{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 3919, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3919", "Disp_Access_No" : "1996.101", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1956-1958", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1956", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1958", "Disp_Title" : "Christ", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Munakata Shiko", "Sort_Artist" : "Munakata Shiko", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 x 10 7/8 in. (61 x 27.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 in.", "Disp_Width" : "10 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Woodcut", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Munakata Shiko was a dominant figure in Japanese printmaking, especially after the close of World War II. He rose to international fame in 1951, when he exhibited in São Paolo; in 1956, he won the first prize for printmaking at the Venice Biennale. The myriad influences on his work include his early studies of modern Western artists, particularly Henri Matisse; a strong interest in Zen Buddhism; and the Japanese creative print and folk art movements. Munakata designed Christ as one of 12 prints created for the Urasenke school of tea ceremony. In this tradition, a single hanging scroll, usually a seasonal Zen Buddhist calligraphy or ink painting of a contemplative scene, was displayed in a tea room alcove. Although Munakata was certainly aware of this custom, he chose to incorporate Western images, including this one, into his work. [Label text, 2014] Munakata Shiko was a dominant figure in Japanese printmaking, especially after the close of World War II. He rose to international fame in 1951, when he exhibited in São Paolo; in 1956, he won the first prize for printmaking at the Venice Biennale. The myriad influences on his work include his early studies of modern Western artists, particularly Henri Matisse; a strong interest in Zen Buddhism; and the Japanese creative print and folk art movements. Munakata designed Christ as one of 12 prints created for the Urasenke school of tea ceremony. In this tradition, a single hanging scroll, usually a seasonal Zen Buddhist calligraphy or ink painting of a contemplative scene, was displayed in a tea room alcove. Although Munakata was certainly aware of this custom, he chose to incorporate Western images, including this one, into his work. [Label text, 2014] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Zanetta Schutt Parks and the Naramore family", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/96.101_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/96.101_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/96.101_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/96.101_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "34550", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }