{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 4900, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4900", "Disp_Access_No" : "1962.24", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Stool", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Asante", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Asante", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 3/4 x 18 x 9 in. (27.3 x 45.7 x 22.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "18 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In many African cultures, objects (such as carved figures and masks) can act as physical surrogates for spirits wishing to communicate and interact with the living. Stools are central objects in Asante spirituality. The Asante believe the stool used in life houses the owner’s soul in death. This is based in the story of The Golden Stool that descended from the heavens to land in (and thereby legitimize) the lap of the first Asante king. The Asante saying goes, “A man with no stool is a man with no dignity.” [Gallery label text, 2009] The treatment of stools as sacred objects is unique to the Asante kingdom - an Akan empire founded by the great leader Osei Tutu in the late seventeenth century. The tradition began with the great Golden Stool which legend relates floated down from the sky and fell in the lap of Osei Tutu. To this day, the Golden Stool stands as a representation of the soul, or spirit (sunsum) of the Asante people. It is not a throne, but rather a powerful, sacred object, that is guarded by each successive king and forbidden to be sat upon or to touch the ground. The most lavish stools are rewarded to important chiefs or members of the royal court, but commoners also maintain more modest stools. The stool is said to absorb some of the sunsum, or spirit, of his owner. Such an intimate link between owner and stool is reflected in the treatment of the stool after the owner's death. A high official's stool is linked to his role in office and when the owner dies, it is said that "a stool has fallen." The stool is then "blackened" and kept on its side in a separate "stool room." The soul of the ancestor is said to be embodied in the blackened stool. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Anonymous gift", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Ghanaian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/62.24_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/62.24_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/62.24_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/62.24_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25502", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7867, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7867", "Disp_Access_No" : "1953.31", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Ceremonial Canoe Paddle", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Austral Islander", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Austral Islander", "Disp_Dimen" : "41 1/4 x 9 in. (104.8 x 22.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "41 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Based on the size and intricately carved surface it is unlikely that this was ever used as a canoe paddle. Although knowledge of their original function is lost, it is believed that paddles like this may have been used to accentuate a dancer’s movements during ritual performances. By the late 19th century Austral artists recognized Westerners’ interest in the paddles fine carving and craftsmanship and began making them for the market. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Anonymous gift", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Austral Islander", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.31_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.31_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.31_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.31_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31027", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4889, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4889", "Disp_Access_No" : "1964.111", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "mid 19th century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1833", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1866", "Disp_Title" : "Raven Dance Mask", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Kwakwaka'wakw", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Kwakwaka'wakw", "Disp_Dimen" : "56 in. (142.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "56 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood, pigment", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment, cedar bark", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This mask represents Raven, one of the creatures most important to the Kwakwaka’wakw people. Known to be quick learners, aggressive defenders of territory, and very social with one another, ravens have been a respected clan emblem for centuries. Raven masks are worn during a portion of the hamatsa, an initiation masquerade for young men. Following a choreographed sequence, with beaks projecting upward and masks moving wildly from side to side, the hinged lower jaw of the mask is manipulated with a cord. When the cord is pulled, the mask responds with a loud clacking sound – the “hap, hap” of the birds’ voices – adding to the dramatic effect of the performance. Hamatsa is performed at Kwakwaka’wakw potlatches. Potlatches are traditional cross-clan celebrations including dancing, feasting and magnanimous distribution of gifts held to honor births, marriages, deaths and other changes in social relationships. Potlatches continue to this day, despite attempts to ban them by both the Canadian and United States governments in the late 19th century. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Native Canadian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/64.111_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/64.111_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/64.111_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/64.111_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "19265", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7389, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7389", "Disp_Access_No" : "1953.75.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Heddle Pulley", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Guro", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Guro", "Disp_Dimen" : "8 3/8 in. (21.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "8 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Hand looms are traditionally used by West African men in weaving narrow-strips of cloth. While the heddle pulley is a crucial functional element of the loom, the elaborately carved figure is not. These decorative figures, which fell out of fashion at the end of the last century, were made beautiful simply for the delight and pleasure of the weaver. The human compulsion to beautify functional objects is explained simply by a Guro artist who said, “We cannot live without such beautiful things.” [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R. T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Ivoirian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.75.2_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.75.2_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.75.2_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.75.2_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25499", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.75.2_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.75.2_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.75.2_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.75.2_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25498", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.75.2_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.75.2_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.75.2_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.75.2_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25497", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7872, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7872", "Disp_Access_No" : "1967.38", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Stilt Step", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Marquesan", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Marquesan", "Disp_Dimen" : "12 1/2 x 2 3/4 x 3 3/4 in. (31.8 x 7 x 9.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "12 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Stilt steps such as this one were footrests for stilt walkers. They were lashed about two or three feet from the bottom of tall poles. Marquesan men performed on stilts for entertainment and ritual occasions. Accomplished stilt-walkers could perform somersaults and other acrobatics. Audiences placed wagers on races, mock battles and other competitions between opponents. The stocky figure is in the form of Tiki, known generally throughout Polynesia as the wise and potent creator of the human race. Shallow, carved lines recall the tattoos that beautify the bodies of Marquesan women and men. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "General Acquisitions Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Marquesan", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/67.38_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/67.38_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/67.38_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/67.38_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29785", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/67.38_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/67.38_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/67.38_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/67.38_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "29786", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }