{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 522, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/522", "Disp_Access_No" : "1991.5", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1948", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1948", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1948", "Disp_Title" : "Summer Street Scene in Harlem", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Jacob Lawrence", "Sort_Artist" : "Lawrence, Jacob", "Disp_Dimen" : "20 1/16 x 24 1/8 in. (51 x 61.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "20 1/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Tempera", "Support" : "panel", "Disp_Medium" : "Tempera on gesso panel", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Jacob Lawrence chronicled the migration of African Americans from the South to the North in the first half of the 20th century. In Summer Street Scene in Harlem, Lawrence’s style incorporates the flattened surfaces, distorted shapes, and bold colors of modernism to capture the energy and vitality of life in Harlem, New York. [Gallery label text, 2007]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "United States", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/91.5_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/91.5_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/91.5_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/91.5_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12514", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008. Needs curatorial approval for other uses.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 25526, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/25526", "Disp_Access_No" : "2014.50", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1997", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1997", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1997", "Disp_Title" : "Fishing Well", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Sam Gilliam", "Sort_Artist" : "Gilliam, Sam", "Disp_Dimen" : "94 x 48 1/2 in. (238.8 x 123.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "94 in.", "Disp_Width" : "48 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Acrylic", "Support" : "birch", "Disp_Medium" : "Acrylic on birch", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Washington D.C.-based Sam Gilliam established himself as a major artist in 1968 when he stopped using wooden stretchers to support his paintings and allowed his vivid rushes of color-stained canvas to hang, billow, and swing through space like drapery. Since that time Gilliam has gone on to create work in an astounding variety of styles while always remaining true to a fundamental disregard for the boundaries that have traditionally separated painting, sculpture, and architecture. In the early 1990s Gilliam adopted birch plywood as a support surface for his paintings, a practice he continues to the present day. In these works Gilliam achieves an architectural physicality by using overtly sculptural material—wood and its relief properties. The surface of Fishing Well is poured acrylic paint. The images, textures, and suggestion of depth derive from the way the artist pushed and pulled the acrylic paint across the wood surface. Gallery label text, [Summer 2015]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Sam Gilliam", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "United States", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2014.50_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2014.50_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2014.50_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2014.50_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "43479", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print version silhouetted out by Andy Olenick", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4009, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4009", "Disp_Access_No" : "1998.50", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1998", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1998", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1998", "Disp_Title" : "Won't Dance", "Alt_Title" : "A Hungry Monkey Will Not Dance", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Cheryl Warrick", "Sort_Artist" : "Warrick, Cheryl", "Disp_Dimen" : "39 1/16 x 26 1/4 in. (99.2 x 66.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "39 1/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "26 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Acrylic", "Support" : "wove paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Acrylic on wove paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "United States", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/98.50_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/98.50_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/98.50_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/98.50_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "13593", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11298, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11298", "Disp_Access_No" : "2002.20", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1942-1943", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1942", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1943", "Disp_Title" : "Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln Discussing Emancipation", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Hale Woodruff", "Sort_Artist" : "Woodruff, Hale", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 1/4 x 11 in. (28.6 x 27.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "11 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Tempera", "Support" : "masonite", "Disp_Medium" : "Tempera on masonite", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1942-43, a mural competition was held for the newly built Recorder of Deeds Building in Washington, D.C. The topic was "The Contribution of the Negro to the American Nation." Hale Woodruff submitted this imagined grouping of Frederick Douglass, President Lincoln, and members of Lincoln's cabinet. While Woodruff did not win the competition, his mural study is a dramatic reminder of the alliance of two of America's most courageous leaders, Lincoln and Douglass, during a period that threatened to destroy the American union. While Douglass never, in reality, met with Lincoln's cabinet, he did meet with Lincoln and repeatedly urged the president to issue the Emancipation Proclamation. Woodruff stressed the significance of Douglass's role by appropriating the historical image engraved by Ritchie and adding an animated Douglass and the colorful American flag. [Gallery label text, 2004]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "United States", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2002.20_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2002.20_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2002.20_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2002.20_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "17112", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }