{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 5295, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5295", "Disp_Access_No" : "1944.61", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "300-900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "300", "_Disp_End_Date" : "900", "Disp_Title" : "Warrior Head", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Remojadas artist", "Sort_Artist" : "Remojadas artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 1/2 x 5 1/2 in. (19.1 x 14 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "5 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Clay", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clay", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Veracruz, the Gulf Coast region of Mexico, is rich in archaeological sites with great quantities of ceramic and stone sculptures. This head is a fragment of a larger figure, now missing. The influence from the Maya civilization to the south is visible in the face’s crossed eyes. The Maya believed that since humans had to squint their eyes to look at the sun, the Sun God squinted back. Thus, crossed eyes became a standard of beauty, and parents would hang beads between their children’s eyes so they became permanently crossed. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "R. T. Miller Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Ceramics", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexico", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "Precolumbian", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/44.61_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/44.61_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/44.61_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/44.61_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "29770", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 5340, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/5340", "Disp_Access_No" : "1971.14", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "600-900", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "600", "_Disp_End_Date" : "900", "Disp_Title" : "Hacha", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Veracruz artist", "Sort_Artist" : "Veracruz artist", "Disp_Dimen" : "7 1/2 in. (19.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "7 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Stone", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Stone", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The so-called hachas of the Mesoamerican ballgame were not axes as the Spanish name implies, but were named for their sharp, thin shape. Scholars debate over whether or not stone hachas functioned as markers on the ballcourt or representations of protective gear worn by the players. Hachas are frequently heads, which when worn on a player’s yoke might have alluded to a “trophy head” of the player’s previously defeated opponents. [Gallery label text, 2009]", "Dedication" : "Marion Stratton Gould Fund", "Copyright_Type" : "Artist Unknown", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Stonework", "Creation_Place2" : "Mexico", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.14_A1.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.14_A1.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.14_A1.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.14_A1.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "20168", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/71.14_A2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/71.14_A2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/71.14_A2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/71.14_A2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "20169", "Image_Type" : "digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }