{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 14058, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14058", "Disp_Access_No" : "2022.30", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1918", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1918", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1918", "Disp_Title" : "Poster: Are YOU a Victory Canner?", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Poster: Are YOU a Victory Canner? - Write for Free Book to National War Garden Commission - Washington, D.C.", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Leonebel Jacobs", "Sort_Artist" : "Jacobs, Leonebel", "Disp_Dimen" : "22 x 14 in. (55.9 x 35.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "22 in.", "Disp_Width" : "14 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "America struggled to feed its soldiers, as well as the many European civilians at risk of starvation during the war. Propaganda directed primarily towards women advocated conserving food by planting "Victory Gardens," canning, and eating less wheat and meat. Food conservation was one way American women were wholeheartedly encouraged to participate in the war effort. Clever slogans like "If U fast U beat U boats" and "Serve beans by all means" were common. On a more ominous note, the Food Administration enlisted twenty million homemakers to keep watchful eyes on neighbors suspected of not following conservation rules. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "Found in collection and acquired through the New York Museum Property Act", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "United States", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Advertised to the public beginning Nov 2017; no claim made; available for curatorial decision Feb 2019.", "Images": [ ] }, ] }