{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 192, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/192", "Disp_Access_No" : "1934.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "before 1831", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1821", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1830", "Disp_Title" : "Colonel Nathaniel Rochester", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, American", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, American", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 x 25 in. (76.2 x 63.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 in.", "Disp_Width" : "25 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This formal gentleman was the founder of the city of Rochester, New York. His portrait was originally thought to have been painted by John James Audubon, but current scholarship has weighed in against that opinion. Nathaniel Rochester was an enterprising individual, which was a characteristic of many early settlers. He founded businesses and churches, and held governmental positions. He was the first president of the Rochester Athenaeum, the precursor to the Rochester Institute of Technology, and he was instrumental in the organization of Monroe County and the building of the Erie Canal. His practical and inventive bent may have led him to wear four-lens spectacles, which allowed him to read small print and see at a distance using the same pair of glasses. [Gallery label text, 2007]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Thomas J. Watson", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Conversation between Marjorie Searl and Holly Cumberland (Rochester family descendant) regarding acquisition and attribution of painting (December 7, 2009); Holly wanted to alert us to the book "Nathaniel" written by her grandfather, Rochester Rogers, whose son Nathaniel died of throat cancer in 1945. In the book, Rogers alludes to the painting of Nathaniel Rochester, and that it was acquired for MAG by Thomas Watson. Holly''s contention is that Thomas Watson bought the painting believing that it was by Audubon, and that as Rochester Rogers and Thomas Watson were friends, there would have been ample opportunity for Watson to have ascertained from his friend Rogers that it was in fact by Audubon. However, as I explained to Holly, it was Rochester Rogers'' sister Helen who strongly supported the Audubon attribution, so this comment does not change the fact that there is virtually no objective and external evidence pointing to this portrait''s being by Audubon, other than an anonymous inscription on the back of the painting.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/34.1_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/34.1_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/34.1_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/34.1_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12350", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 228, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/228", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.47", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1846", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1846", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1846", "Disp_Title" : "The Indian Hunter", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "DeWitt Clinton Boutelle", "Sort_Artist" : "Boutelle, DeWitt Clinton", "Disp_Dimen" : "32 5/8 x 47 1/8 in. (82.9 x 119.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "32 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "47 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.47_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.47_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.47_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.47_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12494", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008. Needs curatorial approval for other uses. Color was adjusted closer to the scan in the Seeing America book...less yellow than Access image shown here.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 916, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/916", "Disp_Access_No" : "1963.8", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1870", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1865", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1875", "Disp_Title" : "Cigar Store Indian", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Thomas V. Brooks", "Sort_Artist" : "Brooks, Thomas V.", "Disp_Dimen" : "85 x 24 3/8 x 26 1/2 in. (215.9 x 61.9 x 67.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "85 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood and paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "If you approached 50 West Main Street in Rochester late in the 19th century, you would have seen this figure standing in front of the tobacco shop located there. So that no one would miss the point that tobacco products were sold inside, it was purchased to stand outside and advertise the shop’s wares. The carving included stylized tobacco leaves and a tobacco box held in the figure’s outstretched right hand. Carvers capitalized early on the relationship between Native Americans and the tobacco that they grew for sacred practices. Carvings of Native Americans were used by the 18th century in British tobacco shops, reflecting the growth of the transatlantic trade. With laws restricting sidewalk signs, and the decline of tobacco shops due to public health awareness, the once-ubiquitous cigar store Indian has become a rarity. [Gallery label text, 2002]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/63.8_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/63.8_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/63.8_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/63.8_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12416", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/63.8_R2.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/63.8_R2.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/63.8_R2.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/63.8_R2.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "43078", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/63.8_R3.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/63.8_R3.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/63.8_R3.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/63.8_R3.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "43079", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/63.8_R4.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/63.8_R4.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/63.8_R4.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/63.8_R4.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "43080", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/63.8_R1.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/63.8_R1.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/63.8_R1.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/63.8_R1.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "43081", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 926, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/926", "Disp_Access_No" : "1988.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1984", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1984", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1984", "Disp_Title" : "Dr. Caligari", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Wendell Castle", "Sort_Artist" : "Castle, Wendell", "Disp_Dimen" : "92 1/2 x 31 1/2 x 26 1/2 in. (235 x 80 x 67.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "92 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "31 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Curly cherry veneer, ebony and gold-plated brass", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Curly cherry veneer, ebony and gold-plated brass", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Dr. Caligari is among a series of thirteen clocks that Wendell Castle created in the 1980s. He made them at the suggestion of his dealer, who urged him to create a body of work that would challenge the critics’ association of Castle with functional furniture. Castle was particularly interested in the concept of time, and Dr. Caligari is a fanciful exploration of time travel. Its tall case is rich with connections to traditional grandfather clocks. It suggests either a trip to the past in an ancient obelisk, or to the future, in a rocket ship. The title of the work was inspired by the angular set design of the 1920 German Expressionist film, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. The clock’s painted interior was intended to suggest the silent horror film’s unsettling mood. Castle and his longtime associate Don Sottile developed a smearing technique using India ink over gesso that gave the painted finish its distinctive feathered edges. [Summer 2015]", "Dedication" : "Given in honor of Joan M. Vanden Brul by her family", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/88.1_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/88.1_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/88.1_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/88.1_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "38877", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Scanned from transparency, clock silhouetted out from background by Andy Olenick", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 352, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/352", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.5", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1860", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1860", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1860", "Disp_Title" : "Genesee Oaks", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Asher Brown Durand", "Sort_Artist" : "Durand, Asher Brown", "Disp_Dimen" : "28 1/4 x 42 in. (71.8 x 106.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "28 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "42 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Asher B. Durand was commissioned to paint this magnificent vista overlooking the Genesee River Valley in Geneseo, New York, by a member of the Wadsworth family, the village founders. At one time, they owned all the land from Geneseo to Rochester. [Gallery label text, 2007] No matter what the weather, this view across the Genesee Valley near Geneseo is as breathtaking now as it was over two hundred years ago, when landowner James S. Wadsworth commissioned Hudson River school founder Asher B. Durand to record the beauty of the landscape in a painting. In the summer of 1859, Durand traveled from New York City to the Genesee Valley to make preparatory sketches. Trained as an engraver, he recorded many of the details that he saw, but in addition, his personal belief in the immanence of the divine in the natural world motivated him to present a landscape that seems to extend infinitely. Statuesque oak trees, many of which are still standing on the land, dominate the painting. In this region, the trees were more than a decorative feature. When the Wadsworths began to sell and lease land to local farmers, they included a clause in the contract requiring that a number of trees remain after the land was cleared. This was a holdover from British husbandry; the result was a countryside that was not only beautiful but that provided sun and moisture control for humans and animals alike. Genesee Oaks was Durand's tribute to the splendor of this valley. [Gallery label text] Durand visited the Genesee country but once, sketching in the Geneseo area during late June and July of 1859. Of his trip he wrote to his son in August: "With all my troubles I believe I have learnt more about the management of colors in the painting of trees than by all my previous practice, altho' I have never produced so little in the same span of time, not having made but four studies in five weeks." During the following year, back in his studio, Durand painted Genesee Oaks, based on the sketches he had made. The painting was commissioned by James Samuel Wadsworth, a local squire, who owned the work when it was exhibited at the National Academy of Design in 1861. Seven oil studies done near Geneseo in 1859 are photographed in Durand's studio after 1878. A photograph shows three small sculptures of cows, two standing, one reclining that may have served as models for the animals in the painting. Howard S. Merritt Peters, Susan Dodge, ed. Memorial Art Gallery: An Introduction to the Collection. (Rochester, NY: The Memorial Art Gallery, 1988). p.182-3.", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Women's Council in honor of Harris K. Prior", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.5_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.5_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.5_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.5_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12463", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 391, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/391", "Disp_Access_No" : "1942.45", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1850-1860", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1850", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1860", "Disp_Title" : "Portrait of Sophia Josephine Dixon", "Alt_Title" : "Mrs. Robert Fulton White", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Jefferson Gauntt", "Sort_Artist" : "Gauntt, Jefferson", "Disp_Dimen" : "50 1/4 x 40 1/8 in. (127.6 x 101.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "50 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "40 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Attributed to Jefferson Gauntt American, 1806 – 1864 Sophia Josephine Dixon, born circa 1852 - date of death unknown Hiram, Angeline and daughter, Sophia Josephine Dixon portraits are not signed or dated. We believe all three were painted by the same artist, Jefferson Gauntt. The Dixon family’s life dates have been obtained through research. Based on these dates we speculate the portraits were painted between 1840 and 1860. Tombstone, Oct. 2010, Colleen Piccone A favorite of MAG visitors, the portrait of Sophia Josephine Dixon was conserved in 2006 through a Lower Hudson Conference Conservation Treatment Grant and has been on view in the 19th century American gallery. We are happy to reunite her with her parents, Hiram and Angeline Dixon, whose portraits were conserved in 2008 through the Henry Luce Foundation American Art Conservation Grant. This is the first time that MAG has exhibited the portraits together as a family. They were given to the Gallery by Sophia Josephine’s daughter, Mrs. George B. Penny. The Dixons’ daughter, Sophia Josephine, holds her pet goldfinch on a string, illustrating her patience and nurturing nature in training a wild bird as her pet. Her white dress with blue ribbon sash, lace pantaloons and straw hat are those of a well-bred young girl from a successful American family. In the early nineteenth century, girls were generally depicted in domestic settings. By 1831, however, “The Mother’s Book” by Lydia Child argued that girls as well as boys would benefit from open air and should be allowed to play outside. The Dixon family lived north of New York City, first in Hudson, NY and then in Tarrytown, NY. Excerpted from installation text, Oct. 2010 Colleen Piccone, Curatorial Dept. ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. George Barlow Penny", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Related_Parent" : [ { "Rel_Obj_ID" : "392", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Portrait of Angeline Wildey Dixon (1817 - 1903)" } ], "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/42.45_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/42.45_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/42.45_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/42.45_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12363", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 614, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/614", "Disp_Access_No" : "1978.189", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1835-1836", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1835", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1836", "Disp_Title" : "Pierrepont Edward Lacey (1832 - after 1860) and His Dog, Gun", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Milton W. Hopkins", "Sort_Artist" : "Hopkins, Milton W.", "Disp_Dimen" : "42 x 30 1/8 in. (106.7 x 76.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "42 in.", "Disp_Width" : "30 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Lacey family lived and farmed in Scottsville, New York, a small village south of Rochester on the Oatka Creek. Like many families of means, they used the services of a local artist to have their likenesses painted, since photography as we know it did not exist. For many years, this artist was thought to be Noah North, but recent scholarship points to Milton Hopkins, with whom North probably apprenticed. Painting was not Hopkins' sole occupation. As well, he farmed and was a carriage and sign painter, and was involved in anti-Masonic, abolitionist, and temperance politics. Pierrepont Lacey was born in 1832, and like many little boys, he probably was not comfortable posing for a painting in his best clothes. The family dog, Gun, most likely didn't stand still for long, either, so it may have been quite a challenge for the artist to capture the likenesses of boy and dog. When Pierrepont was fifteen, his family moved to Marshall, Michigan. He grew up, married, and was the father of one son. Milton Hopkins moved to Ohio shortly after this portrait was painted, where he continued to paint portraits and work for the Underground Railroad. [Gallery label text, 2000] Like many young boys, Pierrepont Lacey was probably not comfortable posing for a painting dressed in his best suit and red shoes. Gun, the family dog, was most likely a restless subject for the artist to capture, as well. There are six known portraits by Hopkins showing children dressed in their finest clothes, often accompanied by their dogs. All of the children’s parents were connected to the artist through their activities in anti-Masonic, abolitionist, and temperance politics. MAG’s nearly full-size portrait is one of the most engaging likenesses done by Hopkins and has become an American folk art icon. [Excerpted from gallery label text, Oct. 2011, Colleen Piccone, Curatorial] The Lacey family, whose portraits are on view nearby, lived in this home at 9 Scottsville-Chili Road in Scottsville, New York in the 1830s, where it is believed their portraits were painted and first hung. Two children in this 1890s photograph were relatives of the Lacey family. The girl on the far left was Ruth Hanford (Munn), in whose memory the portraits were given to the Memorial Art Gallery. The paintings were passed down through the generations in this family home until 1932, when they were presented on the occasion of a marriage and moved to a new home in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In 1978, the generous owners donated the group of family heirlooms to the Memorial Art Gallery, to be enjoyed by its many visitors. [Excerpted from gallery text panel, Oct. 2011, Colleen Piccone, Curatorial}] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Dunn in memory of Ruth Hanford Munn and James Buell Munn", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Related_Sibling" : [ { "Rel_Obj_ID" : "612", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Ann Gennett Pixley Lacey (1809 - 1841)" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "613", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Eliza Pixley Lacey (1834 - 1839)" } ], "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/78.189_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/78.189_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/78.189_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/78.189_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12478", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/78.187-191_R1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/78.187-191_R1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/78.187-191_R1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/78.187-191_R1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "18242", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Also on CD, the 2 images from which the restored image was created: Lacey House Scottsville A.tif (78.187-191_R2.tif on print master folder), and Lacey House Scottsville B.tif (78.187-191_R3.tif).", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 635, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/635", "Disp_Access_No" : "1965.3", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "after 1890", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1891", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1900", "Disp_Title" : "Articles Hung on a Door", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Frederick Peto", "Sort_Artist" : "Peto, John Frederick", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 x 21 3/4 in. (76.2 x 55.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 in.", "Disp_Width" : "21 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.3_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.3_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.3_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.3_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12427", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4812, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4812", "Disp_Access_No" : "1968.102", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1795", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1790", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1800", "Disp_Title" : "Lieutenant-Colonel Hay MacDowell", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Sir Henry Raeburn", "Sort_Artist" : "Raeburn, Henry", "Disp_Dimen" : "93 x 58 in. (236.2 x 147.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "93 in.", "Disp_Width" : "58 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Raeburn may have made this painting to commemorate General Hay MacDowell’s 1795 departure from the 57th Regiment of Foot, with which he had served for five years. He would go on to be named commander of the British forces in Madras, India. The low perspective of the life-sized canvas elevates MacDowell to the status of a hero, while the vivid colors provide animation to an otherwise-static pose. The use of these simple devices to create a monumental effect helps to explain why Raeburn, who had no formal training as an artist, was the preeminent portraitist in Scotland in the late 1700s and early 1800s. [Gallery label text, 2008]", "Dedication" : "George Eastman Collection of the University of Rochester", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Scottish", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Related_Children" : [ ], "Curator" : "An identical portrait is held at the Iziko Museums of Cape Town, South Africa.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/68.102_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/68.102_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/68.102_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/68.102_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "38868", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Photographed in situ as installed; frame cropped out in Photoshop.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 710, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/710", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.139", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1866", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1866", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1866", "Disp_Title" : "Home Late", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Mortimer Smith", "Sort_Artist" : "Smith, Mortimer", "Disp_Dimen" : "40 x 46 in. (101.6 x 116.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "40 in.", "Disp_Width" : "46 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Home Late is the earliest identified painting by Mortimer Smith. The shadowy interior of the frontier cabin demonstrates his mastery of the genre scene: the rifle hanging from the ceiling side by side with drying meats and vegetables, supper cooking in the kettle suspended in the stone fireplace, and the dog sleeping peacefully by the fire. Smith is equally adept at capturing the warm glow cast by the fire as it contrasts with the cold light of the winter scene beyond the doorway. The child pausing in the doorway heightens the emotional ambiguity of the scene as he surveys the cabin's interior, perhaps to gauge the mood within as he returns home late from skating. Smith's landscape and genre scenes suggest familiarity with his better-known contemporaries, like Albert Bierstadt and Eastman Johnson. Certainly, early exposure to the work exhibited at the Cosmopolitan Art Association in Sandusky provided Smith with models of painting styles that continued to influence him throughout his life. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.139_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.139_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.139_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.139_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "31885", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "cropped from CMYK file used in Seeing America Catalogue for web use", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 811, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/811", "Disp_Access_No" : "1977.196", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "after 1851", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1852", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1861", "Disp_Title" : "American Harvesting (after Jasper Cropsey)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, American", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, American", "Disp_Dimen" : "32 1/2 x 44 1/4 in. (82.6 x 112.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "32 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "44 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "While we may not know who painted this work, we can trace its inspiration. In 1851 Jasper Cropsey's painting American Harvesting was in the American Art-Union's annual exhibition in New York. The American Art-Union, formed in 1844, promoted American artists by purchasing and exhibiting their works. To familiarize more Americans with these artists, engravings were made and distributed to members. Possibly, one of these engravings was owned by the artist who did the Gallery's painting. Several other versions of this work exist and were most likely inspired by the same print. A version of the this image was printed by Currier & Ives, entitled 'A Summer Landscape: Haymaking." Cropsey's painting is currently in the collection of the <a href="http://www.artmuseum.iu.edu">Indiana University Art Museum</a>. [Gallery label text, 2002]", "Dedication" : "Anonymous gift", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/77.196_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/77.196_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/77.196_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/77.196_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "13420", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/77.196_R1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/77.196_R1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/77.196_R1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/77.196_R1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "21368", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Image of American Harvesting in the collection of the Indiana University Art Museum. Approved by IUAM to go on our website as a detail image", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1123, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1123", "Disp_Access_No" : "1976.7a-b", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Weathervane: Aurora in a Cunningham Carriage", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, American", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, American", "Disp_Dimen" : "31 1/2 x 40 in. (80 x 101.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "31 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "40 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Metal", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Metal and paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Peter F. Cunningham", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "From the James Cunningham, Son and Company Carriage Manufactory", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/76.7_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/76.7_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/76.7_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/76.7_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "15077", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 773, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/773", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.13", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1859", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1859", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1859", "Disp_Title" : "View of the Pitkin House and East Avenue", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Charles Willson", "Sort_Artist" : "Willson, Charles", "Disp_Dimen" : "20 3/8 x 30 1/4 in. (51.8 x 76.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "20 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "30 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The building that currently is the Boy Scout headquarters – 474 East Avenue, near Prince Street – was formerly a private home. It was originally built for William Pitkin, a druggist who became banker, mayor of the city, and married Sophia Rochester, daughter of Rochester’s founder. After the Pitkins moved closer to downtown (legend says that Sophia missed living near her parents, who lived on Spring Street – East Avenue was considered out in the country in those days), the home became the residence of Daniel Powers, self-made millionaire. In 1906, a third story was added to the building. [Gallery label text, 2007] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Maurice R. Forman", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Also known as the Gilman Perkins House", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.13_R1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.13_R1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.13_R1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.13_R1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "17282", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "contemporary photography of scene", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.13_R2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.13_R2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.13_R2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.13_R2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "17283", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "contemporary photography of scene", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.13_R3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.13_R3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.13_R3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.13_R3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "17284", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "contemporary photography of scene", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.13_R4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.13_R4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.13_R4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.13_R4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "17285", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "contemporary photography of scene", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.13_R5.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.13_R5.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.13_R5.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.13_R5.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "17287", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "contemporary photography of scene", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.13_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.13_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.13_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.13_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20954", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }