{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 7857, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7857", "Disp_Access_No" : "1987.84", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Spirit Board (Gope)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Papua New Guinean", "Disp_Dimen" : "54 x 12 3/4 in. (137.2 x 32.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "54 in.", "Disp_Width" : "12 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Traditionally, spirit or gope boards were considered dwelling places for individual spirits. Each spirit was linked to specific parts of the land, river or sea associated with the clan. They were kept in each clan’s cubicle within the larger Men’s House along with other items such as human and animal skulls meant to honor various spirits within their clan. The boards' highly stylized imagery is believed to represent the way the spirit looks. While the imagery reflects certain consistencies within clans, their varied style and appearance reflects individual artists’ representations of individual spirits. Despite differences, every board has a face and a navel. The navel was particularly important because it served as the access point through which the spirit entered the board. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of James and Denise Wasserstrom", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/87.84_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/87.84_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/87.84_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/87.84_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29879", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "These images are smaller than the usual in-house registration photographs because they were taken with Jessica Marten''s personal Canon camera which does not have a raw file format. But because they were taken with accession numbers and color bars, it was determined it was best to create master, print, access files, rather than just access files. These are not appropriate for publication, but are perfectly good for web display.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7824, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7824", "Disp_Access_No" : "1970.82", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Hook Figure (Yipwon)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Arambak", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Arambak", "Disp_Dimen" : "85 in. (215.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "85 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, shell", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This hook figure, or yipwon, is a 20th century reproduction of old, powerful figures believed to guide and assist tribes in hunting and warfare. The hooks represent ribs which surround the central element of the heart. The large yipwon were kept in the sacred space of the Men’s House where it acted as a vessel to house primordial ancestral spirits. These spirits were called into the yipwon prior to battle by a senior man who activated the figure by rubbing it with powerful substances. If the battle was a success, returning warriors smeared it with the blood of their victims. Particularly effective yipwon were handed down for generations. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/70.82_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/70.82_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/70.82_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/70.82_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26795", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7829, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7829", "Disp_Access_No" : "1973.139", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Gable Mask", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Iatmul", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Iatmul", "Disp_Dimen" : "14 3/4 x 7 11/16 x 4 1/2 in. (37.5 x 19.5 x 11.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "14 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "7 11/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, pigment, shell", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The spiritual lives of Melanesian communities are dominated by Men’s Societies. The ceremonial Men’s House is the sacred dwelling place of the clan spirits, treasures, and of initiated men. Gable masks like this adorned the façades of Men’s Houses. Similar to gargoyles in medieval churches, these figures were meant to ward off troublesome spirits that can cause illness and spread mischief. Gable masks embodied powerful female, ancestral spirits. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.139_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.139_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.139_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.139_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "26798", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/73.139_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/73.139_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/73.139_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/73.139_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "28374", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk 090113", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7836, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7836", "Disp_Access_No" : "1974.76", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Spirit Figure (Mindja)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Waresi", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Waresi", "Disp_Dimen" : "41 3/4 x 9 13/16 x 4 5/16 in. (106 x 25 x 11 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "41 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 13/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The cultivation of yams was central to the lives of the Waresi people; they served as both a ceremonial and staple food. The spirits responsible for their growth (and by extension for the welfare of the community) needed to be properly honored upon the harvest. During the mindja-ma ceremony a basket containing yams was adorned with two of these figures. Mindja were considered to be powerful male water spirits who lived, and were sometimes visible, just below the surface in lakes. This powerful otherworldly being embodies the qualities of humans, plants and animals. The simplified eyes, nose and mouth are based on the human face. The painted diamond shapes symbolize banana leaves, and the projecting triangles that run down the bottom half of the figure represent an undulating snake. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Papua New Guinean", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/74.76_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/74.76_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/74.76_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/74.76_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "26801", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }