{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 7838, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7838", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.78", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Yam Mask", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Abelam artist", "Sort_Artist" : "Abelam artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 3/4 x 12 1/4 x 2 1/4 in. (29.8 x 31.1 x 5.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "12 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Grasses", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Grass, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Abelam yam masks were never worn by humans. They are so small because they were made to adorn the long yams grown by the Abelam people of Papua New Guinea. These long yams, which were not eaten, grow up to 6-9 feet and were exchanged between men as a form of community building. An Abelam man’s prestige was measured in direct proportion to the size of his yams. Special long yams with anthropomorphic features were considered living supernatural beings and were lavishly decorated with paint, feathers, shells, leaves, and masks, and then publicly displayed. The interlacing between solid bands refers to the caterpillar found on yam vines. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinea", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.78_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.78_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.78_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.78_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26803", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4910, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4910", "Disp_Access_No" : "1969.107", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Crest Mask: Male Antelope (Chi Wara)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Bamana artist", "Sort_Artist" : "Bamana artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "40 9/16 x 2 15/16 x 13 9/16 in. (103 x 7.5 x 34.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "40 9/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "2 15/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, fiber, and metal", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In many cultures, gods and spirits take the form of animals. Selected for their physical or behavioral traits, features of different animals are combined to create mythical creatures whose symbolic powers are greater than those of ordinary beasts. This antelope crest mask combines the curved horns of an antelope, the curious snout and scales of a pangolin (a kind of anteater) and the squat body of an aardvark—all animals that dig up the earth. This makes the mask a fitting representations of Chi Wara, the supernatural being the Bamana believe taught humans to farm. Chi wara masks were worn in male/female pairs during dance performances in the fields that taught and encouraged good farming. Today, because of conversion to Islam and a variety of social changes due to westernization, the Chi Wara masquerade is now performed for entertainment and cultural pride. The small pieces of red cloth attached to the snout of this male Chi Wara may have originated in the woolen bandages imported by the French during the First World War. In Bamana culture, red is the color of danger and is often restricted to men of certain status. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Mali", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.107_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.107_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.107_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.107_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28367", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.107_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.107_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.107_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.107_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28368", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/69.107_A6.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/69.107_A6.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/69.107_A6.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/69.107_A6.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28370", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "At the left, with 93.14 on the right. On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 851, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/851", "Disp_Access_No" : "1993.14", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Crest Mask: Female Antelope (Chi Wara)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Bamana artist", "Sort_Artist" : "Bamana artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 1/2 x 7 5/8 x 8 in. (77.5 x 19.4 x 20.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, cane, shell, yarn and brass", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In many cultures, gods and spirits take the form of animals. Selected for their physical or behavioral traits, features of different animals are combined to create mythical creatures whose symbolic powers are greater than those of ordinary beasts. This antelope crest mask combines the curved horns of an antelope, the curious snout and scales of a pangolin (a kind of anteater) and the squat body of an aardvark—all animals that dig up the earth. This makes them fitting representations of Chi Wara, the supernatural being the Bamana believe taught humans to farm. The masks were worn in male/female pairs during dance performances in the fields that taught and encouraged good farming. Today, because of conversion to Islam and a variety of social changes due to westernization, the Chi Wara masquerade is now performed for entertainment and cultural pride. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Isabel C. Herdle", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Mali", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.14_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.14_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.14_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.14_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28376", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.14_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.14_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.14_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.14_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28377", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.14_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.14_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.14_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.14_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28378", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/93.14_A5.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/93.14_A5.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/93.14_A5.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/93.14_A5.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28379", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On the right, with 69.107 on the left. On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7829, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7829", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.139", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Gable Mask", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Iatmul artist", "Sort_Artist" : "Iatmul artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "14 3/4 x 7 11/16 x 4 1/2 in. (37.5 x 19.5 x 11.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "14 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 11/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment, shell", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The spiritual lives of Melanesian communities are dominated by Men’s Societies. The ceremonial Men’s House is the sacred dwelling place of the clan spirits, treasures, and of initiated men. Gable masks like this adorned the façades of Men’s Houses. Similar to gargoyles in medieval churches, these figures were meant to ward off troublesome spirits that can cause illness and spread mischief. Gable masks embodied powerful female, ancestral spirits. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinea", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.139_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.139_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.139_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.139_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "26798", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.139_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.139_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.139_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.139_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28374", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7857, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7857", "Disp_Access_No" : "1987.84", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1950-1987", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1950", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1987", "Disp_Title" : "Spirit Board (Gope)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Papua New Guinean artist", "Sort_Artist" : "Papua New Guinean artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "54 x 12 3/4 in. (137.2 x 32.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "54 in.", "Disp_Width" : "12 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Traditionally, spirit or gope boards were considered dwelling places for individual spirits. Each spirit was linked to specific parts of the land, river or sea associated with the clan. They were kept in each clan’s cubicle within the larger Men’s House along with other items such as human and animal skulls meant to honor various spirits within their clan. The boards' highly stylized imagery is believed to represent the way the spirit looks. While the imagery reflects certain consistencies within clans, their varied style and appearance reflects individual artists’ representations of individual spirits. Despite differences, every board has a face and a navel. The navel was particularly important because it served as the access point through which the spirit entered the board. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of James and Denise Wasserstrom", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinea", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/87.84_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/87.84_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/87.84_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/87.84_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29879", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "These images are smaller than the usual in-house registration photographs because they were taken with Jessica Marten''s personal Canon camera which does not have a raw file format. But because they were taken with accession numbers and color bars, it was determined it was best to create master, print, access files, rather than just access files. These are not appropriate for publication, but are perfectly good for web display.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7418, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7418", "Disp_Access_No" : "1972.54", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Crest Mask", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Yaka artist", "Sort_Artist" : "Yaka artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "20 1/4 x 18 1/4 x 15 in. (51.4 x 46.4 x 38.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "20 1/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "18 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, fiber, pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Masks like this one are danced by young Yaka men in celebration of completing a stage of their initiation into manhood. These masks provide protection to the young, vulnerable men as they enter into the challenges and responsibilities of adulthood. In particular, they are meant to insure the young men’s virility for the future of the community. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Democratic Republic of the Congo", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/72.54_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/72.54_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/72.54_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/72.54_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "26797", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/72.54_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/72.54_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/72.54_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/72.54_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31037", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }