{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 5271, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5271", "Disp_Access_No" : "1972.8", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 500-800", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "500", "_Disp_End_Date" : "800", "Disp_Title" : "Jar with Reptile Heads", "Alt_Title" : "Pot with Double-Headed Lizards", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Atlantic Watershed", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Atlantic Watershed", "Disp_Dimen" : "5 15/16 x 11 x 7 1/2 in. (15.1 x 28 x 19 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "5 15/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "11 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Blackware", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Blackware", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This pot originates from the mountainous region of central Costa Rica. Painted with black-slip, the vessel was then decorated with incised marks made after firing. The two lizard heads serve both as handles and as a visual metaphor for the concept of dualism. This deeply-rooted artistic convention often depicts objects in pairs to represent the fundamental complexities of life and death. A central component of many societies in the Ancient Americas, symbolic dualism seeks to balance the opposing manifestations of male and female, left and right, light and dark, and night and day. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Costa Rican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "El Rio applique and Belen incised styles", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/72.8_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/72.8_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/72.8_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/72.8_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20190", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5534, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5534", "Disp_Access_No" : "1969.56", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 800-1525", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "800", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1525", "Disp_Title" : "Shaman Figure (Sukia)", "Alt_Title" : "Shaman Smoking a Cigar", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Atlantic Watershed", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Atlantic Watershed", "Disp_Dimen" : "4 1/4 x 2 x 4 in. (10.8 x 5.1 x 10.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "4 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Stone", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Volcanic stone", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This seated shaman figure is a standard type that was produced in great quantities in central Costa Rica. Carved from volcanic stone these figures were included in burials, and perhaps made initially for domestic use. Hallucinogenic drugs, derived from native plants and animals, played a large role in this culture. Shown deep in a trance, the shaman here is most likely either inhaling or expelling a narcotic. He wears no earthly clothing or jewelry and there is no visible body modification, as he is both of this world and the world beyond. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Henry Buxbaum", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Costa Rican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.56_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.56_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.56_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.56_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20178", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }