{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 5208, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5208", "Disp_Access_No" : "1954.12", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1913", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1913", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1913", "Disp_Title" : "Still Life with Pipe (Nature morte à la Pipe)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Georges Braque", "Sort_Artist" : "Braque, Georges", "Disp_Dimen" : "16 x 13 in. (40.6 x 33 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "13 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "French", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/54.12_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/54.12_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/54.12_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/54.12_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "38867", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Photographed in situ as installed; frame cropped out in Photoshop.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3887, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3887", "Disp_Access_No" : "1998.77", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1950", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1945", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1955", "Disp_Title" : "The Admiral's Game", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Joseph Cornell", "Sort_Artist" : "Cornell, Joseph", "Disp_Dimen" : "12 x 18 x 4 in. (30.5 x 45.7 x 10.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "12 in.", "Disp_Width" : "18 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Mixed media", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Mixed media", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Romantic and enigmatic, Joseph Cornell’s boxes are filled with fragments of found materials. In The Admiral’s Game, the parallel rods that hold a pair of white balls might suggest a playful arcade game or the timeless and profound idea of an all-powerful creator setting the planets in motion. Cornell made his highly symbolic and mysterious creations at the home that he shared with his mother and brother in Queens, New York. While Cornell was reclusive and essentially an outsider in the art world, his work influenced many important American artists, including Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, and Marcel Duchamp. [Summer 2015]", "Dedication" : "Maurice R. and Maxine B. Forman Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/98.77_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/98.77_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/98.77_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/98.77_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "38880", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 333, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/333", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.3", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1931-1932", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1931", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1932", "Disp_Title" : "Landscape with Garage Lights", "Alt_Title" : "Garage Lights", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Stuart Davis", "Sort_Artist" : "Davis, Stuart", "Disp_Dimen" : "32 x 41 7/8 in. (81.3 x 106.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "32 in.", "Disp_Width" : "41 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Stuart Davis began as a student of the Urban Realist style, but upon seeing the many European modernist works on display at the New York Armory Show of 1913, the artist found his passion for abstraction. The influence of the broken-up and flattened surfaces of Cubism and the syncopated rhythms of American jazz contributed to Davis’ personal style. [Gallery label text, 2007] Gloucester, one of Massachusetts's oldest seaports, was a summer home for painter Stuart Davis from the time he was a young man of twenty-two. This view of the harbor clearly captivated him by the early 1930s, and preliminary studies of this painting reveal how carefully he considered the scene and translated it into paint, all the while deliberately conveying a sense of simplicity and speed in its execution. After a Parisian stay in the late 1920s, Davis returned to the United States with a new way of seeing things. The goal for him was to paint an expressive, abstracted version of the world around him, rather than a photographic simulacrum. As modernism challenged the nature of reality and how it is perceived, Davis reminds us here that it is possible to see two sides of a building at once, and that often it really looks like only half of a ship is in the water even though our brains convince us that the other half is hidden behind the fish warehouse. Flatness and simplification of forms were characteristics that distinguished work of influential European painters like Picasso and Matisse, whose work Davis would have encountered during his stay in France. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Related_Children" : [ { "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3088", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Study for "Landscape with Garage Lights"" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3089", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "From Sketchbook 3, Drawing for "Landscape with Garage Lights"" } ], "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.3_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.3_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.3_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.3_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12383", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.3_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.3_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.3_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.3_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "53893", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Rescanned transparency at larger size for reproduction. New JPG derived from that larger TIF.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 342, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/342", "Disp_Access_No" : "1987.62", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1938", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1938", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1938", "Disp_Title" : "Snow on Quai", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Edwin Dickinson", "Sort_Artist" : "Dickinson, Edwin", "Disp_Dimen" : "21 x 18 in. (53.3 x 45.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "21 in.", "Disp_Width" : "18 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Nancy Turner in memory of Richard Turner", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/87.62_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/87.62_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/87.62_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/87.62_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12507", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 348, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/348", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.4", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1938", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1938", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1938", "Disp_Title" : "Cars in a Sleet Storm", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Arthur Dove", "Sort_Artist" : "Dove, Arthur", "Disp_Dimen" : "15 x 21 in. (38.1 x 53.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "15 in.", "Disp_Width" : "21 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Painted in Geneva, NY, Cars in a Sleet Storm is representative of Arthur Dove’s personalized abstract vocabulary with which he responded to the world around him. Dove, along with Georgia O’Keeffe and Marsden Hartley, were members of a group of modernist American artists championed by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz in his 291 Gallery in Manhattan. [Gallery label text, 2007] Arthur G. Dove was a native of Geneva, New York, about 46 miles from Rochester. Early on, rural New York State did not satisfy Dove's desire for a more engaged artistic life, and a few years after the turn of the 20th century, he moved to New York City and then to Paris. On his return to the United States in 1910, he began to paint abstract landscapes, and is considered one of America's first abstract painters. Dove's work was actively exhibited by photographer Alfred Stieglitz in his Gallery 291 and Intimate Gallery, major centers of avant-garde art in the United States. Stieglitz also showed the work of Georgia O'Keeffe whom he married in 1924. Cars in a Sleet Storm was painted at the end of Dove's years in Geneva, where he had returned to manage his father's estate. Dove's own words align him with the 20th century movement away from identifiable subject matter:"I would like to make something that is real in itself, that does not remind anyone of any other thing, and that does not have to be explained like the letter A, for instance." He also commented, "… I no longer observed in the old way, and not only began to think subjectively but also to remember certain sensations purely through their form and color, that is, by certain shapes, planes of light, or character lines determined by the meeting of such planes." [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.4_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.4_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.4_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.4_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25276", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Scanned from 1999 James Via transparency", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.4_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.4_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.4_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.4_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41492", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Color-corrected and cropped from M1 file as no print master existed. JPG derived from new print master.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4510, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4510", "Disp_Access_No" : "2000.13", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2000", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2000", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2000", "Disp_Title" : "Nofreelunch Basket", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John McQueen", "Sort_Artist" : "McQueen, John", "Disp_Dimen" : "23 x 17 x 17 in. (58.4 x 43.2 x 43.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "23 in.", "Disp_Width" : "17 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Willow and waxed string", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Willow and waxed string", "Info_Page_Comm" : "John McQueen is credited with the contemporary revival of basketry, one of the most ancient crafts. He lives in Saratoga Springs, where he grows and gathers the natural materials that he incorporates into his works. In the Gallery’s piece, the artist has incorporated text into the body of the work. While three complete phrases can be decoded – A PIECE OF CAKE, MISSING THE BOAT, AND A PRIZE AT A PRICE – a sense of the fragmentary quality of individual words is created as each one is picked out. The negative space of the letters suggests the way in which words are openings for ideas, while the interlocked forms of the willow branches recall calligraphic forms. [Gallery label text, 2004] ", "Dedication" : "Maurice R. and Maxine B. Forman Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Basketry", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Top layer: Piece of Cake Middle layer: Missing the Boat Bottom layer: A Prize at a Price", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2000.13_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2000.13_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2000.13_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2000.13_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12341", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1025, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1025", "Disp_Access_No" : "1960.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1957", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1957", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1957", "Disp_Title" : "Calligraphics", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Isamu Noguchi", "Sort_Artist" : "Noguchi, Isamu", "Disp_Dimen" : "70 5/8 x 18 x 3 5/8 in. (179.4 x 45.7 x 9.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "70 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "18 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Iron, wood and rope", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Cast iron, wood and rope", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Isamu Noguchi’s father was a Japanese poet and his mother was an American writer. Although he was born in California and lived much of his life in the U.S., Noguchi’s travels reflected his own East-West duality. The artist spent his childhood traveling throughout Japan with his mother. As a young man he went to Paris to study with the abstract sculptor Constantin Brancusi. In China, he studied the ancient art of calligraphy. In the sleek, mid-century forms of Calligraphics, Noguchi combined his love of modern sculpture and calligraphy. The two shapes suggest abstract versions of Japanese characters: ni meaning “the sun” (like the red sun on the flag of Japan) and hon meaning “the origin” (perhaps his own). [Summer 2015]", "Dedication" : "R. T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Chiyo Ueyama notes that the sculpture suggests abstracted versions of the characters for "nihon," the Japanese name for Japan: the two characters translate to "the sun" (ni) and "the origin" (hon).", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/60.2_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/60.2_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/60.2_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/60.2_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12408", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 637, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/637", "Disp_Access_No" : "1986.132", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1973", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1973", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1973", "Disp_Title" : "The Beginning of the Fields", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Fairfield Porter", "Sort_Artist" : "Porter, Fairfield", "Disp_Dimen" : "52 x 76 1/8 in. (132.1 x 193.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "52 in.", "Disp_Width" : "76 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/86.132_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/86.132_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/86.132_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/86.132_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12499", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 707, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/707", "Disp_Access_No" : "1941.33", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1907", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1907", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1907", "Disp_Title" : "Election Night", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Sloan", "Sort_Artist" : "Sloan, John", "Disp_Dimen" : "26 3/8 x 32 1/4 in. (67 x 81.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "26 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "32 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This scene, nearly unintelligible in its crowding and confusion, is Sloan’s celebration of the furor of the city on election night. [Gallery label text, 2007] John Sloan met Robert Henri in Philadelphia, and from early on maintained a friendship and correspondence with him until Henri died in 1929. He moved to New York City at Henri’s urging. On November 5, 1907, he wrote: “Election Day… saw the noisy trumpet blowers, confetti throwers and the 'ticklers' in use - a small feather duster on a stick which is pushed in the face of each girl by the men, and in the face of men by the girls. A good humorous crowd, so dense in places that it was impossible to control one's movement.” The location, Herald Square at 34th and Broadway, was close by the New York Herald Building as well as Macy's. The elevated railroad tracks loomed overhead, increasing the suggestion of noise and activity in the scene. Sloan included Election Night as one of his entries in the 1908 exhibition at Macbeth Gallery. In his estimation, it was “…one of my best things. So that I felt happy in the evening, that good all over feeling that only comes from satisfaction in work - the real happiness, the joy of accomplishing or thinking that one has accomplished, which amounts to the same thing.” [Gallery label text, 2003]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/41.33_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/41.33_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/41.33_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/41.33_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12359", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008.", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }