{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 3919, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3919", "Disp_Access_No" : "1996.101", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1956-1958", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1956", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1958", "Disp_Title" : "Christ", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Munakata Shiko", "Sort_Artist" : "Munakata Shiko", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 x 10 7/8 in. (61 x 27.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 in.", "Disp_Width" : "10 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Munakata Shiko was a dominant figure in Japanese printmaking, especially after the close of World War II. He rose to international fame in 1951, when he exhibited in São Paolo; in 1956, he won the first prize for printmaking at the Venice Biennale. The myriad influences on his work include his early studies of modern Western artists, particularly Henri Matisse; a strong interest in Zen Buddhism; and the Japanese creative print and folk art movements. Munakata designed Christ as one of 12 prints created for the Urasenke school of tea ceremony. In this tradition, a single hanging scroll, usually a seasonal Zen Buddhist calligraphy or ink painting of a contemplative scene, was displayed in a tea room alcove. Although Munakata was certainly aware of this custom, he chose to incorporate Western images, including this one, into his work. [Label text, 2014] Munakata Shiko was a dominant figure in Japanese printmaking, especially after the close of World War II. He rose to international fame in 1951, when he exhibited in São Paolo; in 1956, he won the first prize for printmaking at the Venice Biennale. The myriad influences on his work include his early studies of modern Western artists, particularly Henri Matisse; a strong interest in Zen Buddhism; and the Japanese creative print and folk art movements. Munakata designed Christ as one of 12 prints created for the Urasenke school of tea ceremony. In this tradition, a single hanging scroll, usually a seasonal Zen Buddhist calligraphy or ink painting of a contemplative scene, was displayed in a tea room alcove. Although Munakata was certainly aware of this custom, he chose to incorporate Western images, including this one, into his work. [Label text, 2014] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Zanetta Schutt Parks and the Naramore family", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/96.101_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/96.101_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/96.101_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/96.101_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "34550", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3923, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3923", "Disp_Access_No" : "1997.171", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "The Plum Girl", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Sekino Junichiro", "Sort_Artist" : "Sekino Junichiro", "Disp_Dimen" : "15 1/4 x 9 11/16 in. (38.8 x 24.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "15 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 11/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Sekino Junichiro was affiliated with the “First Thursday Society” of Onchi K?shir?, the founder of the s?saku hanga, or creative print, movement. Like many printmakers of his generation, he was strongly influenced by the work of Munakata Shiko, whose work is also exhibited here. Junichiro’s woodcuts include traditional themes such as the Kabuki theater, portraits of well-known personalities, and a series of the 53 stations of the Taikido Road—the same subject and number as those by the legendary Edo printmaker And? Hiroshige. Junichiro quickly became popular among western collectors after he began to exhibit internationally in 1955. He taught at the Pratt Institute in 1958, and at Oregon State University and the University of Washington in the 1960s. The Plum Girl, titled and signed in English rather than Japanese, probably dates to this period. [Label text, 2014] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Carl A. Talbot", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/97.171_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/97.171_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/97.171_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/97.171_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41065", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8945, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8945", "Disp_Access_No" : "1966.36", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1970", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1965", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1975", "Disp_Title" : "Work Number V-9", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Miyashita Tokio", "Sort_Artist" : "Miyashita Tokio", "Disp_Dimen" : "27 1/4 x 20 in. (69.2 x 50.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "27 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "Japanese paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color woodcut and intaglio", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The son of a metal supplies dealer, Miyashita is known for his prints which combine woodblock with printing from a metal plate to which found metal pieces and wires have been soldered. Miyashita studied metal intaglio printing with Sekino Jun'ichiro, whose The Plum Girl appears in this installation. [Gallery label text, 2004] Miyashita Tokio was best known for making prints from a combination of woodblocks and metal plates. He was the son of a metals dealer, which gave him the early opportunity to learn the tools and processes of metalwork. He studied both processes with master printers in high school and university. The process of combining such different techniques was complex and time consuming. Miyashita would first cut the metal plate from a sheet of zinc. He would then create his design by arranging smaller plates in an assortment of shapes and sizes. Some contained etched lines; others included found objects such as stamped metal fragments. He would then solder these elements to the plate. At this point in the process, he would turn his attention to the medium of woodcut, deciding on colors and the numbers of wooden blocks needed to create the color separations. The final prints resulted in the unique explorations of abstract forms, colors, and textures that characterize Miyashita’s work. [Label text, 2014]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Duplicate of 2005.134, examined both for possible deaccession of one of the prints with Print Preparator Carol Acquilano on 11/21/06, determined that MAG should keep both prints. entered by Cynthia Culbert", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/66.36_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/66.36_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/66.36_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/66.36_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "34517", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8946, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8946", "Disp_Access_No" : "1960.15", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1959", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1959", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1959", "Disp_Title" : "Fallen Leaves", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Hagiwara Hideo", "Sort_Artist" : "Hagiwara Hideo", "Disp_Dimen" : "18 1/2 x 13 1/16 in. (47 x 33.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "18 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "13 1/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Hagiwara Hideo began his career as an oil painter, turning to printmaking after World War II. He quickly became one of the most influential and prolific printmakers in post-war Japan. He subscribed to the creative print movement’s philosophy that art is self-expression, and should be the work of a single creator. By the late 1950s, his work was largely abstract. In this print, Hagiwara employed one of his trademark innovative techniques. He first printed the back of the sheet from an inked piece of plywood. By applying pressure to the front of the sheet, he literally pulled the color through the paper, creating a soft patina. Remaining colors and lines were then printed from additional blocks in the traditional way, on the front surface of the sheet. [Label text, 2014]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Stern", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/60.15_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/60.15_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/60.15_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/60.15_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41053", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8953, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8953", "Disp_Access_No" : "1996.58", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1976", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1976", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1976", "Disp_Title" : "Barn in Aizu", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Kiyoshi Saito", "Sort_Artist" : "Saito, Kiyoshi", "Disp_Dimen" : "18 1/8 x 23 13/16 in. (46 x 60.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "18 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "23 13/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Saito Kiyoshi’s fascination with his birthplace of Aizu, in Fukushima Prefecture, resulted in the longest-running series of his career. The first print was done in 1939; he completed the 41st, called Winter in Aizu, in 1980. Barn in Aizu is an example of Saito’s later work, in which he seeks to represent the essence of nature and the intellectual beauty of architecture through the use of a muted color palette, the wood grain of the block, and a somewhat flattened two-dimensional picture plane. [Label text, 2014]", "Dedication" : "Estates of Maurice R. and Maxine B. Forman", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/96.58_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/96.58_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/96.58_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/96.58_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41064", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8964, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8964", "Disp_Access_No" : "1996.88", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1935", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1935", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1935", "Disp_Title" : "The Cherry Tree in Kawagoe", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "The Cherry Tree in Kawagoe from Eight Scenes of Cherry Blossoms", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Hiroshi Yoshida", "Sort_Artist" : "Yoshida, Hiroshi", "Disp_Dimen" : "15 1/2 x 10 1/2 in. (39.3 x 26.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "15 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "10 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color woodcut with applied watercolor", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Yoshida Hiroshi was a leading figure in the shin-hanga, or “new print,” movement after the end of the Meiji period in 1912. He was primarily a painter until his late 40s, when he became fascinated with woodblock printing. Although his subject matter—as here, temples, landscapes, and cherry blossoms—was often reliant on that of the earlier ukiyo-e, or “floating world,” print, Yoshida departed from tradition in his working technique. Unlike ukiyo-e artists, who followed the customary strict division of labor between designer, carver and printer, Yoshida was closely involved in all parts of the printmaking process, including the design of the key blocks, choice of colors and supervision of the printmakers. Occasionally, he carved the printing blocks himself. Yoshida traveled throughout the world and was an avid mountain climber. These interests are reflected in the subject matter of his prints, which include images of alpine scenes, the Sphinx, the Taj Mahal and Mount Rainier. His work was extremely popular with Western collectors; he was one of the only shin-hanga artists to sign and title his prints in English. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Clark Fellers", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "presence of Jizuri seal and pencil signature identifies this as an original.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/96.88_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/96.88_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/96.88_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/96.88_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "16700", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8967, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8967", "Disp_Access_No" : "1966.37", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1960", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1955", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1965", "Disp_Title" : "Ceremony, Blue", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Yoshida Hodaka", "Sort_Artist" : "Yoshida Hodaka", "Disp_Dimen" : "22 1/2 x 16 9/16 in. (57.2 x 42.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "22 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "16 9/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "wove paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Yoshida Hodaka’s prints combine an awareness of and training in traditional techniques with his interest in other cultures and beliefs; these include not only Buddhism, but ancient pre-Columbian ceremonies, mythology, and folk art. With its dense blue and purple forms that resemble the inkblots of psychological tests, Ceremony, Blue dates to about 1960, and originates from the latter part of the artist’s “primitive” period. He uses color and form in an attempt to access the most elusive of subject matter, universal human spirituality. Ceremony, Blue is perhaps his effort to create, as one critic called it, an image of something “almost human,” or “something human sensed as ‘present, but not visible.’” [Label text, 2014]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/66.37_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/66.37_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/66.37_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/66.37_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41056", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }