{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 192, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/192", "Disp_Access_No" : "1934.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "before 1831", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1821", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1830", "Disp_Title" : "Colonel Nathaniel Rochester", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "American artist", "Sort_Artist" : "American artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "30 x 25 in. (76.2 x 63.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "30 in.", "Disp_Width" : "25 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Long celebrated as our city’s founder, Nathaniel Rochester (1752–1831) was recently discovered to have bought and sold enslaved people while he lived in Maryland. Not only did Rochester buy and sell enslaved people in the South as a business venture, he continued to own and profit from the labor of enslaved individuals after moving north. In fact, he did so until New York State law made it impossible for him to continue in 1827. This information makes evident how insidious and enmeshed slavery was in the business life of the early nineteenth century, even in the northern states. Many decades before Kodak gave us the snapshot, a portrait such as this one was a way for a privileged, white person of this period to capture their likeness for posterity. In comparison, the enslaved Black men, women, and children of Rochester’s household did not have their portraits painted. Their names, likenesses, and personal stories went largely unrecorded and most have not survived history—another example of the dehumanization of enslaved individuals during this period of American history. [Gallery label text, 2021]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Thomas J. Watson", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "United States", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Conversation between Marjorie Searl and Holly Cumberland (Rochester family descendant) regarding acquisition and attribution of painting (December 7, 2009); Holly wanted to alert us to the book "Nathaniel" written by her grandfather, Rochester Rogers, whose son Nathaniel died of throat cancer in 1945. In the book, Rogers alludes to the painting of Nathaniel Rochester, and that it was acquired for MAG by Thomas Watson. Holly''s contention is that Thomas Watson bought the painting believing that it was by Audubon, and that as Rochester Rogers and Thomas Watson were friends, there would have been ample opportunity for Watson to have ascertained from his friend Rogers that it was in fact by Audubon. However, as I explained to Holly, it was Rochester Rogers'' sister Helen who strongly supported the Audubon attribution, so this comment does not change the fact that there is virtually no objective and external evidence pointing to this portrait''s being by Audubon, other than an anonymous inscription on the back of the painting.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/34.1_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/34.1_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/34.1_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/34.1_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12350", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 461, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/461", "Disp_Access_No" : "1946.62", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1871", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1871", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1871", "Disp_Title" : "Francis Granger (1792 - 1868)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Daniel Huntington", "Sort_Artist" : "Huntington, Daniel", "Disp_Dimen" : "32 x 27 in. (81.3 x 68.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "32 in.", "Disp_Width" : "27 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Bequest of Antoinette Pierson Granger", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "United States", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/46.62_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/46.62_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/46.62_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/46.62_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "22375", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk MAG v. 56", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 916, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/916", "Disp_Access_No" : "1963.8", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1870", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1865", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1875", "Disp_Title" : "Cigar Store Indian", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Thomas V. Brooks", "Sort_Artist" : "Brooks, Thomas V.", "Disp_Dimen" : "85 x 24 3/8 x 26 1/2 in. (215.9 x 61.9 x 67.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "85 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood and paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "If you approached 50 West Main Street in Rochester late in the 19th century, you would have seen this figure standing in front of the tobacco shop located there. So that no one would miss the point that tobacco products were sold inside, it was purchased to stand outside and advertise the shop’s wares. The carving included stylized tobacco leaves and a tobacco box held in the figure’s outstretched right hand. Carvers capitalized early on the relationship between Native Americans and the tobacco that they grew for sacred practices. Carvings of Native Americans were used by the 18th century in British tobacco shops, reflecting the growth of the transatlantic trade. With laws restricting sidewalk signs, and the decline of tobacco shops due to public health awareness, the once-ubiquitous cigar store Indian has become a rarity. [Gallery label text, 2002]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "United States", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/63.8_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/63.8_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/63.8_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/63.8_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "39023", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Derived from 63.8_M1; no print level image had been made at the time the photograph was made, so a TIF was made 8/30 and a new JPG derived. KS", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/63.8_R2.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/63.8_R2.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/63.8_R2.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/63.8_R2.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "43078", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/63.8_R3.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/63.8_R3.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/63.8_R3.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/63.8_R3.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "43079", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/63.8_R4.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/63.8_R4.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/63.8_R4.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/63.8_R4.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "43080", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/63.8_R1.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/63.8_R1.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/63.8_R1.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/63.8_R1.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "43081", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3773, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3773", "Disp_Access_No" : "1946.64", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1857", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1857", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1857", "Disp_Title" : "Mindwell Pease Granger (1770-1860)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "American artist", "Sort_Artist" : "American artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 5/8 x 8 3/4 in. (27 x 22.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "8 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Watercolor", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor on paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Mindwell Pease Granger was the wife of Gideon Granger (1767-1822), Canandaigua", "Dedication" : "Bequest of Antoinette Pierson Granger", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Watercolor", "Creation_Place2" : "United States", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/46.64_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/46.64_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/46.64_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/46.64_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "21756", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4956, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4956", "Disp_Access_No" : "1966.20", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1875", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1875", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1875", "Disp_Title" : "Love's Mirror", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Nicola Cantalamessa-Papotti", "Sort_Artist" : "Cantalamessa-Papotti, Nicola", "Disp_Dimen" : "85 in. (215.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "85 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Marble", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Marble", "Info_Page_Comm" : "When Rochester businessman and art collector Daniel Powers brought this piece home from the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia in 1876, it made local headlines. One newspaper article admired its “grace and life-likeness rarely met with in modern composition.” The sculpture was on view at Powers’ own gallery downtown for many years, for an admission charge of $.25. Cantalamessa-Papotti also made a portrait of Powers and the monuments for the families of Rochester nurserymen Ellwanger and Barry, at Mt. Hope and Holy Sepulchre cemeteries. Interpretations of the figures vary: the Powers Gallery catalogue identified the subject as Cupid giving a girl her first lesson in love by means of a mirror, but the figures may in fact be Cupid with his mother Venus, who is often shown holding a mirror. Mythological and allegorical characters were beloved of academic artists, who could illustrate an abstract quality such as vanity while demonstrating their prowess at depicting the human figure. [Gallery label text, 2011]", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Isaac Gordon estate", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Italy", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "No. I under "Statuary" in Daniel Powers'' collection catalogue as of 1877. Continuing in later catalogues", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/66.20_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/66.20_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/66.20_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/66.20_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "15989", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/powersbuilding2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/powersbuilding2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/powersbuilding2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/powersbuilding2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "17389", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Contemporary photo of the Powers Building.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4964, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4964", "Disp_Access_No" : "1957.18", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1890-1899", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1890", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1899", "Disp_Title" : "Interior of a Mosque", "Alt_Title" : "Mosque at Cairo", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Jean-Léon Gérôme", "Sort_Artist" : "Gérôme, Jean-Léon", "Disp_Dimen" : "23 3/8 x 35 3/8 in. (59.4 x 89.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "23 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "35 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "An enthusiastic amateur archaeologist, Gérôme painted dozens of Eastern scenes over his long career, including a number of mosque interiors. Although the mosque seen here has not been identified, the artist was known to have travelled in Asia Minor, the Middle East, and North Africa, and it is believed that this elaborate interior is a composite, made up of details from a number of specific sites. The worshippers assume accurate postures for their devotions, from the initial upright recitation of vows to the final prostration before God. Gérôme was a firm proponent of the Academic style: he taught at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and won national honors and the patronage of royalty. Although his pupils had included icons of modernism such as Fernand Leger and Everett Shinn, Gérôme was initially opposed to any challenges to the supremacy of the Academy. In the face of increasing opposition to his conservative viewpoint, he declared that the work of the Impressionists was “insipid and badly executed.” [Gallery label text, 2011]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. F. Harper Sibley", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "France", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/57.18_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/57.18_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/57.18_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/57.18_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "38927", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Scanned from transparency", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }