{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 1116, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1116", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.9", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Santo (Crucifix)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, American", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, American", "Disp_Dimen" : "37 x 24 in. (94 x 61 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "37 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood and paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The image of Christ on the cross is fundamental to Christian belief and the art that expresses it. The nearby Tramp Art Shrine, made in the northeastern United States, as well as many European works on the second floor of the Gallery, incorporate images similar to this santo made by an unknown santero. Santero is the traditional name for the carver of santos, which are typically figures of Christ or saints. When European missionaries brought Catholicism across the ocean to the New World, they also brought with them traditional forms of religious iconography and woodcarving techniques. Spanish friars were the original santeros, carving the figures to decorate mission churches; during the 19th century, lay people became santeros, and santos became part of the domestic religious tradition. [Gallery label text, 2002]", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Women's Council in honor of Isabel C. Herdle", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "American, Southwest, possibly Franciscan", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.9_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.9_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.9_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.9_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "14242", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Temporary image. Reference only.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2818, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2818", "Disp_Access_No" : "1922.5", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Shaman Medicine Charm", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Tlingit", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Tlingit", "Disp_Dimen" : "6 1/4 x 2 1/4 in. (15.9 x 5.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "6 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Walrus ivory", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Walrus ivory", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The belief that humans can draw power from the non-human world is a framework that underlies many belief systems, and is especially strong in most Native North American culture groups. Shamans played an especially important role in this respect. Responsible for curing the sick, controlling the weather, guaranteeing successful fish runs, combating witches, and providing assistance during battle, shamans moved freely between the human and spirit world. Tlingit shamans often carried charms like this one. Each charm is unique and often includes a multiplicity of figures. This charm is in the form of a whale, with the rear assuming the form of a land otter, a highly powerful spirit helper to the shaman. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Henry A. Strong", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.5_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.5_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.5_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.5_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "15069", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.5_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.5_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.5_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.5_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25805", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4889, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4889", "Disp_Access_No" : "1964.111", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "mid 19th century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1833", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1866", "Disp_Title" : "Raven Dance Mask", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Kwakwaka'wakw", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Kwakwaka'wakw", "Disp_Dimen" : "56 in. (142.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "56 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood, pigment", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment, cedar bark", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This mask represents Raven, one of the creatures most important to the Kwakwaka’wakw people. Known to be quick learners, aggressive defenders of territory, and very social with one another, ravens have been a respected clan emblem for centuries. Raven masks are worn during a portion of the hamatsa, an initiation masquerade for young men. Following a choreographed sequence, with beaks projecting upward and masks moving wildly from side to side, the hinged lower jaw of the mask is manipulated with a cord. When the cord is pulled, the mask responds with a loud clacking sound – the “hap, hap” of the birds’ voices – adding to the dramatic effect of the performance. Hamatsa is performed at Kwakwaka’wakw potlatches. Potlatches are traditional cross-clan celebrations including dancing, feasting and magnanimous distribution of gifts held to honor births, marriages, deaths and other changes in social relationships. Potlatches continue to this day, despite attempts to ban them by both the Canadian and United States governments in the late 19th century. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Native Canadian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/64.111_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/64.111_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/64.111_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/64.111_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "19265", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 6429, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/6429", "Disp_Access_No" : "1951.58", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Seated Christ Icon", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Russian", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Russian", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 x 6 5/8 in. (22.9 x 16.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 in.", "Disp_Width" : "6 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Enamel", "Support" : "metal", "Disp_Medium" : "Enamel on bronze", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Estate of Emily and James Sibley Watson", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Enamels", "Creation_Place2" : "Russian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/51.58_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/51.58_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/51.58_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/51.58_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "24580", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7639, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7639", "Disp_Access_No" : "1994.53", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1860-1900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1860", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1900", "Disp_Title" : "Hanukkiah or Candelabra", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, German", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, German", "Disp_Dimen" : "26 1/4 x 23 1/2 x 9 3/4 in. (66.7 x 59.7 x 24.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "26 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "23 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Brass", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Brass", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Anonymous Gift", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Metalwork", "Creation_Place2" : "German", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Formerly T96-- source unknown, found in storage", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/94.53_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/94.53_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/94.53_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/94.53_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "16210", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14261, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14261", "Disp_Access_No" : "2006.51", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Torah shield (Tas)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, German", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, German", "Disp_Dimen" : "14 x 14 in. (35.6 x 35.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "14 in.", "Disp_Width" : "14 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Silver", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Gilt silver", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Memorial Art Gallery recently acquired several outstanding examples of Jewish ceremonial art from the collection of Central Synagogue, the oldest Jewish house of worship in continuous use in New York City. All seven objects were made in southern Germany, a region important for the production of silver as well as the original homeland for many of the early members of Central Synagogue’s congregation. These beautifully crafted works of art represent a range of ritual objects used in Jewish religious practice. The importance of beautifying such objects is eloquently captured in the principle of hiddur mitzvah. This expression, which literally means to beautify a commandment, is biblically grounded in Moses’ words following the Israelites’ escape from Egypt: “This is my God, and I will glorify Him.” (Exodus 15:2). The collection includes ritual objects related to the celebration of the Sabbath, the spiritual focus of Judaism: a pair of candlesticks, a Kiddush cup and two spice containers. These were once used in the home, as was the Hanukkiah, an oil lamp lit during the eight-day celebration of Hanukkah. Also included is a Tas, a decorative and functional object that originally ornamented the Torah in a synagogue. The Tas was designed to hang over the staves, or side rungs that hold the scrolls, on the outside of the Torah. An interchangeable plaque indicates the place to which the scrolls have been turned; here, the plaque refers to Yom Kippur, one of the holiest days in the Jewish liturgical calendar. [Adapted from gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Maurice R. and Maxine B. Forman Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Metalwork", "Creation_Place2" : "German", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "See biographical information on the Troper family, the donors to the Central Synagogue, in curatorial file. Mark appears to be R under a pomegranate, which is Augsburg 1765-67, but that does not match date of work per Central Synagogue", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2006.51_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2006.51_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2006.51_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2006.51_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "23251", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2006.51_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2006.51_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2006.51_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2006.51_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "23252", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2006.51_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2006.51_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2006.51_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2006.51_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "23253", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }