{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 5290, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5290", "Disp_Access_No" : "1942.14", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 200 BCE - 500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "200 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "500", "Disp_Title" : "Seated Dog Vessel", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Colima", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Colima", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 3/4 x 4 3/4 in. (27.3 x 12.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 3/4 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The rounded, hollow Colima vessels were made with reddish clay. The black spattering was not intentional, it is the result of the oxidation of the chemical element, manganese, present in the clay. This occurred when the manganese was leached out, over time, by contact with water in the tombs. The vessels’ smooth, lustrous surfaces were attained through burnishing – a process of rubbing the surface with a smooth rock to make it shiny. In addition to ceramics, valuable goods obtained through trade, such as shell, green stone and obsidian were buried in the shaft-and-chamber tombs of the Colima people. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R.T. Miller, Jr. Fund #2", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/42.14_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/42.14_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/42.14_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/42.14_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20151", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5293, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5293", "Disp_Access_No" : "1942.24", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 200 BCE – 500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "200 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "500", "Disp_Title" : "Horned Hunchback Figure Vessel", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Colima", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Colima", "Disp_Dimen" : "12 7/8 x 9 in. (32.7 x 22.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "12 7/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Many ceramic hunchback figures with single horns strapped to their heads have been found in the tombs of the Colima culture. The frequency with which hunchbacks and dwarfs appear in the art of the Ancient Americas may indicate their significant status as shamans or spiritual advisors. The horns strapped to the Colima figures are thought to represent powerful caps characteristically worn by shamans across many cultures. Shamanism is a religious system in which the shaman is a spiritual mediator between the physical and spiritual worlds. A shaman figure buried in a tomb may have served to guide the deceased’s transition from the living to the realm of the dead. [Gallery label text, 2009] ", "Dedication" : "By exchange from Stendahl Galleries", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/42.24_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/42.24_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/42.24_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/42.24_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29767", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/42.24_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/42.24_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/42.24_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/42.24_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "29768", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/42.24_A4.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/42.24_A4.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/42.24_A4.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/42.24_A4.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "29769", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5310, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5310", "Disp_Access_No" : "1954.40.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "200 BCE - 500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "200 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "500", "Disp_Title" : "Seated Female Figure", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Colima", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Colima", "Disp_Dimen" : "6 5/8 x 4 3/4 x 3 1/2 in. (16.8 x 12.1 x 8.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "6 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The ancient people of West Mexico focused upon the powerful bonds of familial relationships in their ceramics. Treating death not as an end of existence, but as a next stage in a larger journey, these transitional objects were made in the physical world for travel with the dead to the Underworld. Perhaps such figural ceramic groups were made to accompany the deceased into the afterlife as an extension of earthly comforts. Another, more symbolic and less personal approach interprets the ceramic groups as embodiments of agriculture, abundance or lineage. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R.T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/54.40.1_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/54.40.1_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/54.40.1_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/54.40.1_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20156", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/54.40.1-.2_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/54.40.1-.2_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/54.40.1-.2_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/54.40.1-.2_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20157", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5360, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5360", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.59", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 200 BCE - 500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "200 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "500", "Disp_Title" : "Hunchback Dwarf Figure Vessel", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Colima", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Colima", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 13/16 x 6 7/8 x 5 15/16 in. (25 x 17.4 x 15.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 13/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "6 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Some figural art created by Ancient American cultures may not depict actual humans, but may use the human form as a symbol. The lives of the people of ancient Mesoamerica depended upon their ability to grow and produce food. The cultivation of maize (corn) was central to their world view. The human figure could capture aspects of a belief system that intertwined the cycles of life with the cycles of agriculture. For example, a hunchback (“fatback”) might symbolize abundance, and a dwarf might represent the stunted ears of corn a typical maize plant produces with the healthy ear. Mother and child figures might symbolize lineage or the way corn starts as a kernel, grows into a stalk of corn, and is harvested for consumption. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.59_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.59_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.59_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.59_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "15785", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.59_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.59_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.59_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.59_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20171", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.59_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.59_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.59_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.59_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20172", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5432, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5432", "Disp_Access_No" : "1978.138", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "200 BCE - 500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "200 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "500", "Disp_Title" : "Standing Dog Vessel", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Colima", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Colima", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 1/2 x 5 x 12 1/2 in. (19.1 x 12.7 x 31.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In nearly every world culture, dogs were the first domesticated animals. A large proportion of Colima tombs had actual dogs or dog-shaped vessels interred with the deceased. The frequently plump bodies of the dog vessels and their ubiquity in Colima tombs support different theories. Some scholars believe they represent a hairless breed of dog that was fattened and eaten at feasts. Others think the primary role of the dog was as spiritual guide to the Underworld. Those well-treated in life (and thus well-fed) would act as a guide for the owner’s safe passage to the Underworld in death. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Canon and Mrs. Nathaniel T. Whitcomb", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/78.138_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/78.138_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/78.138_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/78.138_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "27874", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5473, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5473", "Disp_Access_No" : "1994.58", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "200 BCE - 500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "200 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "500", "Disp_Title" : "Dog Vessel", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Colima", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Colima", "Disp_Dimen" : "10 x 19 in. (25.4 x 48.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "10 in.", "Disp_Width" : "19 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Earthenware", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Earthenware", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gift of Richard M. Buxbaum in memory of Dr. Henry and Hermine Buxbaum", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "Precolumbian", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/94.58_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/94.58_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/94.58_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/94.58_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "30525", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5479, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5479", "Disp_Access_No" : "1994.59", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "200 BCE - 500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "200 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "500", "Disp_Title" : "Jar with Relief Figures", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Colima", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Colima", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 x 13 1/2 x 5 in. (22.9 x 34.3 x 12.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 in.", "Disp_Width" : "13 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Generous offerings of real food and ceramics representing foods were placed in tombs for the deceased’s consumption in the afterlife. Other similar jars from the Colima culture represent regional foods such as fruits, vegetables and seafood. It is possible that the small, unidentified creatures on this jar were a food source. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Gift of Lili Wildenhain", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "Precolumbian", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/94.59_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/94.59_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/94.59_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/94.59_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "30526", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/94.59_A3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/94.59_A3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/94.59_A3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/94.59_A3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "30527", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11188, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11188", "Disp_Access_No" : "1954.40.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "200 BCE - 500 CE", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "200 BCE", "_Disp_End_Date" : "500", "Disp_Title" : "Standing Male Figure", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown, Colima", "Sort_Artist" : "Unknown, Colima", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 3/8 x 4 3/4 x 1 3/8 in. (23.8 x 12.1 x 3.5 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 3/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "4 3/4 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The ancient people of West Mexico focused upon the powerful bonds of familial relationships in their ceramics. Treating death not as an end of existence, but as a next stage in a larger journey, these transitional objects were made in the physical world for travel with the dead to the Underworld. Perhaps such figural ceramic groups were made to accompany the deceased into the afterlife as an extension of earthly comforts. Another, more symbolic and less personal approach interprets the ceramic groups as embodiments of agriculture, abundance or lineage. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R.T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexican", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/54.40.2_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/54.40.2_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/54.40.2_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/54.40.2_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20158", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/54.40.1-.2_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/54.40.1-.2_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/54.40.1-.2_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/54.40.1-.2_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20159", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }