{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 5049, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5049", "Disp_Access_No" : "1953.8", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1630-1635", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1630", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1635", "Disp_Title" : "Two Musicians", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Bernardo Strozzi", "Sort_Artist" : "Strozzi, Bernardo", "Disp_Dimen" : "45 5/8 x 47 7/8 in. (115.9 x 121.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "45 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "47 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "without frame", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This scene of a middle-aged lute player and young violinist illustrates many qualities of Baroque art. Both musicians look directly out from the painting, their eye contact and lively expressions establishing a sympathetic psychological relationship with their audience. A parapet that separates performer from spectator links imaginary and actual space; dramatic lighting, naturalistic details and richly saturated colors all merge to intensify the viewer’s visual experience. The meaning of Two Musicians leaves much to the imagination. The two figures here could suggest a contrast between naïve youth and experienced age; the violin and the lute both refer to ideas of balance and harmony. Concert scenes sometimes symbolize the sense of hearing or the idea of harmony and love. Whatever the interpretation, these paintings of concerts were, like the music they represent, extremely popular with their public during the Baroque period. As a young man, Strozzi entered a monastery where he painted religious subjects. After his father’s death, he was allowed to leave the monastery to support his mother; he refused, though, to return after she died and was forced to flee his native Genoa. In 1631, he settled in Venice, where he became a Roman Catholic prelate, or church official. He enjoyed continuous success as a painter for the rest of his life. [Gallery label text] ", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Public Domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Italy", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Per catalogue raisonne, one of eighteen versions of this scene.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.8_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.8_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.8_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.8_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "15969", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/53.8_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/53.8_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/53.8_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/53.8_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29168", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "Scanned by Andy Olenick April 2009 from a 1999 transparency shot by James Via. Master exists only in TIF form, not DNG. On disk 090407", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 6873, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/6873", "Disp_Access_No" : "1983.52", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1800-1850", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1800", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1850", "Disp_Title" : "The God Shiva, His Consort Parvati, and a Musician", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Indian artist", "Sort_Artist" : "Indian artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 1/2 x 10 5/8 in. (19.1 x 27 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "10 5/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet (irregular)", "Medium" : "Opaque watercolor", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Opaque watercolor, ink, gold and silver paint on paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Shiva as the divine ascetic and the embodiment of the creative-destructive force can be identified by many attributes, each having symbolic value. He wears a tiger/leopard skin wrap (he has conquered pride), snakes coil around his hair, neck, and arms (cosmic energy, regeneration), he holds an axe (destruction) and a deer (regeneration, control of man's unsteady mind). His matted hair contains the crescent moon (time), from the top of his head flows the river Ganga (fertility), and he has a third eye in the center of his forehead (wisdom). Shiva's consort or female half, Parvati, shown in quite elaborate dress, sits next to him as a musician entertains them. The white bull in the lower corner is Nandi, Shiva's vahana or vehicle, who, in India, is often worshiped in Shiva's place.", "Dedication" : "Gift of Helen H. Reiff in memory of Robert F. Reiff", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "India", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "Rajput School (1500-1899)", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/83.52_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/83.52_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/83.52_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/83.52_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "14767", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }