{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 5515, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5515", "Disp_Access_No" : "1954.36", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1000 - 1530 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1000", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1530", "Disp_Title" : "Pendant in the Form of a Lizard or Jaguar", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Veraguas-Gran Chiriqui artist", "Sort_Artist" : "Veraguas-Gran Chiriqui artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "1 15/16 in. (4.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "1 15/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Gold", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Gold-copper alloy", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Objects made from gold played a special role in Ancient American cultures and were worn by chiefs and other members of the elite as a mark of rank and status. The gold pendants produced in this region depict a vast array of human and animal forms, as well as human-animal combinations. Chosen for its particular characteristics, the animal represented here should not be considered merely ornamental jewelry, but may instead reference a specific species of poisonous lizard. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R. T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Jewelry", "Creation_Place2" : "Panama", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/54.36_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/54.36_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/54.36_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/54.36_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20176", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/54.36_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/54.36_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/54.36_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/54.36_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20930", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "cropped from Don Strand''s original", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5481, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5481", "Disp_Access_No" : "1954.37", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "700-1550 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "700", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1550", "Disp_Title" : "Figure Pendant", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Greater Nicoya or Diquis artist", "Sort_Artist" : "Greater Nicoya or Diquis artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "2 3/8 x 1 11/16 x 1/2 in. (6 x 4.3 x 1.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "2 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "1 11/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Copper", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Gold-copper alloy", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Gold was associated with immortality in the Ancient Americas. Its unchanging nature made it a symbol of continuity, permanence and power, and it was prized for its ability to shine like and reflect the sun. Southern Central America is one of the world’s largest gold sources, and the gold found there was highly prized by the Spanish explorers. Much of the goldwork produced by Ancient Americans was melted down and taken back to Spain as currency. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R. T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Jewelry", "Creation_Place2" : "Costa Rica", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "Precolumbian", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/54.37_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/54.37_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/54.37_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/54.37_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20177", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5492, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5492", "Disp_Access_No" : "1954.38", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1000 - 1530 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1000", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1530", "Disp_Title" : "Vulture Pendant", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Veraguas-Gran Chiriqui artist", "Sort_Artist" : "Veraguas-Gran Chiriqui artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 1/16 x 3 1/4 x 13/16 in. (7.8 x 8.3 x 2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 1/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "3 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Gold-copper alloy", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Gold-copper alloy", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This vulture pendant displays the bird in standard attack mode: outstretched wings, fanned tail and sharp and deadly talons at the ready. Located under the large horned tufts atop the head are ear ornaments, jewelry usually reserved for nobility and shamans. Combining human with animal characteristics indicates this piece may represent a shaman in his vulture form. The shaman-vulture incarnation is made even more powerful by the diminutive jaguar shown clenched in the beak. The wearer would assert his dominance by wearing this pendant on his chest. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R. T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Jewelry", "Creation_Place2" : "Panama", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "Precolumbian", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/54.38_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/54.38_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/54.38_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/54.38_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31028", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5501, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5501", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.142", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 300 BCE - 500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "300 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "500", "Disp_Title" : "Ceremonial Half-Celt Pendant", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Greater Nicoya artist", "Sort_Artist" : "Greater Nicoya artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 3/8 x 1 3/8 x 1/2 in. (8.6 x 3.5 x 1.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "1 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Green stone", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Green stone", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This form traces its lineage from actual working hand-axes whose blades, or celts, were used for farming and felling trees for land use. In this incarnation, the celt has become strictly ceremonial, yet it maintains its ties to the power and prestige that accompanies land ownership. The half-celt form is one subdivision of a whole celt, carefully split length-wise to produce two pieces, each with a flat back and curved and carveable front. Depicting a crouching figure, this image may represent the human-animal combination of a shaman. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Jewelry", "Creation_Place2" : "Costa Rica", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "Precolumbian", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.142_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.142_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.142_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.142_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29788", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5508, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5508", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.146a-b", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1000-1470", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1000", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1470", "Disp_Title" : "Pair of Earspools", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Chimú artist", "Sort_Artist" : "Chimú artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "2 1/2 x 2 1/2 in. (6.4 x 6.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "2 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Silver", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Silver", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Although body piercing and tattooing may seem like a novel concept, it was a common practice and a sign of beauty and status in many cultures throughout the Ancient Americas. This matched pair of earspools once adorned the earlobes of a nobleman from the Chimú Empire. By wearing ever-larger ear plugs, ear lobes can be stretched out to accommodate such thick posts. These imposing earspools may have been secured with ties affixed either to a headdress or around the neck. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Jewelry", "Creation_Place2" : "Peru", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "Precolumbian", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.146a-b_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.146a-b_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.146a-b_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.146a-b_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20191", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }