{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 2455, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2455", "Disp_Access_No" : "1965.7", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1964", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1964", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1964", "Disp_Title" : "Jackie", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Andy Warhol", "Sort_Artist" : "Warhol, Andy", "Disp_Dimen" : "23 7/8 x 23 1/4 in. (60.6 x 59.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "23 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "23 1/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Acrylic", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Warhol often used an unorthodox approach to portraiture. He borrowed from media photographs of celebrities to construct an individual’s public image instead of using a brush to render an idiosyncratic artistic interpretation of a sitter’s appearance. This work is part of Warhol’s “Jackie” series, which he began shortly after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963. As the basis for the paintings, he first selected eight photographs from the mass-media coverage of the event. He then cropped the pictures to focus on the President’s widow, Jacqueline Kennedy. Warhol used a commercial silkscreen technique to produce multiple versions of his work. As Warhol described, I wanted something that gave more of an assembly line effect….With silkscreening you pick a photograph, blow it up, transfer it in glue onto silk, and then roll ink across it so the ink goes through the silk but not through the glue. That way you get the same image, slightly different each time. It was all so simple quick and chancy. [Forman Gallery, Summer 2015]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/65.7_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/65.7_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/65.7_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/65.7_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12431", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2457, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2457", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.314", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1964", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1964", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1964", "Disp_Title" : "Flowers", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Andy Warhol", "Sort_Artist" : "Warhol, Andy", "Disp_Dimen" : "23 1/8 x 23 1/8 in. (58.7 x 58.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "23 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "23 1/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Offset lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Andy Warhol regularly appropriated imagery from other artists. Here, he based his image on a photograph of hibiscus flowers by Patricia Caulfield in "Modern Photography", June 1964. [Gallery label text 2012] Warhol’s Flowers series was based upon a photo published in the June 1964 issue of Modern Photography taken by the magazine’s editor, Patricia Caulfield. Warhol’s appropriation of images was to have an enormous effect upon later artists—turn around to see Devorah Sperber’s appropriation of Grant Wood’s painting, American Gothic—but it was not appreciated by Caulfield who threatened to sue Warhol when she saw his Flowers. Although Caulfield never filed a lawsuit, Warhol did pay her for the use of her photo. ", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.314_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.314_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.314_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.314_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12732", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2458, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2458", "Disp_Access_No" : "1975.335.10", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1964", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1964", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1964", "Disp_Title" : "Birmingham Race Riot", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Andy Warhol", "Sort_Artist" : "Warhol, Andy", "Disp_Dimen" : "19 15/16 x 24 in. (50.7 x 61 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "19 15/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "24 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet/image", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Serigraph on paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Andy Warhol frequently appropriated images by other artists for his work. In this case, the image was originally a photograph by Charles Moore in "Life" magazine, May 17, 1963. [Gallery label text 2013] This image first appeared in Andy Warhol’s Disasters series, in which the artist selected, cropped, altered, and reproduced mass-circulated news photographs. The series commented upon America’s social ills with photos of suicides, car crashes and nuclear explosions. Birmingham Race Riot captures the racial tensions that gripped the country during the Civil Rights Movement. Warhol was an eager consumer of newspapers and magazines; he likely saw this photo of the Birmingham riot when it was published in LIFE magazine on May 17, 1963, only five days after the event it immortalized. The original photograph was taken by Charles Moore. ", "Dedication" : "The Charles Rand Penney Collection of the Memorial Art Gallery", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/75.335.10_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/75.335.10_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/75.335.10_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/75.335.10_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "43451", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2459, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2459", "Disp_Access_No" : "1976.132", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1966", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1966", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1966", "Disp_Title" : "Jacqueline Kennedy III", "Alt_Title" : "Jacqueline Kennedy III", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Andy Warhol", "Sort_Artist" : "Warhol, Andy", "Disp_Dimen" : "40 x 30 in. (101.6 x 76.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "40 in.", "Disp_Width" : "30 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Serigraph on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The images that Andy Warhol used of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy were based on photographs by Fred War in "Life" magazine, December 6, 1963. [Gallery label text] From the portfolio "Eleven Pop Artists, Volume III" Pop Art print rotation, Post-1950 American art gallery, Jessica Marten, Assistant Curator, Oct. 3, 2011 - March 5, 2012: President John F. Kennedy was the first “television president;” he and his wife and children were regulars on our TVs, as if they were our royal family. After the President’s assassination, Warhol treated images of Jacqueline Kennedy as a popular culture commodity much like his ubiquitous Campbell Soup can. Warhol used a commercial silkscreen technique to produce his art. “I wanted something that gave more of an assembly line effect… With silkscreening you pick a photograph, blow it up, transfer it in glue onto silk, and then roll ink across it so the ink goes through the silk but not through the glue. That way you get the same image, slightly different each time. It was all so simple quick and chancy.” ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel G. Schuman", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Text in Box #280.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/76.132_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/76.132_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/76.132_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/76.132_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "27606", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "On disk dated 1-16-05", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 2461, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2461", "Disp_Access_No" : "1978.97", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1966", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1966", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1966", "Disp_Title" : "Campbell's Soup Can on Shopping Bag", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Andy Warhol", "Sort_Artist" : "Warhol, Andy", "Disp_Dimen" : "19 1/2 x 16 15/16 in. (49.5 x 43 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "19 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "16 15/16 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "bag without handle", "Medium" : "Printer''s ink", "Support" : "paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Color serigraph on shopping bag", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This bag was published for a Warhol exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, on view from October 1 - November 6, 1966. Two years earlier, serigraphed shopping bags sporting a Warhol soup can and a Lichtenstein turkey were made for an exhibit entitled "American Supermarket" at the Bianchini Gallery in New York. Signed by the artists, in editions of about 125 each, they cost $12 apiece. Sold as exhibition souvenirs, the shopping bags were an instant hit. People used them until they fell apart and now those novelty items have gained a status completely counter to their original intent. [Gallery label text 2012] Andy Warhol designed this bag with his iconic Campbell’s Soup can for a 1966 exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston. Sold as ephemeral souvenirs, those that have held up the past 45 years have gained a lofty status counter to their original intent. The popularity of these shopping bags and others like them inspired the production of other Pop multiples as seen in the case nearby, including Warhol’s Kiss. ", "Dedication" : "Gift of the Genesee Valley School Development Association", "Copyright_Type" : "Under Copyright", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Published for a Warhol exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, MA, October 1 - November 6, 1966. Unknown edition size and an unknown number signed.", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/78.97_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/78.97_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/78.97_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/78.97_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12738", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }