{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 202, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/202", "Disp_Access_No" : "1978.15", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1865", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1865", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1865", "Disp_Title" : "The Night Before the Battle", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "James Henry Beard", "Sort_Artist" : "Beard, James Henry", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 1/2 x 44 1/2 in. (77.5 x 113 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "44 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "James Beard had first-hand experience as a captain in the Union army during the Civil War. This painting, completed in the year the war ended, is a dramatic statement about the ever-present possibility of death on the battlefield. [Gallery label text, 2007] Were it not for details like the skeleton keeping vigil behind the cannon, the cruciform composition of the flag draped over the sleeping soldier, and the scattered playing cards suggestive of luck and chance, this painting would be a simple narrative about the Civil War. However, such potent symbolism imbues the work with layers of spiritual significance. Perhaps the reminders of death and sacrifice that the artist included in his masterful painting emerged from his firsthand experience in the Union Army during the Civil War. The meticulously selected and carefully arranged details attest to the poignancy of the soldiers' situation and contrast with the implied violence that will occur on the morrow. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Dr. Ronald M. Lawrence", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/78.15_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/78.15_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/78.15_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/78.15_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "17539", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "New access image derived by Lu Harper from Master scan", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 352, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/352", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.5", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1860", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1860", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1860", "Disp_Title" : "Genesee Oaks", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Asher Brown Durand", "Sort_Artist" : "Durand, Asher Brown", "Disp_Dimen" : "28 1/4 x 42 in. (71.8 x 106.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "28 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "42 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Asher B. Durand was commissioned to paint this magnificent vista overlooking the Genesee River Valley in Geneseo, New York, by a member of the Wadsworth family, the village founders. At one time, they owned all the land from Geneseo to Rochester. [Gallery label text, 2007] No matter what the weather, this view across the Genesee Valley near Geneseo is as breathtaking now as it was over two hundred years ago, when landowner James S. Wadsworth commissioned Hudson River school founder Asher B. Durand to record the beauty of the landscape in a painting. In the summer of 1859, Durand traveled from New York City to the Genesee Valley to make preparatory sketches. Trained as an engraver, he recorded many of the details that he saw, but in addition, his personal belief in the immanence of the divine in the natural world motivated him to present a landscape that seems to extend infinitely. Statuesque oak trees, many of which are still standing on the land, dominate the painting. In this region, the trees were more than a decorative feature. When the Wadsworths began to sell and lease land to local farmers, they included a clause in the contract requiring that a number of trees remain after the land was cleared. This was a holdover from British husbandry; the result was a countryside that was not only beautiful but that provided sun and moisture control for humans and animals alike. Genesee Oaks was Durand's tribute to the splendor of this valley. [Gallery label text] Durand visited the Genesee country but once, sketching in the Geneseo area during late June and July of 1859. Of his trip he wrote to his son in August: "With all my troubles I believe I have learnt more about the management of colors in the painting of trees than by all my previous practice, altho' I have never produced so little in the same span of time, not having made but four studies in five weeks." During the following year, back in his studio, Durand painted Genesee Oaks, based on the sketches he had made. The painting was commissioned by James Samuel Wadsworth, a local squire, who owned the work when it was exhibited at the National Academy of Design in 1861. Seven oil studies done near Geneseo in 1859 are photographed in Durand's studio after 1878. A photograph shows three small sculptures of cows, two standing, one reclining that may have served as models for the animals in the painting. Howard S. Merritt Peters, Susan Dodge, ed. Memorial Art Gallery: An Introduction to the Collection. (Rochester, NY: The Memorial Art Gallery, 1988). p.182-3.", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Women's Council in honor of Harris K. Prior", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.5_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.5_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.5_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.5_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12463", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 958, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/958", "Disp_Access_No" : "1966.18", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1876", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1876", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1876", "Disp_Title" : "The West Wind", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Thomas Ridgeway Gould", "Sort_Artist" : "Gould, Thomas Ridgeway", "Disp_Dimen" : "70 1/2 x 23 x 33 1/4 in. (179.1 x 58.4 x 84.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "70 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "23 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Marble", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Marble", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Who was the West Wind? In Greek mythology, the West Wind was Zephyrus, one of the four wind gods. Perhaps the maker of this work, who was influenced by the mythological subjects that he saw in Italy, was describing the West Wind by showing its effect on the figure’s hair and skirt. Another interpretation suggests that the sculpture is an idealized expression of the United States’s westward expansion. It was exhibited at the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia on the occasion of the nation’s hundredth birthday in 1876. The starred belt on the waistband of the figure’s clothing could refer to the stars on the American flag. When English poet Percy Shelley wrote his Ode to the West Wind in 1820, he closed it with these immortal words: O Wind, If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind? [Gallery label text, 2004] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Isaac Gordon Estate through the Lincoln Rochester Trust Company", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "No. II under "Statuary" in Daniel Powers'' collection catalogue of 1888. ", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/66.18_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/66.18_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/66.18_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/66.18_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12432", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008.", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/powersbuilding2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/powersbuilding2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/powersbuilding2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/powersbuilding2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "17392", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Contemporary photo of the Powers Building.", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/66.18_R1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/66.18_R1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/66.18_R1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/66.18_R1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "23163", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "image derived from Seeing America tiff", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/66.18_A3.JPG", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/66.18_A3.JPG", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/66.18_A3.JPG", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/66.18_A3.JPG", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28576", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Taken at Kwanzaa Family Day, 2008", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 13365, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/13365", "Disp_Access_No" : "2005.33", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1837", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1837", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1837", "Disp_Title" : "Pittsford on the Erie Canal", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "George Harvey", "Sort_Artist" : "Harvey, George", "Disp_Dimen" : "17 1/2 x 23 1/2 in. (44.5 x 59.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "17 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "23 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "panel", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on panel", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This scene is thought to be in the vicinity of King’s Bend Park just outside of Pittsford Village. [Gallery label text, 2007]", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Margaret M. McDonald Memorial Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2005.33_A5.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2005.33_A5.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2005.33_A5.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2005.33_A5.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "27616", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk dated 1-16-05", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 710, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/710", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.139", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1866", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1866", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1866", "Disp_Title" : "Home Late", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Mortimer Smith", "Sort_Artist" : "Smith, Mortimer", "Disp_Dimen" : "40 x 46 in. (101.6 x 116.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "40 in.", "Disp_Width" : "46 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Home Late is the earliest identified painting by Mortimer Smith. The shadowy interior of the frontier cabin demonstrates his mastery of the genre scene: the rifle hanging from the ceiling side by side with drying meats and vegetables, supper cooking in the kettle suspended in the stone fireplace, and the dog sleeping peacefully by the fire. Smith is equally adept at capturing the warm glow cast by the fire as it contrasts with the cold light of the winter scene beyond the doorway. The child pausing in the doorway heightens the emotional ambiguity of the scene as he surveys the cabin's interior, perhaps to gauge the mood within as he returns home late from skating. Smith's landscape and genre scenes suggest familiarity with his better-known contemporaries, like Albert Bierstadt and Eastman Johnson. Certainly, early exposure to the work exhibited at the Cosmopolitan Art Association in Sandusky provided Smith with models of painting styles that continued to influence him throughout his life. [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.139_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.139_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.139_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.139_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "31885", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "cropped from CMYK file used in Seeing America Catalogue for web use", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }