{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 678, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/678", "Disp_Access_No" : "1957.14", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1896", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1891", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1901", "Disp_Title" : "Mrs. William Shakespeare", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Singer Sargent", "Sort_Artist" : "Sargent, John Singer", "Disp_Dimen" : "29 3/8 x 24 1/2 in. (74.6 x 62.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "29 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "John Singer Sargent was the most fashionable portrait painter working in England and the United States in the late 1800s. He was not only a gifted artist, but an accomplished pianist and linguist. The novelist Henry James once remarked that London society at the turn of the century saw John Singer Sargent and his friends “…all swimming just now in a sea of music,” with Sargent being “as much a player as a painter.” The sitter of this portrait, Louise Weiland (c. 1850–1911), was brought up at the court of Dresden, Germany. She married the British singer, composer, and conductor William Shakespeare, one of Sargent’s closest friends, in 1875. Mrs. Shakespeare was best known for the musical salons she held in her London home, which brought together artists, musicians, and members of high society. She was described by her friend Eva Ducat as a quiet woman who “hid brilliant gifts under a gentle, deprecating manner.” According to Ducat, Sargent tried to capture Mrs. Shakespeare’s characteristic wistful expression by telling her sad stories as he painted her portrait. [Forman Gallery, Summer 2015]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Note that Sargent catalogue raisonne lists a different provenance than MAG records list. C.r. notes a replica painted for another family member which has been unaccounted for since 1912-- provenance may have been mixed up between the two? --KSchauber", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/57.14_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/57.14_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/57.14_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/57.14_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12401", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }