{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 3568, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3568", "Disp_Access_No" : "1947.105", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1935", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1935", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1935", "Disp_Title" : "Telegraph Pole", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Charles Ephraim Burchfield", "Sort_Artist" : "Burchfield, Charles Ephraim", "Disp_Dimen" : "23 3/8 x 20 7/8 in. (59.4 x 53 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "23 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Watercolor", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor, charcoal and graphite", "Info_Page_Comm" : "As a symbol of American invention and progress, the telegraph pole and its wires frame a depressing landscape. The curved pole, clearly a tree cut down and stripped of its bark and limbs, is a powerful metaphor for the abuse that man and nature experience under the unstoppable momentum of industry. Railroad tracks lined by austere workers’ huts lead the viewer’s eyes back to an industrial inferno. Buffalo artist Charles Burchfield felt a great deal of reverence for the natural world. His nuanced depictions of the industrial landscape were indictments of environmental abuse. [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Charles H. Babcock", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "United States", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "This was part of Lending LIbrary of American Art at MAG as per a Gallery Notes article in 1941. How did it get Mrs. Babcock in credit line-- did she purchase from them and give to MAG later?", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/47.105_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/47.105_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/47.105_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/47.105_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "33650", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "converted from Seeing America CMYK image for web use", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/47.105_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/47.105_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/47.105_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/47.105_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "39114", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3743, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3743", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.94", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1935", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1935", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1935", "Disp_Title" : "Totems in Steel", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Charles Sheeler", "Sort_Artist" : "Sheeler, Charles", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 11/16 x 5 1/8 in. (9.4 x 13 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 11/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "image", "Medium" : "Gouache", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Gouache and watercolor", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This image of a New York City construction site is based on a film still from Charles Sheeler’s 1920 film collaboration with photographer Paul Strand, <em>Manhatta</em>. In the ten-minute film, the artists track the dynamism of Manhattan through the course of a day, focusing on the unique pulse and geometry of the city’s machinery, vehicles, and architecture. <em>Manhatta</em> provided Sheeler with numerous images from which he later painted. The title of this painting, <em>Totems in Steel</em>, frames modern engineering, industry, and architecture in quasi-religious terms. Sheeler wrote, “In a period such as ours when only a comparatively few individuals seem to be given to religion, some form other than the Gothic cathedral must be found. Industry concerns the greatest numbers—it may be true, as has been said, that our factories are our substitute for religious expression.” [label text for <em>Modern Icon: The Machine As Subject in American Art</em> exhibition, February 3 – March 6, 2012] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Peter Iselin and his sister, Emilie Iselin Wiggin", "Copyright_Type" : "No existing copyright holder", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "United States", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.94_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.94_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.94_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.94_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "27604", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk dated 1-16-05", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }