{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 5432, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5432", "Disp_Access_No" : "1978.138", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "200 BCE - 500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "200 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "500", "Disp_Title" : "Standing Dog Vessel", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Colima artist", "Sort_Artist" : "Colima artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 1/2 x 5 x 12 1/2 in. (19.1 x 12.7 x 31.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In nearly every world culture, dogs were the first domesticated animals. A large proportion of Colima tombs had actual dogs or dog-shaped vessels interred with the deceased. The frequently plump bodies of the dog vessels and their ubiquity in Colima tombs support different theories. Some scholars believe they represent a hairless breed of dog that was fattened and eaten at feasts. Others think the primary role of the dog was as spiritual guide to the Underworld. Those well-treated in life (and thus well-fed) would act as a guide for the owner’s safe passage to the Underworld in death. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Canon and Mrs. Nathaniel T. Whitcomb", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexico", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/78.138_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/78.138_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/78.138_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/78.138_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "27874", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }