{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 218, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/218", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.4", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1880-1890", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1880", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1890", "Disp_Title" : "Afternoon Light", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Ralph Albert Blakelock", "Sort_Artist" : "Blakelock, Ralph Albert", "Disp_Dimen" : "16 1/8 x 24 1/16 in. (41 x 61.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "16 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 1/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This brooding, moody canvas was created by one of the most haunted souls in the history of American art. Ralph Blakelock, a man diagnosed as a paranoid schizophrenic and placed in a sanitarium for fifteen years, painted some of the most mysterious, expressive and poetic paintings in 19th century America. Indeed, his interest in and exploration of the unknown and the expressive were deeply admired by such radical 20th century abstract painters as Willem deKooning, Jackson Pollock and Franz Kline.... [Gallery label text]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "United States", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "No. 714 in the Nebraska Blakelock Inventory at the University of Nebraska.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.4_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.4_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.4_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.4_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12462", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 455, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/455", "Disp_Access_No" : "1941.32", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1894", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1894", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1894", "Disp_Title" : "The Artist's Studio in an Afternoon Fog", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Winslow Homer", "Sort_Artist" : "Homer, Winslow", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 x 30 1/4 in. (61 x 76.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 in.", "Disp_Width" : "30 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In the course of his long and distinguished career, Winslow Homer shifted his focus from robust descriptions of American life to studies of interaction between man and the powerful forces of nature, particularly the ocean. This evocative painting of his studio at his family’s compound on the coast of Maine in Prout’s Neck, near Portland, is considered one of Homer’s most masterful works. [Gallery label text, 2007] A foggy day on the coastal peninsula of Prout's Neck, Maine, inspired Winslow Homer to paint one of his most elegant and contemplative works. His studio and family home stand silhouetted between the darker cliffs in the foreground and the paler sky. The painting's composition balances strong diagonal and horizontal elements in the lower half with a monolithic sky punctuated by a circle of sun. Homer was known for his many paintings of rural America, as well as his illustrations of the Civil War. In 1883, Homer left New York City, where he had been living, and settled permanently in Prout's Neck. During his years there, he produced some of the most thrilling marine paintings in the history of American art. [Gallery label text, 2006]", "Dedication" : "R. T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "United States", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "In 1991 a NYC composer named Dana Paul Perna, visited the Gallery and was so inspired by this work that he composed "Prout''s Neck" a work for piano/harp/percussion and strings. ", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/41.32_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/41.32_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/41.32_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/41.32_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "12358", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/41.32_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/41.32_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/41.32_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/41.32_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "53274", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Re-derived from original master because derivative images determined to be too warm.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 707, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/707", "Disp_Access_No" : "1941.33", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1907", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1907", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1907", "Disp_Title" : "Election Night", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "John Sloan", "Sort_Artist" : "Sloan, John", "Disp_Dimen" : "26 3/8 x 32 1/4 in. (67 x 81.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "26 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "32 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This scene, nearly unintelligible in its crowding and confusion, is Sloan’s celebration of the furor of the city on election night. [Gallery label text, 2007] John Sloan met Robert Henri in Philadelphia, and from early on maintained a friendship and correspondence with him until Henri died in 1929. He moved to New York City at Henri’s urging. On November 5, 1907, he wrote: “Election Day… saw the noisy trumpet blowers, confetti throwers and the 'ticklers' in use - a small feather duster on a stick which is pushed in the face of each girl by the men, and in the face of men by the girls. A good humorous crowd, so dense in places that it was impossible to control one's movement.” The location, Herald Square at 34th and Broadway, was close by the New York Herald Building as well as Macy's. The elevated railroad tracks loomed overhead, increasing the suggestion of noise and activity in the scene. Sloan included Election Night as one of his entries in the 1908 exhibition at Macbeth Gallery. In his estimation, it was “…one of my best things. So that I felt happy in the evening, that good all over feeling that only comes from satisfaction in work - the real happiness, the joy of accomplishing or thinking that one has accomplished, which amounts to the same thing.” [Gallery label text, 2003]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "United States", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Originally paid from R. T. Miller Fund, but later transferred to Gould Fund for unknown reasons.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/41.33_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/41.33_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/41.33_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/41.33_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12359", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Print Master derived from Digital Master for Seeing America Pachyderm project August 2008.", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }