{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 4889, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4889", "Disp_Access_No" : "1964.111", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "mid 19th century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1833", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1866", "Disp_Title" : "Raven Dance Mask", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Kwakwaka'wakw", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Kwakwaka'wakw", "Disp_Dimen" : "56 in. (142.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "56 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood, pigment", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment, cedar bark", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This mask represents Raven, one of the creatures most important to the Kwakwaka’wakw people. Known to be quick learners, aggressive defenders of territory, and very social with one another, ravens have been a respected clan emblem for centuries. Raven masks are worn during a portion of the hamatsa, an initiation masquerade for young men. Following a choreographed sequence, with beaks projecting upward and masks moving wildly from side to side, the hinged lower jaw of the mask is manipulated with a cord. When the cord is pulled, the mask responds with a loud clacking sound – the “hap, hap” of the birds’ voices – adding to the dramatic effect of the performance. Hamatsa is performed at Kwakwaka’wakw potlatches. Potlatches are traditional cross-clan celebrations including dancing, feasting and magnanimous distribution of gifts held to honor births, marriages, deaths and other changes in social relationships. Potlatches continue to this day, despite attempts to ban them by both the Canadian and United States governments in the late 19th century. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/64.111_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/64.111_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/64.111_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/64.111_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "19265", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7479, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7479", "Disp_Access_No" : "1983.16", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Totem Pole", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, First Nations (Canada)", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, First Nations (Canada)", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 x 4 1/8 x 4 3/4 in. (61 x 10.5 x 12.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Cedar wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Nathaniel T. Whitcomb", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.16_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.16_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.16_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.16_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25828", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.16_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.16_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.16_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.16_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "25829", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7899, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7899", "Disp_Access_No" : "1922.29", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Drinking Cup", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, First Nations (Canada)", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, First Nations (Canada)", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 1/2 x 4 x 4 in. (8.9 x 10.2 x 10.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Cherry", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Cherry bark", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Henry A. Strong", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.29_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.29_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.29_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.29_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "25871", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11299, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11299", "Disp_Access_No" : "1977.203", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Snow Beater", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Eskimo or Inuit", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Eskimo or Inuit", "Disp_Dimen" : "19 3/4 x 4 1/8 x 1/16 in. (50.2 x 10.5 x 0.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "19 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "maximum", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Snow beaters were used to remove snow from clothing before going indoors. An important accessory in the Arctic, they helped to keep clothing from deteriorating in the humid atmosphere inside. Due to the limited availability of wood in the region, most snow beaters were carved out of ivory and are much narrower than the wooden one on display here. However, groups that lived near the mouths of rivers in the arctic (primarily Alaska) would have access to driftwood, as would Yupik Eskimos living along the lower reaches of the Yukon and Kuskokwim Rivers where there were stands of trees. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Anonymous gift", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American or First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Entry in registrar''s ledger essentially blank. Does not appear in incomings.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/77.203_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/77.203_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/77.203_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/77.203_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26579", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 10110, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/10110", "Disp_Access_No" : "1983.18", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Grease Dish", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Nisga'a", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Nisga'a", "Disp_Dimen" : "2 1/4 x 5 1/2 x 11 3/4 in. (5.7 x 14 x 29.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "2 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Cedar, opercula (sea snail shell) inlay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The eulachon fish, a type of smelt with a very high oil content, was dried then pressed for its oil. This oil (still used today in cooking and flavoring) was placed in a grease dish on the table, into which diners would dip dried fish and other delicacies. This dish is decorated around the rim with opercula, the highly prized ornamental part of a snail shell. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Nathaniel T. Whitcomb", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.18_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.18_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.18_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.18_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26666", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2800, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2800", "Disp_Access_No" : "1983.19", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Ceremonial Paddle", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Haida", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Haida", "Disp_Dimen" : "42 5/8 x 4 5/8 in. (108.3 x 11.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "42 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In the traditional repertoire of canoe paddles, there were several styles of blades and handles that were determined by the type of water travel intended and by whether the paddles were made for men, women, or children. This paddle was made for use in a dance; an actual paddle would be longer. Ceremonial paddles are fairly common, and still in use. Images of birds, symbols of great strength and pride, are often used in the decoration of paddles and on other items relating to a journey. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Nathaniel T. Whitcomb", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Woodwork", "Creation_Place2" : "First Nations (Canada)", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.19_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.19_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.19_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.19_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31035", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }