{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 1050, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1050", "Disp_Access_No" : "1993.24", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "after 1855", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1856", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1865", "Disp_Title" : "Nydia, the Blind Flower Girl of Pompeii", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Randolph Rogers", "Sort_Artist" : "Rogers, Randolph", "Disp_Dimen" : "36 x 17 11/16 x 25 in. (91.5 x 45 x 63.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "36 in.", "Disp_Width" : "17 11/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Marble", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Marble", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Nydia, the blind heroine of Edward Bulwer-Lytton’s 1834 novel The Last Days of Pompeii, was the subject of over 50 sculptures by Randolph Rogers. He depicted her, a broken column at her feet, as she used her heightened sense of hearing to listen for Glaucus, the nobleman whom she loved, and his fiancée, Ione. Although Nydia led them to safety, in the end she drowned herself because Glaucus could not be hers. Nineteenth century collectors were fascinated by classical subjects like Pompeii. Many American collectors on the Grand Tour made trips to Italy, where they visited the studios of artists like Rogers and actively commissioned work. At left is a picture of MAG’s Nydia in an earlier collection in the home of Mr. and Mrs. W.W. Chapin, 110 South Fitzhugh Street, Rochester. [Gallery Label, February 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Mr. and Mrs. William Wisner Chapin lived at 110 South Fitzhugh Street. The home, originally built in 1830, was expanded with a music room, possibly designed by Andrew Jackson Warner, an architect who wrote an essay about the room for a small pamphlet entitled "The Pipe Organ in the Home of Mr. Chapin". The sculpture of Nydia now owned by the Memorial Art Gallery was located in the Chapins'' music room. MAG also has in its records a photograph of the sculpture in the music room. The home is no longer standing. ", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.24_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.24_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.24_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.24_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12520", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Master scan shows more of base of statue, although it is blocked by the color bar. Print master scan has color bar & base of statue cropped out.", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }