@yahoo.com", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/63.27_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/63.27_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/63.27_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/63.27_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12414", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }