{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 3560, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3560", "Disp_Access_No" : "1944.6", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1939-1941", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1939", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1941", "Disp_Title" : "Mathematical Abstraction No. 5 "Study in complementaries"", "Alt_Title" : "Projective Ornament", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Claude Fayette Bragdon", "Sort_Artist" : "Bragdon, Claude Fayette", "Disp_Dimen" : "28 3/8 x 20 5/16 in. (72.1 x 51.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "28 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 5/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Watercolor", "Support" : "thin board", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor, charcoal, ink and pen with red ink", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Bragdon’s Mathematical Abstractions is a set of images based on mathematical relationships and suggestive of cosmic forms in the solar system. This series grew out of Bragdon’s continued interest in uniting color, form, and music. The series was exhibited in 1941-42 in Hartford, New York City, and finally in Rochester at the Memorial Art Gallery, where Bragdon’s patrons, Dr. and Mrs. James Sibley Watson, agreed to purchase this one for MAG. Bragdon wrote about the gift to Isabel Herdle, MAG curator, in 1944: “It is the one which your sister [Gertrude Herdle Moore, MAG director] and Fritz [Trautmann] decided would be best and which was also settled upon by Mrs. Watson and myself.” The Mathematical Abstraction series was best described by the artist in the 1941-42 exhibition brochure: "These fifteen water-color paintings represent the final distillation of Mr. Bragdon’s creative ability in a field which he has made his own. Although susceptible of classification as non-representational, or non-objective art, they are unique by reason of the fact that Mr. Bragdon is a skilled mathematician and geometer as well as an artist. He does not wish these paintings to be viewed, however, from any other standpoint than that of their intrinsic beauty—their purely aesthetic appeal. He believes that mathematical truth is at the root of all beauty, and that in the same sense that music may be said to be the beauty of mathematics made audible, so are these paintings mathematics made visible. After having made many hundred drawings, Mr. Bragdon made the paintings here and now exhibited, which from one point of view might be regarded as so many 'stills' of color symphonies seen by the author 'in his mind’s eye.' One of the pioneers in the new art of Color Music, Mr. Bragdon has from far back employed his spare time and his spare money in the construction of one “color-organ” after another, in which it was his idea to add luminosity, color, rhythm, mobility, to his designs derived from mathematical sources. Convinced, after many failures, that the most satisfactory way in which this might be accomplished was by the animated cartoon technique, he made a study of it with this in view, and tried to interest the moving picture people in his idea. None of them were prepared, however, to invest the necessary amount of money in what they regarded as an uncertain venture. Walt Disney, meantime, a free agent, with the means at his disposal, had gone ahead and in certain parts of “Fantasia”—notably in the “sound-track” sequence—approximated some of the color-music effects which Mr. Bragdon had had in mind." Excerpt from Mathematical Abstractions exhibition brochure, 1941-42 [Gallery label text, 2010] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Friends of the Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/44.6_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/44.6_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/44.6_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/44.6_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "33962", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "See other views on disk: MAG 100622", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3043, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3043", "Disp_Access_No" : "1944.7", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1920-1929", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1920", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1929", "Disp_Title" : "Design for Decorative Lighting", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Claude Fayette Bragdon", "Sort_Artist" : "Bragdon, Claude Fayette", "Disp_Dimen" : "16 1/2 x 11 5/8 in. (41.9 x 29.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "16 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "11 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Ink", "Support" : "thin board", "Disp_Medium" : "India Ink on thin board", "Info_Page_Comm" : "As an architect, Bragdon had long been frustrated by the lack of a modern architectural ornament style free from cultural and historical associations. Like philosophers and artists before him, he sought a sacred geometry of cosmic significance and harmonious design. In his 1915 book Projective Ornament he outlined a universal system of design based on numbers and geometry abstracted from nature. Bragdon’s mystical beliefs influenced his use of the fourth dimension in creating his ornament. He believed in the fourth dimension as a mystical hyperspace that explained some of the mysteries of life and the afterlife. Bragdon based his new ornamental style on a complex system of projecting and manipulating two-dimensional shapes such as squares and triangles into four-dimensional shapes such as tesseracts and pentahedroids. Claude Bragdon was a prolific writer who often illustrated his books with his own projective ornament designs. This design begins the chapter “The Eternal Feminine” in Old Lamps for New: The Ancient Wisdom in the Modern World (1925). Bragdon envisioned projective ornament as a universal design system for all facets of life from architectural environments to book jackets, from clothing to lamps. [Gallery label text, 2010]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/44.7_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/44.7_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/44.7_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/44.7_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "33954", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 739, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/739", "Disp_Access_No" : "1956.65", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1942", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1942", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1942", "Disp_Title" : "Galaxy", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Fritz Trautmann", "Sort_Artist" : "Trautmann, Fritz", "Disp_Dimen" : "35 x 29 1/2 in. (88.9 x 74.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "35 in.", "Disp_Width" : "29 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "For thirty-three years Fritz Trautmann’s passion for painting inspired his students in MAG’s Creative Workshop. Over his lifetime, he developed an approach to color that was scientific as well as mystical, and in 1942 he painted Galaxy to teach his theories to students. MAG purchased the painting from the artist in 1956. It has been a visitor favorite ever since. Despite appearances, not a single drop of black paint was used, as Trautmann believed it dampened the natural vibrations of color. Focusing on what he considered the four primary colors rather than the traditional three, Trautmann wrote, Galaxy symbolizes the great truth that every phenomenon in life involves ALL of life. Each globe of Galaxy is composed of EXACTLY THE SAME ELEMENTS. The entire spectrum wraps itself around each globe with unvarying uniformity. Warm red plays across the field from the left, bright yellow streams down from above, cold blue comes in from the right, and deep violet rises from the bottom. [Summer 2015]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Copyright Assigned to MAG", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/56.65_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/56.65_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/56.65_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/56.65_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "13419", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/56.65_R1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/56.65_R1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/56.65_R1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/56.65_R1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "28765", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/56.65_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/56.65_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/56.65_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/56.65_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "41035", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Rescanned in-house from transparency and re-color corrected to create larger file for RIT iPad project, 2013", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3561, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3561", "Disp_Access_No" : "1956.91", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1915", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1910", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1920", "Disp_Title" : "Shield for Song and Light Festival", "Alt_Title" : "Design for Stained Glass Medallion", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Claude Fayette Bragdon", "Sort_Artist" : "Bragdon, Claude Fayette", "Disp_Dimen" : "13 3/8 x 13 3/8 in. (34 x 34 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "13 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Watercolor", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor and ink on paper with glass and lead", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Like philosophers and artists before him, Claude Bragdon sought a sacred geometry of cosmic significance and harmonious design. In his 1915 book Projective Ornament he outlined a modern, universal system of design based on numbers and geometry abstracted from nature. Bragdon’s beliefs in Theosophy influenced his use of the fourth dimension in creating his ornament. He believed in the fourth dimension as a mystical hyperspace that explained some of the mysteries of life and the afterlife. Bragdon based his new ornamental style on a complex system of projecting and manipulating two-dimensional shapes such as squares and triangles into four-dimensional shapes such as tesseracts and pentahedroids. In September of 1915, Claude Bragdon helped organize the Song and Light Festival, a community-building public singing event held in Highland Park. As Master of Light, Bragdon used projective ornament to design colorful circular glass shields and Japanese-style lanterns that he artfully arranged around the stage. Lit by electricity, Bragdon’s projective ornament designs created an otherworldly outdoor environment likened to a “cathedral without walls.” Bragdon was intensely absorbed and inspired by this new endeavor in which he could aid progressive social reform using his passion for color, light, drama and modern ornament. The popularity of the Rochester festival soon spread to other cities in the northeast, and Bragdon was involved in staging Song and Light Festivals through 1918. [Gallery label text, 2010] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Chandler Bragdon", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Decorative Arts", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/56.91_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/56.91_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/56.91_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/56.91_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "27100", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 740, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/740", "Disp_Access_No" : "1960.55", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1951", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1951", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1951", "Disp_Title" : "The Atom", "Alt_Title" : "Creation of Matter", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Fritz Trautmann", "Sort_Artist" : "Trautmann, Fritz", "Disp_Dimen" : "35 x 29 1/2 in. (88.9 x 74.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "35 in.", "Disp_Width" : "29 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The architect and designer, Claude Bragdon, introduced his friend Fritz Trautmann to magic squares, in which arranged numbers equal the same amount in the verticals, horizontals and long diagonals. In lines that follow the numbers of a magic square in their natural order (1, 2, 3…), Trautmann observed orbital patterns replicating natural forms. On March 4, 1912 Bragdon wrote in his diary, “Trautmann [has] discovered the spiral law of space.” From this, Trautmann developed his Principal of the Orbit, a philosophical explanation for creation, evolution, and existence: “I am borne spinning along in the great whirlpool of evolution. It is because I am a child of nature that I am able to conceive only spinning and spiraling things – whirling worlds, universes of nebulae, stars, planets, satellites; universes of molecules, atoms, electrons, protons; universes of embryos, nuclei, chromosomes, genes. By reflection I rotate; my universe turns because I myself turn…my sphere of activity assumes an orbital motion because I am the spinning center of it.” [Gallery label text, 2010]", "Dedication" : "Bequest of Fannie Benjamin", "Copyright_Type" : "Copyright Assigned to MAG", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/60.55_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/60.55_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/60.55_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/60.55_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "33353", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/60.55_R1.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/60.55_R1.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/60.55_R1.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/60.55_R1.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "37901", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Photo of Fritz Trautmann in front of this painting. Original is in the Gallery''s archives.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 567, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/567", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.82", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1927", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1927", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1927", "Disp_Title" : "Fritz Trautmann", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Kathleen McEnery Cunningham", "Sort_Artist" : "Cunningham, Kathleen McEnery", "Disp_Dimen" : "36 x 30 in. (91.4 x 76.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "36 in.", "Disp_Width" : "30 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Fritz Trautmann—landscape architect, painter, colorist, teacher—was an important figure in Rochester’s art community. He was at the center of the city’s bohemian life with one foot in the upper echelon of Rochester society, with friends like businesswoman Kate Gleason and patron of the arts Charlotte Whitney Allen. He was known to have painted many murals in East Avenue mansions. Artist and influential MAG board member Kathleen McEnery Cunningham painted this portrait of her friend Fritz Trautmann. It seems Trautmann was pleased with the likeness as the portrait hung above his mantel for many years. Upon his death, the painting came to the Memorial Art Gallery with his estate. [Gallery label text, 2010]", "Dedication" : "Anonymous gift", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "This portrait belonged to Trautmann. A label in the curatorial file says this was the gift of the Trautmann estate, but no incoming was found. Inc. 6437 from the estate, in Oct 1972, lists only photos and notebooks, no paintings. --KSchauber Jun 2021", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.82_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.82_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.82_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.82_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "21359", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk MAG v. 53", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 741, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/741", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.6", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1921", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1921", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1921", "Disp_Title" : "River Garden", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Fritz Trautmann", "Sort_Artist" : "Trautmann, Fritz", "Disp_Dimen" : "31 x 29 3/4 in. (78.7 x 75.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "31 in.", "Disp_Width" : "29 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In River Garden, we see the two passions of Fritz Trautmann’s life: color and landscape architecture. In a letter to the painting’s donors, Trautmann wrote, “This is a corner of my River Road garden. I’ve made many gardens in my day, but this one gave me the most pleasure. It was built in the ruined foundation of a barn that burned many years ago. As I remember it there were thirteen different levels… It was located about midway between the old River Bend Inn and Balentine bridge [sic] on the east side of the Genesee River.” Although he lived in the city of Rochester, Trautmann sought rural surroundings in the summer. He stayed in the house attached to this garden in the 1920s; by the early 1930s he purchased and refurbished an old farmhouse and its gardens on Canadice Lake. [Gallery label text, 2010] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. William G. Staudenmaier", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "With group of letters by artist to donor. No incoming for this?", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.6_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.6_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.6_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.6_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "33971", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "See other views on disk: MAG 100622", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 742, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/742", "Disp_Access_No" : "1977.108", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Untitled", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Fritz Trautmann", "Sort_Artist" : "Trautmann, Fritz", "Disp_Dimen" : "42 1/2 x 31 1/2 in. (108 x 80 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "42 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "31 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "board", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on board", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Stern", "Copyright_Type" : "Copyright Assigned to MAG", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/77.108_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/77.108_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/77.108_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/77.108_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "33350", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11717, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11717", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.15.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "19th Century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1800", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1899", "Disp_Title" : "Stencil (Katagami)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Japanese", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Japanese", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 13/16 x 16 1/8 in. (24.9 x 40.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 13/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "16 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Mulberry paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Transfer from Rush Rhees Library, Claude Bragdon Papers", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Stencil", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Andrea Reithmayr believes these katagami may have been given by Cleome Carroll (Wadsworth) to Bragdon, although there does not seem to be any documentation of this. Carroll and Bragdon lived in the Shelton Hotel in New York at the same time and collaborated on the article "Art and Industry." See e-mail from Andrea in curatorial file. --KSchauber, Research Ass''t, July 2014", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.15.1_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.15.1_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.15.1_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.15.1_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "17210", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11718, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11718", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.15.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "19th Century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1800", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1899", "Disp_Title" : "Stencil (Katagami)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Japanese", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Japanese", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 x 16 in. (25.4 x 40.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 in.", "Disp_Width" : "16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Mulberry paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Transfer from Rush Rhees Library, Claude Bragdon Papers", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Stencil", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Andrea Reithmayr believes these katagami may have been given by Cleome Carroll (Wadsworth) to Bragdon, although there does not seem to be any documentation of this. Carroll and Bragdon lived in the Shelton Hotel in New York at the same time and collaborated on the article "Art and Industry." See e-mail from Andrea in curatorial file. --KSchauber, Research Ass''t, July 2014", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.15.2_A5.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.15.2_A5.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.15.2_A5.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.15.2_A5.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "17211", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11719, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11719", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.15.3", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "19th Century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1800", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1899", "Disp_Title" : "Stencil (Katagami)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Japanese", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Japanese", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 7/16 x 15 15/16 in. (23.9 x 40.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 7/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "15 15/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Mulberry paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Transfer from Rush Rhees Library, Claude Bragdon Papers", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Stencil", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Andrea Reithmayr believes these katagami may have been given by Cleome Carroll (Wadsworth) to Bragdon, although there does not seem to be any documentation of this. Carroll and Bragdon lived in the Shelton Hotel in New York at the same time and collaborated on the article "Art and Industry." See e-mail from Andrea in curatorial file. --KSchauber, Research Ass''t, July 2014", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.15.3_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.15.3_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.15.3_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.15.3_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "17212", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11721, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11721", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.15.5", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "19th Century", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1800", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1899", "Disp_Title" : "Stencil (Katagami)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Japanese", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Japanese", "Disp_Dimen" : "13 1/2 x 16 1/4 in. (34.3 x 41.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "13 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "16 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Mulberry paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Transfer from Rush Rhees Library, Claude Bragdon Papers", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Stencil", "Creation_Place2" : "Japanese", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Andrea Reithmayr believes these katagami may have been given by Cleome Carroll (Wadsworth) to Bragdon, although there does not seem to be any documentation of this. Carroll and Bragdon lived in the Shelton Hotel in New York at the same time and collaborated on the article "Art and Industry." See e-mail from Andrea in curatorial file. --KSchauber, Research Ass''t, July 2014", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.15.5_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.15.5_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.15.5_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.15.5_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "17214", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3562, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3562", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.57", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1939-1941", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1939", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1941", "Disp_Title" : "Mathematical Abstraction No. 6 "Split complementary"", "Alt_Title" : "Projective Ornament", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Claude Fayette Bragdon", "Sort_Artist" : "Bragdon, Claude Fayette", "Disp_Dimen" : "28 x 20 in. (71.1 x 50.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "28 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Watercolor", "Support" : "thin board", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor, graphite, charcoal and red colored pencil", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Bragdon’s Mathematical Abstractions is a set of images based on mathematical relationships and suggestive of cosmic forms in the solar system. This series grew out of Bragdon’s continued interest in uniting color, form, and music. The series was exhibited in 1941-42 in Hartford, New York City, and finally in Rochester at the Memorial Art Gallery. The Mathematical Abstractions were best described by the artist in the 1941-42 exhibition brochure: "These fifteen water-color paintings represent the final distillation of Mr. Bragdon’s creative ability in a field which he has made his own. Although susceptible of classification as non-representational, or non-objective art, they are unique by reason of the fact that Mr. Bragdon is a skilled mathematician and geometer as well as an artist. He does not wish these paintings to be viewed, however, from any other standpoint than that of their intrinsic beauty—their purely aesthetic appeal. He believes that mathematical truth is at the root of all beauty, and that in the same sense that music may be said to be the beauty of mathematics made audible, so are these paintings mathematics made visible. After having made many hundred drawings, Mr. Bragdon made the paintings here and now exhibited, which from one point of view might be regarded as so many 'stills' of color symphonies seen by the author 'in his mind’s eye.' One of the pioneers in the new art of Color Music, Mr. Bragdon has from far back employed his spare time and his spare money in the construction of one “color-organ” after another, in which it was his idea to add luminosity, color, rhythm, mobility, to his designs derived from mathematical sources. Convinced, after many failures, that the most satisfactory way in which this might be accomplished was by the animated cartoon technique, he made a study of it with this in view, and tried to interest the moving picture people in his idea. None of them were prepared, however, to invest the necessary amount of money in what they regarded as an uncertain venture. Walt Disney, meantime, a free agent, with the means at his disposal, had gone ahead and in certain parts of “Fantasia”—notably in the “sound-track” sequence—approximated some of the color-music effects which Mr. Bragdon had had in mind." Excerpt from Mathematical Abstractions exhibition brochure, 1941-42 [Gallery label text, 2010] ", "Dedication" : "Transfer from Department of Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/84.57_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/84.57_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/84.57_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/84.57_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "34484", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2556, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2556", "Disp_Access_No" : "1996.42", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "before 1913", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1903", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1912", "Disp_Title" : "Tile from New York Central Railroad Station, Rochester, New York", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "William H. Grueby", "Sort_Artist" : "Grueby, William H.", "Disp_Dimen" : "4 3/4 x 6 x 7/8 in. (12.1 x 15.2 x 2.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "4 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "6 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Ceramic", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Ceramic", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1909 Claude Bragdon received the commission for the New York Central Railroad Station in Rochester. Inspired by Louis Sullivan’s mantra, “form follows function,” Bragdon’s design for the exterior of the building was based on the wheels of a locomotive. The interior design incorporated geometric shapes with a freestyle treatment of a variety of historic styles. The New York Central Railroad Station, completed in 1913, was to be demolished in 1965. All that remains are the artist’s renderings, photographs, and tiles salvaged from the interior. [Gallery label text, 2010]", "Dedication" : "Estates of Maurice R. and Maxine B. Forman", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "Arts & Crafts", "Edition" : "", "Related_Children" : [ { "Rel_Obj_ID" : "2601", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Tile from NYCRR Train Station, Rochester" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "2602", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Tile from NYCRR Train Station, Rochester" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "2603", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Tile from NYCRR Train Station, Rochester" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3485", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Tile from NYCRR Train Station, Rochester" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3486", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Tile from NYCRR Train Station, Rochester" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3487", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Tile from NYCRR Train Station, Rochester" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "3488", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Tile from NYCRR Train Station, Rochester" } ], "Curator" : "Most likely came from the Claude Bragdon-designed New York Central train station in Rochester, New York, which was demolished in 1965.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/96.42_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/96.42_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/96.42_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/96.42_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "27520", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4154, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4154", "Disp_Access_No" : "1999.61", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1939-1941", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1939", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1941", "Disp_Title" : "Mathematical Abstraction No. 14 "The sun by day and the moon by night"", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Claude Fayette Bragdon", "Sort_Artist" : "Bragdon, Claude Fayette", "Disp_Dimen" : "28 3/8 x 20 x 1 3/16 in. (72.1 x 50.8 x 3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "28 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "20 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Watercolor", "Support" : "four ply board", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor and graphite on four ply Whatman watercolor board", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Bragdon’s Mathematical Abstractions is a set of images based on mathematical relationships and suggestive of cosmic forms in the solar system. This series grew out of Bragdon’s continued interest in uniting color, form, and music. The series was exhibited in 1941-42 in Hartford, New York City, and finally in Rochester at the Memorial Art Gallery. The Mathematical Abstractions were best described by the artist in the 1941-42 exhibition brochure: "These fifteen water-color paintings represent the final distillation of Mr. Bragdon’s creative ability in a field which he has made his own. Although susceptible of classification as non-representational, or non-objective art, they are unique by reason of the fact that Mr. Bragdon is a skilled mathematician and geometer as well as an artist. He does not wish these paintings to be viewed, however, from any other standpoint than that of their intrinsic beauty—their purely aesthetic appeal. He believes that mathematical truth is at the root of all beauty, and that in the same sense that music may be said to be the beauty of mathematics made audible, so are these paintings mathematics made visible. After having made many hundred drawings, Mr. Bragdon made the paintings here and now exhibited, which from one point of view might be regarded as so many 'stills' of color symphonies seen by the author 'in his mind’s eye.' One of the pioneers in the new art of Color Music, Mr. Bragdon has from far back employed his spare time and his spare money in the construction of one “color-organ” after another, in which it was his idea to add luminosity, color, rhythm, mobility, to his designs derived from mathematical sources. Convinced, after many failures, that the most satisfactory way in which this might be accomplished was by the animated cartoon technique, he made a study of it with this in view, and tried to interest the moving picture people in his idea. None of them were prepared, however, to invest the necessary amount of money in what they regarded as an uncertain venture. Walt Disney, meantime, a free agent, with the means at his disposal, had gone ahead and in certain parts of “Fantasia”—notably in the “sound-track” sequence—approximated some of the color-music effects which Mr. Bragdon had had in mind." Excerpt from Mathematical Abstractions exhibition brochure, 1941-42 [Gallery label text, 2010]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Peter Bragdon", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/99.61_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/99.61_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/99.61_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/99.61_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "33981", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "See other views on disk: MAG 100622", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }