{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 192, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/192", "Disp_Access_No" : "1934.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "before 1831", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1821", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1830", "Disp_Title" : "Colonel Nathaniel Rochester", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, American", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, American", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 x 25 in. (76.2 x 63.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 in.", "Disp_Width" : "25 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Long celebrated as our city’s founder, Nathaniel Rochester (1752–1831) was recently discovered to have bought and sold enslaved people while he lived in Maryland. Not only did Rochester buy and sell enslaved people in the South as a business venture, he continued to own and profit from the labor of enslaved individuals after moving north. In fact, he did so until New York State law made it impossible for him to continue in 1827. This information makes evident how insidious and enmeshed slavery was in the business life of the early nineteenth century, even in the northern states. Many decades before Kodak gave us the snapshot, a portrait such as this one was a way for a privileged, white person of this period to capture their likeness for posterity. In comparison, the enslaved Black men, women, and children of Rochester’s household did not have their portraits painted. Their names, likenesses, and personal stories went largely unrecorded and most have not survived history—another example of the dehumanization of enslaved individuals during this period of American history. [Gallery label text, 2021]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Thomas J. Watson", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Conversation between Marjorie Searl and Holly Cumberland (Rochester family descendant) regarding acquisition and attribution of painting (December 7, 2009); Holly wanted to alert us to the book "Nathaniel" written by her grandfather, Rochester Rogers, whose son Nathaniel died of throat cancer in 1945. In the book, Rogers alludes to the painting of Nathaniel Rochester, and that it was acquired for MAG by Thomas Watson. Holly''s contention is that Thomas Watson bought the painting believing that it was by Audubon, and that as Rochester Rogers and Thomas Watson were friends, there would have been ample opportunity for Watson to have ascertained from his friend Rogers that it was in fact by Audubon. However, as I explained to Holly, it was Rochester Rogers'' sister Helen who strongly supported the Audubon attribution, so this comment does not change the fact that there is virtually no objective and external evidence pointing to this portrait''s being by Audubon, other than an anonymous inscription on the back of the painting.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/34.1_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/34.1_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/34.1_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/34.1_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12350", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 402, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/402", "Disp_Access_No" : "1942.19", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1942", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1942", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1942", "Disp_Title" : "Bar Scene", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Douglas Warner Gorsline", "Sort_Artist" : "Gorsline, Douglas Warner", "Disp_Dimen" : "29 1/2 x 25 1/4 in. (74.9 x 64.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "29 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "25 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Art Patrons' Purchase Award, 1942 Rochester-Finger Lakes Exhibition", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/42.19_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/42.19_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/42.19_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/42.19_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12362", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Note: Archival Master scan has several hairs on it which need to be removed. The most visible has been removed in the Access version; probably needs to be removed in the resized print inhouse version.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 534, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/534", "Disp_Access_No" : "1913.6", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1911-1912", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1911", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1912", "Disp_Title" : "Morning on the River", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Jonas Lie", "Sort_Artist" : "Lie, Jonas", "Disp_Dimen" : "50 x 60 in. (127 x 152.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "50 in.", "Disp_Width" : "60 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Jonas Lie captures the new American landscape of industry and technology by painting the gritty underside of the Brooklyn Bridge. [Gallery label text, 2007]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Ruth Sibley Gade in memory of James G. Averell", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/13.6_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/13.6_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/13.6_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/13.6_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12334", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008. Needs curatorial approval for other uses.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 568, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/568", "Disp_Access_No" : "1983.13", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1909", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1909", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1909", "Disp_Title" : "Woman in an Ermine Collar", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Kathleen McEnery Cunningham", "Sort_Artist" : "Cunningham, Kathleen McEnery", "Disp_Dimen" : "76 7/8 x 38 3/8 in. (195.3 x 97.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "76 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "38 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Kathleen McEnery’s early training as an Urban Realist drew her to depict reality with an uncompromising eye. The artist was about twenty-two years old and living in Paris when she painted this bold and modern woman. McEnery lived in New York, Madrid, and Paris before she moved to Rochester, NY in 1914. [Gallery label text, 2007] Kathleen McEnery was about twenty-two years old and living in Paris when she painted Woman in an Ermine Collar. She lived and trained in New York, Madrid, and Paris before moving to Rochester in 1914. McEnery played a major role in Rochester’s cultural circles, and painted throughout her life while raising a family with her husband, Francis Cunningham of the Cunningham Car Company. McEnery’s training with the American realist master Robert Henri drew her to depict with honesty the conditions of modern life. The result is this woman’s unapologetic presence. She is an embodiment of the New Woman – a cultural phenomenon of the growing women’s rights movement, of which the artist was an ardent supporter. The New Woman rebelled against traditional gender roles and was independent, confident, and physically active. As this woman’s dashing manner illustrates, she was equally as comfortable in the public domain as would be any man. [Gallery label text, 2006] In New York City, Kathleen McEnery studied with Robert Henri. She also studied abroad and exhibited two paintings at the controversial 1913 Armory Show in New York City. After her marriage to Rochesterian Francis Cunningham, whose family owned the Cunningham Carriage Factory, she continued painting in a studio off the family's home on 10 South Goodman St., now on the campus of the Rochester Museum and Science Center. As Mrs. Cunningham, she was a member of the Gallery's Board of Managers from 1927 through 1971. The model's direct and intelligent expression and forthright pose suggests the "new woman," ready to be a participant in contemporary society rather than remain at home. Certainly, McEnery herself, who had graduated from Pratt Institute and lived on her own in New York City, fit that description as well. [Gallery label text, 2003]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Joan Cunningham Williams, Peter Cunningham, and Michael McEnery Cunningham", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.13_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.13_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.13_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.13_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12491", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print master derived 11/23/09 by Lu Harper for Seeing America lesson plans. Needs to be okayed by Curatorial for any other use.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 702, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/702", "Disp_Access_No" : "1945.45", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1900-1905", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1900", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1905", "Disp_Title" : "Sullivan Street", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Everett Shinn", "Sort_Artist" : "Shinn, Everett", "Disp_Dimen" : "8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "10 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In a city of many tough neighborhoods, New York’s Sullivan Street was one of the toughest. Shinn’s depiction of the isolated figure in the foreground evokes the condition of modern man in an urban environment—a recurring theme in the art of the Urban Realists. [Gallery label text, 2007] In 1897, encouraged by his mentor Robert Henri, Shinn moved from Philadelphia to New York City. Like Luks and Glackens, he was an artist-reporter as well as a painter. He exhibited with The Eight in 1908 at Macbeth Gallery. Sullivan Street was owned by the artist until 1945, when the Memorial Art Gallery purchased the canvas directly from him. With just a few strokes of his brush, Everett Shinn has recreated an overcast winter street scene filled with mood and mystery. Sullivan Street is in Greenwich Village, around the corner from Shinn's studio on Waverly Place and near Washington Square Park, whose leafless trees can be seen beyond the buildings on the right. [Gallery label text, 2003]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/45.45_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/45.45_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/45.45_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/45.45_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "22001", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "color corrected from Jim Via''s original transparency", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 720, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/720", "Disp_Access_No" : "1988.6", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1852", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1847", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1857", "Disp_Title" : "Peeling Onions", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Lilly Martin Spencer", "Sort_Artist" : "Spencer, Lilly Martin", "Disp_Dimen" : "36 x 29 in. (91.4 x 73.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "36 in.", "Disp_Width" : "29 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Women's Council in celebration of the 75th anniversary of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/88.6_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/88.6_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/88.6_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/88.6_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12511", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4260, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4260", "Disp_Access_No" : "1947.30", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1500", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1495", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1505", "Disp_Title" : "Madonna and Child with Angel", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Raffaellino del Garbo", "Sort_Artist" : "Raffaellino del Garbo", "Disp_Dimen" : "37 1/4 x 37 1/4 in. (94.6 x 94.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "37 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "37 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "diameter", "Medium" : "Tempera", "Support" : "panel", "Disp_Medium" : "Tempera and oil on panel", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Italian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/47.30_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/47.30_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/47.30_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/47.30_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29167", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Scanned by Andy Olenick April 2009 from an undated transparency shot by James Via. Master exists only in TIF form, not DNG. On disk 090407", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5062, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5062", "Disp_Access_No" : "1977.109", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1704-1708", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1704", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1708", "Disp_Title" : "The Triumph of Judith", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francesco Solimena", "Sort_Artist" : "Solimena, Francesco", "Disp_Dimen" : "38 3/4 x 49 1/4 in. (98.4 x 125.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "38 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "49 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The subject of Judith cutting off the head of Holofernes was one of the most popular subjects in Christian art of the 1600s and 1700s. The Old Testament story tells how the heroine Judith went to the camp of Holofernes, the Assyrian general who was besieging her town. She dazzled him with her beauty; after pretending to accept his advances, she beheaded him with his own sword while he was in a drunken stupor. This painting illustrates the moment when Judith displays the trophy of her victory to the citizens she has rescued. In a Christian context, the story of the Jewish heroine represents the triumph of virtue over evil. During the Counter-Reformation, the subject also became a powerful symbol of the Catholic Church’s triumph over heresy, or dissent from its teachings. Here, Solimena shows Judith as confident that she has served the will of God. The dramatic lighting, gestures and facial expressions of the figures are intended to appeal to the emotions and inspire the faith that motivated Judith.", "Dedication" : "Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James V. Aquavella", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Italian", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/77.109_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/77.109_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/77.109_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/77.109_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "22380", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk MAG v. 56", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 10532, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/10532", "Disp_Access_No" : "2002.1a-d", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2001", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2001", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2001", "Disp_Title" : "Everett Shinn Writes Isabel Herdle", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Ken Aptekar", "Sort_Artist" : "Aptekar, Ken", "Disp_Dimen" : "", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "wood", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on wood, bolts, sandblasted glass", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2002.1a-d_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2002.1a-d_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2002.1a-d_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2002.1a-d_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "16705", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }