{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 14106, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14106", "Disp_Access_No" : "2006.39", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1960s", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1955", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1965", "Disp_Title" : "Jar", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Maria Martinez", "Sort_Artist" : "Martinez, Maria", "Disp_Dimen" : "4 3/4 x 6 in. (12.1 x 15.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "4 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "6 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "pieced sheets", "Medium" : "Blackware", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Blackware", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The name and work of Maria Martinez is recognized far and wide. Learning the art of pottery-making from her aunt, she began making pots with her husband Julian Martinez several years after they were married. They became well-known for their distinctive black-on-black ware, made by combining designs that had been highly burnished (and appeared glossy) with those that were slip-painted (and appeared matte). Maria continued to produce pottery after Julian’s death in 1943, collaborating with family members. This jar was made with her son, Popovi Da. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Bequest of Phyllis Clark", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2006.39_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2006.39_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2006.39_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2006.39_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31036", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2562, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2562", "Disp_Access_No" : "1922.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1895", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1905", "Disp_Title" : "Bowl", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Nampeyo", "Sort_Artist" : "Nampeyo", "Disp_Dimen" : "3 x 9 1/4 in. (7.6 x 23.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "3 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay with mineral pigment", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Nampeyo's name and her descendants are cultural icons of Pueblo pottery. Belonging to the Hopi First Mesa pueblo, she learned to make pots at an early age. She is credited with the revival of Hopi pottery-making in the early 20th century, a result of her great skill and innovative adaptations of traditional forms and designs. The interior of this bowl is decorated with an image of a katsina, a supernatural being embodied by masked dancers of the pueblos. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mrs. Henry A. Strong", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : ""The ''Katchena'' painted in the bowl is a charm used in the snake dances. --collector''s notes in file", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/22.1_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/22.1_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/22.1_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/22.1_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "24115", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 21301, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/21301", "Disp_Access_No" : "2021.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2000", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2000", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2000", "Disp_Title" : "Tlingit Magic Hat", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Preston Singletary", "Sort_Artist" : "Singletary, Preston", "Disp_Dimen" : "21 x 19 in. (53.3 x 48.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "21 in.", "Disp_Width" : "19 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Glass", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Like all of Preston Singletary’s work, Tlingit Magic Hat fuses the traditional designs of his Native Northwest culture with the modern materials and techniques of contemporary art glass. Transformation themes, shamanism, and basketry patterns are among his inspirations. Singletary based this work on a centuries-old Tlingit design (see photo below), yet here the enhanced crown represents the fin of a killer whale. Singletary started blowing glass directly out of high school and developed his style and approach through practical experience and by working with area artists, both Native and non-Native. Currently a member of the Board of Trustees at the Pilchuck Glass School, his work is included in museum collections throughout the world. [Summer 2015]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Brian Cameros", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Glass", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2.2008L_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2.2008L_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2.2008L_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2.2008L_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "27423", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 12646, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/12646", "Disp_Access_No" : "2004.27", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Basket (Olla)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Apache", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Apache", "Disp_Dimen" : "18 x 11 1/4 in. (45.7 x 28.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "18 in.", "Disp_Width" : "11 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Grasses", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Grasses, dyes", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The Apache people have long been known for their exquisite basket work. Women made the baskets from thin sticks of willow, cottonwood, or sumac which they collected, soaked and then stitched together. Color was added with a variety of natural dyes. This large olla, or jar-shaped basket, is decorated with human, animal and geometric forms. Made for sale, it took a highly skilled weaver to manage the geometric patterns and designs on such a large basket, which required many months to complete and would have been highly prized. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Gorham Parks", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Basketry", "Creation_Place2" : "Native American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2004.27_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2004.27_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2004.27_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2004.27_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26555", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }